Hepatic artery thrombosis following orthotopic liver transplantation: A 10-year experience from a single centre in the United Kingdom

Authors

  • Michael A. Silva,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • Periyathambi S. Jambulingam,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • Bridget K. Gunson,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • David Mayer,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • John A.C. Buckels,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • Darius F. Mirza,

    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
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  • Simon R. Bramhall

    Corresponding author
    1. Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    • The Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TH, United Kingdom
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    • Telephone: 44 121 627 2346; FAX: 44 121 414 1833


Abstract

Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) occurs in 3–9% of all liver transplants and acute graft loss is a possible sequelae. We present our experience in the management of HAT over a 10-year period. Prospectively collected data from April 1994 to April 2004 were analyzed. There were 1,257 liver transplants, 669 males, median age 51 (16–73) years. There were 61 (4.9%) cases of HAT. Early HAT occurred in 21 (1.8%). Thirty six had graft dysfunction, 11 required a regraft, and 14 died. Positive CMV serology in the donor, cold ischemia time, duration of operation, transfusions of more than 6 units of blood, and 15 units of plasma, an aortic conduit for arterial reconstruction, Roux-en-Y biliary reconstructions, regrafts and relaparotomy were associated with HAT. At multivariate analysis, type of biliary anastomosis was the only significant factor associated with HAT. Split or reduced liver graft were not risk factors for HAT. Number of hepatic arteries requiring multiple arterial anastomosis was not a risk for HAT. HAT resulted in a reduction in overall survival post liver transplantation. The incidence of HAT was 4.9%; with 1.8% early HAT and HAT impacted on survival. Surgical technique was not an aetiological factor for HAT. In conclusion, while a Roux-en-Y biliary reconstruction was an independent risk factor for HAT, cold ischemia and operative times, the use of blood and plasma and the use of aortic conduits in arterial reconstruction were associated with HAT. Regrafts and reoperation were also identified risk factors. Liver Transpl 12:146–151, 2006. © 2005 AASLD.

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