Pregnancy outcomes after living donor liver transplantation: Results from a Japanese survey

Authors

  • Shoji Kubo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
    • Address reprint requests to Shoji Kubo, M.D., Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahimachi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585, Japan. E-mail: m7696493@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

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  • Shinji Uemoto,

    1. Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery and Transplantation, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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  • Hiroyuki Furukawa,

    1. Division of Gastroenterological and General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan
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  • Koji Umeshita,

    1. Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan
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  • Daisuke Tachibana,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan
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  • for the Japanese Liver Transplantation Society


  • There were no grants or financial support, and the authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Abstract

A national survey of pregnancy outcomes after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) was performed in Japan. Thirty-eight pregnancies in 30 recipients resulted in 31 live births (25 recipients), 3 artificial abortions in the first trimester (3 recipients), 1 spontaneous abortion (1 recipient), and 3 fetal deaths (3 recipients). After the exclusion of the 3 artificial abortions, there were 35 pregnancies in 27 recipients: pregnancy-induced hypertension developed during 6 pregnancies (5 recipients), fetal growth restriction developed during 7 pregnancies (6 recipients), acute rejection developed during 2 pregnancies (2 recipients), and ileus developed during 1 pregnancy (1 recipient). Preterm delivery (<37 weeks) occurred for 10 pregnancies (10 recipients), and cesarean delivery was performed for 12 pregnancies (12 recipients). After delivery, acute rejection developed in 3 recipients. Twelve neonates were born with low birth weights (<2500 g), and 4 of these 12 neonates had extremely low birth weights (<1500 g). Two neonates had congenital malformations. The pregnancy outcomes after LDLT were similar to those reported for cadaveric liver transplantation (LT). The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in recipients who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy was significantly higher than the incidence in recipients who were less than 33 years old at the diagnosis of pregnancy. The incidences of fetal growth restriction, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and extremely low birth weight were significantly higher in the early group (<3 years after transplantation) versus the late group (≥3 years after transplantation). In conclusion, it is necessary to pay careful attention to complications during pregnancy in recipients who become pregnant within 3 years of LT, particularly if the age at the diagnosis of pregnancy is ≥33 years. Liver Transpl 20:576-583, 2014. © 2014 AASLD.

The number of patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) has increased; therefore, the number of women of reproductive age undergoing LT has also increased. In the United States, recipients who become pregnant after organ transplantation are registered, and their statistics are regularly reported.[1-5] Many studies concerning pregnancy after LT have been reported by the UK Transplant Pregnancy Registry and transplantation centers.[6-22] Recent case-control studies and meta-analyses have shown that LT recipients and their infants have an increased risk of obstetric complications, although most pregnancy outcomes are favorable.[23, 24] Although the pregnancy outcomes for some recipients after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) have been reported in 1 study,[4] most participants in previous studies have been cadaveric LT recipients. Here, the results of a national survey of pregnancy outcomes after LDLT in Japan are presented and discussed.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

In Japan, data on LT, including LDLT and cadaveric LT, and the institutes (hospitals or medical centers) that perform LT are registered with the Japanese Liver Transplantation Society. By the end of 2011, 139 cadaveric LT procedures and 6503 LDLT procedures were registered with the society.[25] The Japanese Liver Transplantation Society performed a national survey of pregnancy outcomes after LDLT in Japan. The society sent questionnaires to the institutes and retrospectively assessed data on pregnancy outcomes after LT until May 2012. The questionnaires included information about LDLT, clinical courses of pregnancies and deliveries, and neonates.

Pregnancy-induced hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm Hg after 20 weeks of gestation in a woman with previously normal blood pressure.[26] Fetal growth restriction was defined as an estimated fetal weight < −1.5 standard deviations of the normal reference range. The fetal weight was estimated with formulas from ultrasound measurements based on neonatal specific gravities and volumes.[27] In 22 of the 23 recipients who received tacrolimus during pregnancy (25 of 29 pregnancies), consecutive serum trough levels of tacrolimus during pregnancy (at several times) were available, and the mean trough level was calculated. The pathological degree of acute rejection (the rejection activity index) was assessed according to the Banff classification.[28]

This study was approved by the ethics committee of the Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine (no. 1856) and was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki of 1996. Informed consent was obtained from the participants. No patient was excluded from the study because informed consent could not be obtained.

