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In vitro cell compatibility study of rose bengal–chitosan adhesives

Authors

  • Mathew Barton Bsc,

    1. Bioelectronics and Neuroscience (BENS) Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • Sabine C. Piller PhD,

    1. School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • David A. Mahns PhD,

    1. Bioelectronics and Neuroscience (BENS) Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • John W. Morley PhD,

    1. Bioelectronics and Neuroscience (BENS) Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • Damia Mawad PhD,

    1. Bioelectronics and Neuroscience (BENS) Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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  • Leonardo Longo MD,

    1. School of Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
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  • Antonio Lauto PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Bioelectronics and Neuroscience (BENS) Research Group, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    2. School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    3. School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    • School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797 Penrith, NSW 2751, Sydney, Australia.
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  • Conflict of Interest Disclosures: All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were reported.

Abstract

Background and Objectives

Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) using rose bengal (RB) in conjunction with light is an alternative technique to repair tissue without suturing. It was recently demonstrated that laser-irradiated chitosan films, incorporating RB, bonded firmly to calf intestine in vitro. It is thus required to investigate the possible cytotoxic effects of the RB–chitosan adhesive on cells before testing its application to in vivo models.

Materials and Methods

Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ∼0.1 wt% RB were fabricated. Their cytotoxicity was assessed by growing human and murine fibroblasts either in media in which adhesive strips had been incubated, or directly on the adhesive. The adhesive was either laser-irradiated or not. Cells were stained after 48 hours with Trypan blue and the number of live and dead cells was recorded for cell viability.

Results

Murine and human fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesives with no apparent morphological changes or any exclusion zone. Cell numbers of murine fibroblasts were not significantly different when cultured in media that was extracted from irradiated (86 ± 7%) and non-irradiated adhesive (89 ± 4%). A similar result was obtained for the human fibroblasts.

Conclusions

These findings support that the RB–chitosan films induced negligible toxicity and growth retardation in murine and human fibroblasts. Lasers Surg. Med. 44: 762–768, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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