Laser & Photonics Reviews

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 5

September 2012

Volume 6, Issue 5

Pages L1–L14, A23–A31, 589–707

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Front Cover Picture: Laser & Photon. Rev. 6(5)/2012

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201290006

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      Elementary scattering processes in solid matter occur on ultrafast timescales and photoelectron spectroscopy in the time domain represents an excellent tool for their analysis. Conventional photoemission accesses binding energies of electronic states and their momentum dispersion. The use of femtosecond laser pulses in pump-probe experiments allows obtaining direct insights to the energy and momentum dependence of ultrafast dynamics. The picture shows an artist's view of the angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) experiment. The three graphs show the energy and momentum dependent photoemission intensity for different time delays before, during, and after optical excitation in the vicinity of the Fermi momentum, respectively. (Reprinted with permission from [89].) (Picture: U. Bovensiepen, P. S. Kirchmann, pp. 589–606, in this issue)

  2. Back Cover

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Back Cover Picture: Laser & Photon. Rev. 6(5)/2012

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201290010

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      Focused ion beam written channel waveguides in optical crystals. In this figure, focused ion beams (e. g., usually with protons or He ions) at energy of MeV offer direct writing processing of the optical crystals, constructing buried channel waveguides at certain depths. This mask-free irradiation could be utilized to fabricate high quality waveguides with symmetric modal profiles. (Picture: F. Chen, pp. 622–640, in this issue).

  3. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Issue Information: Laser & Photonics Reviews 6(5) / 2011

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201290007

  4. Call for Papers

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    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
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    8. Editorial
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    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
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      Call for Papers: Laser & Photon. Rev. 6(5)/2012 (page A23)

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201290008

  5. Editorial Advisory Board

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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  6. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Contents: Laser & Photonics Reviews 6(5)/2012 (pages A25–A30)

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200508

  7. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Not just reviews – now communications too! (page A31)

      Guido Fuchs and Hakim Meskine

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200509

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
    1. Elementary relaxation processes investigated by femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of two-dimensional materials (pages 589–606)

      U. Bovensiepen and P.S. Kirchmann

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201000035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Elementary scattering processes in solid matter occur on ultrafast timescales and photoelectron spectroscopy in the time domain represents an excellent tool for their analysis. Conventional photoemission accesses binding energies of electronic states and their momentum dispersion. The use of femtosecond laser pulses in pump-probe experiments allows obtaining direct insights to the energy and momentum dependence of ultrafast dynamics. This article introduces the elementary interaction processes and emphasizes recent work performed in this rapidly developing field.

    2. Bessel and annular beams for materials processing (pages 607–621)

      M. Duocastella and C.B. Arnold

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201100031

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      Non-Gaussian beam profiles such as Bessel or annular beams enable novel approaches to modifying materials through laser-based processing. In this review, properties, generation methods and emerging applications for nonconventional beam shapes are discussed, including Bessel, annular, and vortex beams. These intensity profiles have important implications in a number of technologically relevant areas including deep-hole drilling, photopolymerization and nanopatterning, and introduce a new dimension for materials optimization and fundamental studies of laser-matter interactions.

    3. Micro- and submicrometric waveguiding structures in optical crystals produced by ion beams for photonic applications (pages 622–640)

      F. Chen

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201100037

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      Energetic ion beams with diverse energies, species and beam dimensions have been extensively utilized to modify the properties of the materials to achieve versatile applications in many aspects of the industry, agriculture and scientific research. In optics, the ion beam technology has been applied to fabricate various micro- and submicrometric guiding structures on a wide range of optical crystals through the efficient modulation of the refractive indices or structuring of the surface, realizing various applications in many branches of photonics.

    4. Lessons from nature: biomimetic subwavelength structures for high-performance optics (pages 641–659)

      R. Brunner, O. Sandfuchs, C. Pacholski, C. Morhard and J. Spatz

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201100011

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      In nature, optical structures in the subwavelength range have been evolved over millions of years, e. g. insects ‘moth-eyes’. In this contribution the advantages and challenges to transfer this natural concept of subwavelength structured optical interfaces to high-end optical systems are discussed. Here, in comparison to alternative conventional multilayer systems, the bioinspired antireflective structures offer a wide wavelength range and a broad angle dependency.

    5. From anti-Stokes photoluminescence to resonant Raman scattering in GaN single crystals and GaN-based heterostructures (pages 660–677)

      Y.J. Ding and J.B. Khurgin

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201000028

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      The progress on anti-Stokes photoluminescence and Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering in GaN single crystals and GaN/AlN heterostructures is reviewed. Based on this technique the feasibility of laser cooling of a nitride structure has been demonstrated. Anti-Stokes photoluminescence and Raman scattering have potential applications in upconversion lasers and laser cooling of nitride ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Original Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
    1. Self-assembled CdSe/CdS nanorod micro-lasers fabricated from solution by capillary jet deposition (pages 678–683)

      M. Zavelani-Rossi, R. Krahne, G. Della Valle, S. Longhi, I.R. Franchini, S. Girardo, F. Scotognella, D. Pisignano, L. Manna, G. Lanzani and F. Tassone

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200010

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      An innovative, simple and reliable method to fabricate micro-lasers by self-assembly of rod-shaped nanocrystals is demonstrated. Dot/rod core/shell CdSe/CdS nanorods are used to form optical micro-resonators by exploiting their self-organization into well-defined coffee stain rings. The fabrication process merely consists of capillary jet deposition of a nanorod solution onto a glass substrate, and is scalable, economic, and highly reproducible.