Statistics

To assess the relationships between complication rates during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes and the age at pregnancy and interval from LDLT to pregnancy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. In addition, areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The optimal age and interval cutoff values were determined with Youden's index (sensitivity + specificity − 1). Categorical variables were compared with the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. The Student t test was used to analyze differences in ages. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. All statistical data were generated with JMP 9.0 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC).

RESULTS

Recipient Characteristics

The study participants were 30 LT recipients who had 38 pregnancies (Fig. 1). The recipients underwent LDLT at 11 institutions. The indications for LDLT included congenital biliary atresia (14 recipients), acute liver failure (9 recipients), primary sclerosing cholangitis (2 recipients), autoimmune hepatitis (1 recipient), liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B virus (1 recipient), Budd-Chiari syndrome (1 recipient), familial amyloid polyneuropathy (1 recipient), and hepatocellular carcinoma (1 recipient; Table 1). The age of the recipients at the time of LDLT ranged from 4 to 38 years. The age at which pregnancy was diagnosed ranged from 22 to 41 years (mean = 30.3 years). The time from LDLT to the diagnosis of pregnancy ranged from 356 to 6798 days (median = 1751 days).

Table 1. Indications for LDLT
DiseasePatients (n)
Congenital biliary atresia14
Acute hepatic failure9
Primary sclerosing cholangitis2
Autoimmune hepatitis1
Hepatitis B virus1
Budd-Chiari syndrome1
Familial amyloid polyneuropathy1
Hepatocellular carcinoma1
Figure 1.

Subjects of this study. *In one recipient, artificial abortion was performed at the first pregnancy, and the second pregnancy was resulted in fetal death. †Six recipients had live births twice.

At the diagnosis of pregnancy, tacrolimus was being administered to 23 recipients (27 pregnancies); cyclosporine was being administered to 2 recipients (2 pregnancies); a combination of tacrolimus and steroids was being administered to 2 recipients (2 pregnancies); a combination of cyclosporine and sirolimus was being administered to 1 recipient (1 pregnancy); and a combination of tacrolimus, steroids, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was being administered to 1 recipient (1 pregnancy). The mean trough level of tacrolimus at the diagnosis of pregnancy was 4.5 ng/mL (range = 0.9-10.0 ng/mL), and the mean trough level during pregnancy was 4.5 ng/mL (range = 1.5-10.0 ng/mL). No immunosuppressive drugs were administered during 3 pregnancies at the time of the pregnancy diagnosis because of auxiliary partial orthotopic LT (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient) or the discontinuation of drugs after LDLT in childhood (2 pregnancies in 1 recipient). The serum creatinine levels at the diagnosis of pregnancy were available for 32 pregnancies (24 recipients), and they were within the reference range.

Pregnancy Outcomes

Thirty-eight pregnancies in 30 recipients resulted in 31 live births (81.6%) for 25 recipients, 3 artificial abortions for 3 recipients, 1 spontaneous abortion for 1 recipient, and 3 fetal deaths for 3 recipients (Fig. 1). Artificial abortions were performed in the first trimester because of MMF use in 1 pregnancy (1 recipient), sirolimus use in 1 pregnancy (1 recipient), and a short time after LDLT (356 days) in 1 pregnancy (1 recipient).

