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Functionalization of Nanofibrillated Cellulose with Silver Nanoclusters: Fluorescence and Antibacterial Activity

Authors

  • Isabel Díez,

    1. Molecular Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (formerly Helsinki University of Technology), P.O. Box 15100, FIN-02150 Espoo, Finland
    2. Current address: Liquid Crystals and Polymers Group, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, C./Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009, Zaragoza, Spain
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  • Paula Eronen,

    1. Forest Products Surface Chemistry Group, Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo, Finland
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  • Monika Österberg,

    1. Forest Products Surface Chemistry Group, Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo, Finland
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  • Markus B. Linder,

    1. VTT Technical Research Center of Finland, Biotechnology, Tietotie 2, FIN-02044, Espoo, Finland
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  • Olli Ikkala,

    1. Molecular Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (formerly Helsinki University of Technology), P.O. Box 15100, FIN-02150 Espoo, Finland
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  • Robin H. A. Ras

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (formerly Helsinki University of Technology), P.O. Box 15100, FIN-02150 Espoo, Finland
    • Molecular Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (formerly Helsinki University of Technology), P.O. Box 15100, FIN-02150 Espoo, Finland.
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Abstract

Native cellulose nanofibers are functionalized using luminescent metal nanoclusters to form a novel type of functional nanocellulose/nanocluster composite. Previously, various types of cellulose fibers have been functionalized with large, non-luminescent metal nanoparticles. Here, mechanically strong native cellulose nanofibers, also called nanofibrillatedcellulose (NFC), microfibrillatedcellulose (MFC) ornanocellulose, disintegrated from macroscopic cellulose pulp fibers are used as support for small and fluorescent silver nanoclusters. The functionalization occurs in a supramolecular manner, mediated by poly(methacrylic acid) that protects nanoclusters while it allows hydrogen bonding with cellulose, leading to composites with fluorescence and antibacterial activity.

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