Epinephrine and phenylephrine pretreatments for preventing postreperfusion syndrome during adult liver transplantation

Authors

  • Ho-Geol Ryu,

    1. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
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  • Chul-Woo Jung,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehang-No, Jongno-Gu, Seoul, Korea 110-744
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    • Telephone: 82-2-2072-0640; FAX: 82-2-747-5639

  • Hyung-Chul Lee,

    1. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
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  • Youn-Joung Cho

    1. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
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  • This study was funded solely by the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine.

Abstract

Acute hypotension after reperfusion of the liver graft occurs frequently during liver transplantation. A randomized, prospective trial was performed to test the effects of epinephrine and phenylephrine pretreatments for attenuating postreperfusion syndrome (PRS). Ninety-three adult liver recipients were randomly allocated to receive an intravenous bolus of 10 μg of epinephrine, 100 μg of phenylephrine, or normal saline (the control group) at the time of graft reperfusion. The occurrence of PRS, the use of vasoactive drugs, and the postoperative courses were compared. The epinephrine and phenylephrine groups showed PRS less frequently (39% and 48%) than the control group (77%, P = 0.006) as well as higher mean arterial pressures (MAPs) immediately after reperfusion (P < 0.05). An overshoot of MAP was observed in one-third of the pretreated patients with minimal heart rate changes. Only 2 patients in each pretreatment group showed an increase in MAP that was greater than 20% of the baseline value. The intraoperative epinephrine and dopamine requirements were significantly lower in both pretreatment groups. Perioperative laboratory data, postoperative stays, and in-hospital mortality rates were similar for the 3 groups. In conclusion, pretreatment with 10 μg of epinephrine or 100 μg of phenylephrine significantly reduces the occurrence of PRS and vasopressor requirements without immediate or delayed adverse effects in adult liver transplantation. Liver Transpl, 2012. © 2012 AASLD.

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