Obstetric Complications

After the exclusion of the 3 artificial abortions in 3 recipients, there were 35 pregnancies in 27 recipients: a spontaneous abortion occurred during 1 pregnancy (2.9%) in 1 recipient, and fetal death occurred during 3 pregnancies (8.6%) in 3 recipients as previously described (Table 2). Pregnancy-induced hypertension developed during 6 pregnancies (17.1%) in 5 recipients, fetal growth restriction developed during 7 pregnancies (20.0%) in 6 recipients, and ileus developed during 1 pregnancy in 1 recipient. Liver dysfunction [elevated serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and/or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP)] was detected during 4 pregnancies in 4 recipients. Acute rejection, diagnosed by liver biopsy (rejection activity index = 2) and laboratory test results, occurred in 2 of these 4 recipients; an increased dose of cyclosporine and steroid pulse therapy was given to 1 recipient, and an increased dose of tacrolimus was administered to 1 recipient. Other obstetric complications such as gestational diabetes, infections, placental abruption, and thromboembolic disorders did not occur in any recipient. Two recipients did not receive immunosuppressive drugs, and for the one who underwent auxiliary partial orthotopic LT, fetal death occurred because of umbilical cord coiling. In another patient (2 pregnancies), no complications developed during pregnancy.

Table 2. Interval From LDLT to Pregnancy and Delivery Outcomes
OutcomeTotalIntervalP Value
<3 Years≥3 Years
  1. NOTE: There were 35 pregnancies in 27 recipients (3 pregnancies in 3 recipients ended by artificial abortions were excluded from the analysis).

  2. a

    The data are reported as medians and ranges.

  3. b

    There were 10 pregnancies in the <3-year group and 25 pregnancies in the ≥3-year group.

  4. c

    There were 8 pregnancies in the <3-year group and 23 pregnancies in the ≥3-year group (4 pregnancies in 4 recipients ending in a spontaneous abortion or fetal death were excluded from the analysis).

Age at pregnancy (years)a27 (22-41)35 (24-41)29 (22-40)0.0014
Indications for LT (n)   0.327
Congenital biliary atresia16313 
Acute hepatic failure1248 
Primary sclerosing cholangitis110 
Other624 
Complications during pregnancy [n (%)]b    
Spontaneous abortion1 (2.9)01 (4.0)>0.999
Fetal death3 (8.6)2 (20.0)1 (4.0)0.190
Fetal growth restriction7 (20)5 (50.0)2 (8.0)0.0120
Liver dysfunction4 (11.4)2 (20.0)2 (8.0)0.561
Pregnancy-induced hypertension6 (17.1)5 (50.0)1 (4.0)0.0040
Delivery outcomes [n (%)]c    
Preterm delivery10 (32.3)4 (50.0)6 (26.1)0.381
Cesarean delivery12 (38.7)4 (50.0)8 (34.8)0.676
Low birth weight (<2500 g)12 (38.7)5 (62.5)7 (30.4)0.206
Extremely low birth weight (<1500 g)4 (12.9)3 (37.5)1 (4.3)0.0432
Birth defects2 (6.5)1 (12.5)1 (4.3)0.456

In 1 of the 8 recipients who were pregnant twice, the second pregnancy resulted in a spontaneous abortion (at 7 weeks of gestation), although the first pregnancy was uneventful. Another recipient had pregnancy-induced hypertension in both the first and second pregnancies; fetal death ended the first pregnancy (at 25 weeks), and fetal growth restriction occurred during the second pregnancy.

Delivery Outcomes

There were 31 pregnancies in 27 recipients, and preterm delivery (<37 weeks) occurred for 10 of these pregnancies (32.3%) in 10 recipients. Cesarean delivery was performed for 12 pregnancies (38.7%) in 12 recipients because of pregnancy-induced hypertension (6 pregnancies in 6 recipients), hypotonic contraction during labor (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient), transient bradycardia of the fetus (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient), ileus (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient), previous multiple abdominal operations (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient), previous cesarean delivery (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient), and the recipient's will (1 pregnancy in 1 recipient).

After delivery, liver dysfunction (elevated serum activities of AST, ALT, and/or γ-GTP) occurred during 4 pregnancies (4 recipients), and acute rejection, diagnosed by liver biopsy (rejection activity index = 2-4), occurred within 4 months of LDLT in 3 of these 4 recipients. For acute rejection, steroid pulse therapy was administered to 2 recipients, and a steroid and MMF were added to tacrolimus therapy for 1 recipient (Fig. 2). The recipients' liver function improved with these treatments. In 1 recipient, artificial respiration was necessary because of acute respiratory distress syndrome after delivery, and renal dysfunction persisted after recovery. Puerperal fever developed in 1 recipient. The pregnancy-induced hypertension improved after delivery in all recipients who had hypertension during pregnancy. In 1 recipient, retransplantation was performed because of the recurrence of primary sclerosing cholangitis 5 years after delivery.

