Laser & Photonics Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 6

November 2009

Volume 3, Issue 6

Pages A43–A52, 483–622

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
    1. Cover Picture: Laser & Photon. Rev. 3(6)/2009

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200990008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      White light diffraction from waveguide Bragg gratings fabricated in doped phosphate glass using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique. Such a waveguide Bragg grating was instrumental to the first demonstration of a monolithic waveguide laser using this technique. (Picture: M. Ams et al., pp. 535–544, in this issue)

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
  4. News and Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
    1. News and Highlights (pages A49–A50)

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200910518

  5. Conference News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
    1. Conference News (pages A51–A52)

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200910519

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
    1. Ultra-fast nano-optics (pages 483–507)

      P. Vasa, C. Ropers, R. Pomraenke and C. Lienau

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810064

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      This article gives a brief introduction into the emerging research field of ultrafast nano-optics and discusses recent progress made in it. It is discussed how ultrafast nano-optical techniques can be used to probe and manipulate coherent optical excitations in individual and dipole-coupled pairs of quantum dots, probe the dynamics of surface plasmon polariton excitations in metallic nanostructures, generate novel nanometer-sized ultrafast light and electron sources and reveal the dipole interaction between excitons and surface plasmon polaritons in hybrid metal-semiconductor nanostructures.

    2. Nanosilicon photonics (pages 508–534)

      N. Daldosso and L. Pavesi

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810045

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      Silicon photonics is no longer an emerging field of research and technology but a present reality with commercial products available on the market, where low-dimensional silicon (nanosilicon or nano-Si) can play a fundamental role. After a brief history of the field, the optical properties of nano-dimensional silicon are introduced. The use of Si, in the form of Si nanocrystals, in the main building blocks of silicon photonics (waveguides, modulators, sources and detectors) is reviewed and discussed.

    3. Ultrafast laser written active devices (pages 535–544)

      M. Ams, G.D. Marshall, P. Dekker, J.A. Piper and M.J. Withford

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810050

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      Direct-write optical waveguide device fabrication is probably the most widely studied application of femtosecond laser micromachining in transparent dielectrics at the present time. Devices such as buried waveguides, power splitters, couplers, gratings, optical amplifiers and laser oscillators have all been demonstrated. This paper reviews the application of the femtosecond laser direct-write technique to the fabrication of active waveguide devices in bulk glass materials.

    4. Mechanisms for soft-tissue ablation and the development of alternative medical lasers based on investigations with mid-infrared free-electron lasers (pages 545–555)

      G.S. Edwards

      Version of Record online: 9 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810063

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      Experimental evidence indicating the potential biomedical advantages of using a Mark-III Free-Electron Laser (FEL) for the ablation of soft tissue were first reported in 1994. Research progress since that time is reviewed, including the successful human surgery using the Mark-III FEL, advances in understanding the physical mechanism for infrared tissue ablation, the pursuit of table-top, nanosecond-pulsed laser technology and other current research challenges.

    5. Prospects for measurement-based quantum computing with solid state spins (pages 556–574)

      S.C. Benjamin, B.W. Lovett and J.M. Smith

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810051

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      This article reviews the developments, both theoretical and experimental, that have in the past decade laid the ground for a new approach to solid state quantum computing. Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) requires neither direct interaction between qubits nor even what would be considered controlled generation of entanglement. Rather it can be achieved using entanglement that is generated probabilistically by the collapse of quantum states upon measurement.

    6. Plasmonic metasurfaces for waveguiding and field enhancement (pages 575–590)

      I.P. Radko, V.S. Volkov, J. Beermann, A.B. Evlyukhin, T. Søndergaard, A. Boltasseva and S.I. Bozhevolnyi

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810071

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      The explosive progress in nanoscience has led to uncovering and exploring numerous physical phenomena occurring at nanoscale, especially when metal nanostructures are involved so that optical fields and electronic oscillations can be resonantly coupled. The latter is the subject of (nano) plasmonics with implications extending from subwavelength waveguiding to localized field enhancements. In this review paper, the use of various phenomena related to multiple scattering of surface plasmons (SPs) is considered at periodically and randomly (nano) structured metal surfaces.

  7. Editor's Choice

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. News and Highlights
    6. Conference News
    7. Reviews
    8. Editor's Choice
    1. You have free access to this content
      More power to X-rays: New developments in X-ray spectroscopy (pages 591–622)

      T. Guo

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.200810028

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      Recent developments in X-ray spectroscopy in the last decade are reviewed. A specific emphasis is placed on displaying the strong natural connection between X-ray spectroscopy and materials science. Brief explanations of several X-ray spectroscopic methods are given. X-ray spectroscopic instruments such as table-top X-ray sources are discussed in detail, whereas those employing synchrotron and other sources are briefly addressed. The spectroscopic methods and results from materials investigations are reviewed according to their positions in a 3D parameter space of time, length, and energy.

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