    2. High optical performance and practicality of active plasmonic devices based on rhombohedral BiFeO3 (pages 684–689)

      S.H. Chu, D.J. Singh, J. Wang, E.-P. Li and K.P. Ong

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201280022

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      First principles calculations of electronic and optical properties of multiferroic oxide BiFeO3 are used in combination with a plasmonic device model of optical switch to show that a BiFeO3 based device can have much better performance than devices based on existing materials. A prototype of a plasmonic resonator with an R-BFO thin film layer is used as an example and shows excellent switch and modulation responses.

    3. Detection of a new SRS-promoting phonon mode and cross-cascaded χ(3)-nonlinear lasing in single crystals of calcite (trigonal CaCO3) (pages 690–701)

      L. Bohat, P. Becker, H. Rhee, O. Lux, H.J. Eichler, H. Yoneda and A.A. Kaminskii

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200028

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      For calcite (CaCO3), one of the pioneer crystals in nonlinear optics, new results of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy are presented. Among them are the discovery of a new SRS-promoting vibration mode with ωSRS2 ≈ 282 cm-1 and its participation, together with the main SRS mode ωSRS1 ≈ 1086.5 cm, in cross-cascaded (χ(3) [LEFT RIGHT ARROW] χ(3)) nonlinear-lasing generation, as well as the observation of efficient self-upconversion via cascaded parametric four-wave processes of one-micron Stokes and anti-Stokes χ(3)-lasing into the UV-region of third harmonic generation. The investigations show that calcite is able to generate a χ(3)-lasing comb of more than two octaves bandwidth.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fabrication of multilayer metamaterials by femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer technique (pages 702–707)

      M.L. Tseng, P.C. Wu, S. Sun, C.M. Chang, W.T. Chen, C.H. Chu, P.L. Chen, L. Zhou, D.W. Huang, T.J. Yen and D.P. Tsai

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200029

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      A novel method based on femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer for high-throughput and efficient fabrication of periodic multilayer plasmonic metamaterials is demonstrated. With preciously controlling laser raster path applied on sputtered multilayer thin films, the laser-ablated materials can be transferred to another substrate and leaving fabricated multilayer structure on the original substrate. Subsequently, three dimensional metamaterials can be made by multilayer structuring.

  10. Letter Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
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      Random-access distributed fiber sensing (pages L1–L5)

      A. Zadok, Y. Antman, N. Primerov, A. Denisov, J. Sancho and L. Thevenaz

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optical sensing offers an attractive solution to the societal concern for prevention of natural and human-generated threats and for efficient use of natural resources. The unprecedented properties of optical fibers make them ideal for implementing a ‘nervous system’ in structural health monitoring: they are small, low-cost and electrically and chemically inert. In particular, the nonlinear interaction of stimulated Brillouin scattering allows for the distributed measurement of strain and temperature with tens of km range.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
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    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
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    8. Editorial
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    11. Letter Article
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      Frontispiece: Dual-wavelength optical parametric oscillator using antiresonant ring interferometer (page L6)

      A. Esteban-Martin, V. Ramaiah-Badarla and M. Ebrahim-Zadeh

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201290011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The photograph shows an example of an antiresonant ring (ARR) interferometer, first proposed by Sagnac in 1913. The ARR consists of a beam-splitter and two mirrors, which essentially form a ring. The input optical beams are split into clockwise and counterclockwise beams. After propagation inside the ring and recombination, the beams are totally reflected backwards, making the ARR function as a highly reflecting mirror. In their letter, A. Esteban-Martin, V. Ramaiah-Badarla, and M. Ebrahim-Zadeh (DOI 10.1002/lpor.201200018 pp. L7-L11) report a novel technique for coupling of two resonant optical cavities using the ARR, without coupling between the gain media. While the technique has been demonstrated in a femtosecond synchronously-pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO), the method can be universally applied to any oscillator (OPOs, lasers, and their combination) and/or operating in any temporal regime (continuous-wave, pulsed, ultrafast picosecond and femtosecond, or their combination), and in any spectral range of interest. The absence of gain coupling also enables unrestricted and uninterrupted tuning through wavelength degeneracy, together with the ability to tune the degenerate wavelength, making the technique highly desirable for the generation of widely tunable radiation in different regions across the THz spectrum.

  12. Letter Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Issue Information
    5. Call for Papers
    6. Editorial Advisory Board
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Original Papers
    11. Letter Article
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Letter Article
    1. Dual-wavelength optical parametric oscillator using antiresonant ring interferometer (pages L7–L11)

      A. Esteban-Martin, V. Ramaiah-Badarla and M. Ebrahim-Zadeh

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A technique for coupling of two resonant optical cavities using an antiresonant ring (ARR) interferometer is reported. By deploying two synchronously-pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillators (OPOs), it is shown that the use of an ARR can provide an intracavity common path for the two oscillating fields, but without gain coupling between the two nonlinear media. The new technique permits the generation of two signal (idler) wavelengths, which can be independently and arbitrarily varied across the OPO tuning range.

    2. Quantum design strategy pushes high-power vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers beyond 100 W (pages L12–L14)

      T.-L. Wang, B. Heinen, J. Hader, C. Dineen, M. Sparenberg, A. Weber, B. Kunert, S.W. Koch, J.V. Moloney, M. Koch and W. Stolz

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/lpor.201200034

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      Combining rigorous quantum epitaxial design, highly accurate growth, novel processing and thermal management pushes the output power of single chip vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) beyond the 100 W milestone.

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