Figure 2.

Clinical course of recipients suffering acute rejection after delivery. Acute rejection was diagnosed with a second liver biopsy (rejection activity index = 4).

There were 31 live births, and neonatal asphyxia occurred in 1 neonate. Twelve neonates were born with low birth weights (<2500 g), and 4 of the 12 low-birth-weight neonates were born with extremely low birth weights (<1500 g). Although intracranial bleeding developed after delivery in 1 neonate with an extremely low birth weight, the condition improved without complications.

One neonate had tetralogy of Fallot, and 1 neonate had hypospadias.

Risk Factors for Obstetric Complications, Delivery Outcomes, and Birth Defects

Relationships between the mean trough level of tacrolimus and obstetric complications, delivery outcomes, and birth defects were not found.

Relationships between the age at the diagnosis of pregnancy and complications during pregnancy were studied with ROC curves. The AUC was 0.784 (95% CI = 0.613-0.905) for pregnancy-induced hypertension (Fig. 3A). The optimal cutoff value was 33 years (sensivitity = 83.3%, specificity = 69.0%). No significant relationship was found between the age at pregnancy and other complications such as spontaneous abortion, fetal death, fetal growth restriction, and liver dysfunction. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in recipients who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy was significantly higher than the incidence in recipients who were less than 33 years old at the diagnosis of pregnancy (P value = 0.0278 according to Fisher's exact test).

Figure 3.

ROC curves for pregnant recipients: (A) age at the diagnosis of pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertension, (B) interval from LT to pregnancy and fetal growth restriction, (C) interval from LT to pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertension, and (D) interval from LT to pregnancy and extremely low birth weight.

Relationships between the interval from LDLT to pregnancy and delivery outcomes were studied with ROC curves. The AUC was 0.801 (95% CI = 0.632-0.916) for fetal growth restriction (Fig. 3B). The optimal cutoff value was 1096 days (sensitivity = 71.4%, specificity = 82.1%). The AUC was 0.822 (95% CI = 0.656-0.930) for pregnancy-induced hypertension (Fig. 3C). The optimal cutoff value was 1096 days (sensitivity = 83.3%, specificity = 82.8%). The AUC was 0.759 (95% CI = 0.573-0.893) for extremely low birth weight (Fig. 3D). The optimal cutoff value was 1096 days (sensitivity = 75.0, specificity = 81.5%). No significant relationship was found between the interval and other factors, including spontaneous abortion, fetal death, liver dysfunction, and preterm delivery.

The obstetric complications and delivery outcomes were compared for 10 pregnancies for which the interval from LT to pregnancy was <3 years (the early group) and 25 pregnancies for which this interval was ≥3 years (the late group) because the optimal cutoff value was 1096 days according to the analysis using ROC curves (Table 2). The 3 pregnancies for which artificial abortions were performed in the first trimester were excluded from this comparison. The mean age at pregnancy was significantly higher for the early group versus the late group. The proportions of recipients with fetal growth restriction and pregnancy-induced hypertension were significantly higher in the early group versus the late group. The proportion of neonates with extremely low birth weight was significantly higher in the early group versus the late group.

The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in recipients in the early group who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy (5/8 pregnancies or 62.5%) was significantly higher than the incidence in recipients in the late group who were less than 33 years old at the diagnosis of pregnancy (1/19 pregnancies or 5.3%, P = 0.0037) and the incidence in recipients in the late group who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy (0/6 pregnancies, P = 0.031); the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was highest in recipients in the early group who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy (interval from LDLT to pregnancy < 3 years).

DISCUSSION

An increased risk of complications, including prematurity, low birth weight, pregnancy-induced hypertension, renal dysfunction, and cesarean delivery, has been reported in previous studies of pregnancy in LT recipients (most patients have undergone cadaveric LT).[1-24]

In this study, pregnancy-induced hypertension developed during 6 pregnancies (17.1%) in 5 recipients. Shiozaki et al.[29] reported that pregnancy-induced hypertension was present in 1.2% of pregnancies (2802/241,292) in the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Genecology database. The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension seems to be higher in LDLT recipients versus the general population. Several studies have reported that pregnancy-induced hypertension is common among LT recipients (11%-43%).[1, 3-6, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 23, 24] The incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in LDLT recipients (17.1%) was similar to the incidence in cadaveric LT recipients. On the other hand, pregnancy-induced hypertension did not occur in 1 recipient (2 pregnancies) who did not receive immunosuppressive drugs during pregnancy. This complication has been shown to occur more frequently in LT recipients with renal dysfunction.[11, 12] Although no relationship between the mean trough levels of tacrolimus and pregnancy-induced hypertension was observed in this study, underlying renal dysfunction[11] and the vasoconstrictive effects of calcineurin inhibitors may affect hypertension. In addition, it is necessary to pay attention when the recipient's age at the diagnosis of pregnancy is ≥33 years.

In this study, a spontaneous abortion ended 1 pregnancy (1 recipient), and fetal death ended 3 pregnancies (3 recipients). Coffin et al.[23] reported that infants of LT recipients had a 3-fold risk of complications, most notably fetal death (6% versus 2% in controls). Among 241 pregnancies in LT recipients described in the National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry in 2008,[3] 19.2% and 2.1% ended in spontaneous abortions and stillbirths, respectively. The maternal and fetal conditions might affect the rates of spontaneous abortion and fetal death. Another adverse fetal outcome noted in this study was fetal growth restriction in 7 pregnancies (20.0%). The incidence of complications appears to be higher in these individuals versus the general population.[23] However, the mechanisms underlying the high incidences of spontaneous abortion, fetal death, and fetal growth restriction are unclear.

Several previous studies have reported a high incidence of preterm delivery (14%-53%).[1, 3-6, 8-10, 13, 14, 17, 18, 20, 23, 24] In this study, preterm delivery (<37 weeks) occurred in 10 pregnancies (32.3%). The proportion of preterm deliveries seemed to be high because the database of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Genecology indicated that the rate of threatened premature delivery was 2.34%.[30] Preterm delivery might be related to maternal conditions such as hypertension and fetal conditions such as fetal growth restriction.

Several previous studies have shown that cesarean delivery is more common among transplant recipients.[4-6, 10, 13, 15-17, 20, 23, 24] In this study, cesarean delivery was performed for 12 of 31 pregnancies (38.7%). The indications for cesarean delivery included pregnancy-induced hypertension, hypotonic contraction during labor, transient bradycardia, ileus, multiple previous abdominal operations, previous cesarean delivery, and the recipient's will. Thus, it is likely that the high rate of cesarean delivery was attributable to pregnancy complications rather than LT itself.

Acute rejection is an important problem during and after pregnancy because rejection may induce graft loss. In fact, the National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry (2006) reported that 7% of pregnancies were complicated by acute rejection, and 8% of individuals lost their grafts within 2 years of delivery.[1] Other studies have reported that rejection rates during pregnancy are 0% to 17%.[2-6, 9, 10, 13, 15-17, 20, 23] It has been reported that rejection episodes up to 3 months after delivery are a risk factor for graft loss after delivery.[5, 7] Kainz et al.[31] reported that rejection was followed by preeclampsia, renal impairment, and infection. In this study, acute rejection occurred in 2 recipients during pregnancy and in 3 recipients after delivery (within 4 months of delivery), although these patients had no renal dysfunction. All recipients were successfully treated with an increased dose of tacrolimus and/or the addition of corticosteroids or MMF, and graft loss did not occur. Thus, adequate treatment for acute rejection can prevent graft loss, although close follow-up of pregnant recipients is necessary even after delivery, especially when the recipients have renal dysfunction.

Congenital malformations in live-born neonates have been reported to occur in 3% of the nontransplant population.[32] In transplant recipients, the incidence of congenital malformations has been reported to be 4% with corticosteroids,[32] 7% with azathioprine,[32] 3% with cyclosporine,[33] and 4% with tacrolimus.[14] Kainz et al.[31] reported that 4 neonates presented with malformations among 100 pregnancies in which the mother was treated with tacrolimus. In the present series, most recipients received tacrolimus-based therapy, and 2 of the 31 neonates (6.4%) had congenital malformations (tetralogy of Fallot and hypospadias). A higher incidence of structural malformations was observed with MMF exposure during pregnancy.[34] This agent is classified as pregnancy category D (there is positive evidence of fatal risk to humans, but potential benefits may warrant the use of the drug in pregnant women despite the potential risk; there is evidence of fetal risk).[35] No structural defects have been reported with early-pregnancy sirolimus exposure to date. In this study, artificial abortions were performed in 2 recipients to whom MMF or sirolimus was administered. Calcineurin inhibitors are classified as pregnancy category C (animal reproductive studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus or are lacking, and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but the potential benefits may warrant the use of the drug in pregnant women despite the potential risks; fetal risk cannot be ruled out).[35] Thus, calcineurin inhibitor–based therapy, including cyclosporine and tacrolimus, is favorable for pregnant recipients.

Although there is no established optimal interval between LT and pregnancy, a report from the National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry and the American Society of Transplantation recommended that LT recipients wait a minimum of 1 year before conception to stabilize graft function and immunosuppressant dosage. Christopher et al.[16] reported that pregnancies occurring within 1 year of LT had an increased incidence of prematurity, low birth weight, and acute rejection in comparison with those occurring more than 1 year after LT. Nagy et al.[15] reported that the risk of complications during pregnancy is low when liver LT recipients become pregnant more than 2 years after LT because the recipients have stable and normal hepatic function and normal renal function, and immunosuppressive therapy is at a maintenance dosage. The results of the National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry (2008) showed that the incidence of very-low-birth-weight neonates in pregnancies within 2 years of LT was higher than the incidence in pregnancies more than 5 years after LT.[3] A higher incidence of rejection was also reported for recipients who were pregnant 1 to 2 years after LT. These results indicate better outcomes for recipients and infants with pregnancies occurring at least 2 years after LT. In this study, the incidences of fetal growth restriction, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and neonates with extremely low birth weights were significantly higher in the early group (<3 years after LDLT) versus the late group (≥3 years after LDLT). In addition, the incidence of pregnancy-induced hypertension was higher for recipients who were 33 years old or older at the diagnosis of pregnancy versus recipients who were less than 33 years old. Thus, it is necessary to pay careful attention to complications during pregnancy when a recipient becomes pregnant within 3 years of LDLT, particularly if the age at the diagnosis of pregnancy is ≥33 years.

The pregnancy outcomes of LDLT recipients were similar to those of cadaveric LT recipients. Although most pregnancy outcomes are favorable, special attention should be given to obstetric complications such as pregnancy-induced hypertension, spontaneous abortion, fetal death, fetal growth restriction, preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, and acute rejection. It is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from this study because the number of recipients in this study was too small, and this survey might not reflect all pregnant recipients. Thus, it is necessary to analyze the outcomes after pregnancy in larger studies with prospective registration to establish and improve the clinical management of pregnancy in LT recipients.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The authors thank Shintato Yagi and Akira Mori (Kyoto University), Tomoharu Yoshizumi and Toru Ikegami (Kyushu University), Toshihiko Ikegami (Shinshu University), Yorihisa Urata (Osaka City University), Hiroyuki Sugo and Noboru Nakayama (Juntendo University), Ikuo Takeda (Tohoku University), Tsuyoshi Shimamura (Hokkaido University), Hiroyuki Takamura (Kanazawa University), Mitsuhisa Takatsuki (Nagasaki University), Yoshinobu Sato and Takashi Kobayashi (Niigata University), and Takayuki Takeichi (Kumamoto University) for their assistance with the data collection.

Abbreviations
γ-GTP

gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase

ALT

alanine aminotransferase

AST

aspartate aminotransferase

AUC

area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

CI

confidence interval

LDLT

living donor liver transplantation

LT

liver transplantation

MMF

mycophenolate mofetil

ROC

receiver operating characteristic

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