Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 5

Special Issue: Micro- and Nanocapsules for Biological and Biomedical Applications

May 14, 2010

Volume 10, Issue 5

Pages 459–554

Issue edited by: Jan C. M. van Hest

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 5/2010

      Mihaela Delcea, Alexey Yashchenok, Kristina Videnova, Oliver Kreft, Helmuth Möhwald and Andre G. Skirtach

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201090006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: Micro- and nanocapsules can be used as intracellular and in vivo delivery vehicles; here multicompartmental capsules are envisioned to represent the next generation of carriers. Such constructs allow simultaneous delivery of several biomolecules, and basic building block structures are described. Further details can be found in the feature article by M. Delcea,* A. Yashchenok, K. Videnova, O. Kreft, H. Möhwald, and A. G. Skirtach*on page 465.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 5/2010 (pages 459–462)

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201090007

  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Multicompartmental Micro- and Nanocapsules: Hierarchy and Applications in Biosciences (pages 465–474)

      Mihaela Delcea, Alexey Yashchenok, Kristina Videnova, Oliver Kreft, Helmuth Möhwald and Andre G. Skirtach

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900359

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multicompartmentalization strategies for micro- and nanocapsules are overviewed and the road-map of future directions in the field is outlined. Multicompartment structures are implemented by the incorporation of micro- and nano- sub-compartments into, or their absorption onto, larger particles and capsules. An enzyme-catalyzed reaction inside the microcapsules is monitored. Applications of multicompartment micro- and nanocapsules in bioscience are accentuated.

  5. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Preparation of Biodegradable Liquid Core PLLA Microcapsules and Hollow PLLA Microcapsules Using Microfluidics (pages 475–480)

      Dennis Lensen, Kevin van Breukelen, Dennis M. Vriezema and Jan C. M. van Hest

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900404

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      Biodegradable core-shell poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microcapsules are prepared using microfluidics. This technique affords the convenient production of biodegradable PLLA capsules filled with a liquid organic core. In combination with lyophilization, hollow biodegradable PLLA capsules can also be prepared. Both types of particles have great potential in the field of drug delivery.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Molecular Recognition Induced Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymers: Microspheres to Vesicles (pages 481–487)

      Oktay Uzun, Amitav Sanyal, Youngdo Jeong and Vincent M. Rotello

      Version of Record online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900455

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The diblock copolymers with diamidopyridine give highly organized microstructures, when they are mixed with the complementary thymine functionalized monoblock copolymers. These microspheres can be efficiently crosslinked via photochemical [2πs + 2πs] cycloaddition with the resultant morphology change into vesicular structures. Through choice of block structure and length a wide variety of solution-phase structures and microstructured solids have been produced.

    2. Peptide Nucleic Acid Films and Capsules: Assembly and Enzymatic Degradation (pages 488–495)

      Alisa L. Becker, Angus P. R. Johnston and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900347

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sequence-directed hybridization of nucleic acids provides a high level of control for the bottom-up assembly of nanostructured materials. Here, we outline a novel approach to the preparation of films and capsules based on hybridization of the nucleic acid analogue peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PNA multilayer films and capsules are resistant to degradation by both proteases and nucleases, while retaining the advantages of sequence-directed assembly.

    3. Synthesis and Crosslinking of L-DOPA Containing Polypeptide Vesicles (pages 496–502)

      Eric P. Holowka and Timothy J. Deming

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900390

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      Stable vesicles, with size controlled by extrusion, were formed by assembly of amphiphilic diblock copolypeptides containing DOPA in the hydrophobic domains. Vesicles formed for a range of copolymer compositions and DOPA residues were readily covalently crosslinked by oxidation, in a process similar to the crosslinking of mussel adhesive proteins, giving vesicles with dramatically improved membrane stability against environmental stresses.

    4. In vitro and In vivo Evaluation of Docetaxel Loaded Biodegradable Polymersomes (pages 503–512)

      Kamal K. Upadhyay, Anant N. Bhatt, Emilio Castro, Anil K. Mishra, Krishna Chuttani, Bilikere S. Dwarakanath, Christophe Schatz, Jean-François Le Meins, Ambikanandan Misra and Sébastien Lecommandoux

      Version of Record online: 15 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900415

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Docetaxel loaded poly(γ-benzyl L-glutamate)-block-hyaluronan polymersomes were prepared by self-assembly. These polymer vesicles showed high stability, good loading capacity and a controlled release behaviour over several days. In vitro toxicity, in vivo biodistribution and cancer targeting experiments demonstrated significantly improved capabilities compared to the docetaxel commercial formulation, making this system very attractive for improved cancer therapy.

    5. Efficient Encapsulation of Plasmid DNA in pH-Sensitive PMPC–PDPA Polymersomes: Study of the Effect of PDPA Block Length on Copolymer–DNA Binding Affinity (pages 513–530)

      Hannah Lomas, Jianzhong Du, Irene Canton, Jeppe Madsen, Nicholas Warren, Steven P. Armes, Andrew L. Lewis and Giuseppe Battaglia

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201000083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pH-sensitive diblock copolymer, PMPC-b-PDPA, is able to form a complex with plasmid DNA (pDNA) at endocytic pH and encapsulate pDNA within polymersomes at physiological pH. We report the effect of PDPA block length on the strength of the copolymer–DNA electrostatic interaction and the subsequent effect on the pDNA loading efficiency within polymersomes.

    6. SOD Antioxidant Nanoreactors: Influence of Block Copolymer Composition on the Nanoreactor Efficiency (pages 531–538)

      Ozana Onaca, David W. Hughes, Vimalkumar Balasubramanian, Mariusz Grzelakowski, Wolfgang Meier and Cornelia G. Palivan

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.200900379

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have studied how the antioxidant nanoreactor based on superoxide dismutase encapsulated in amphiphilic block copolymer vesicles depends on the copolymer composition. The encapsulation efficiency and the membrane permeability are affected by the vesicles size and the length of the hydrophobic blocks of the copolymers, serving to improve its efficiency for therapeutic applications.

    7. Complex Assembly Behavior During the Encapsulation of Green Fluorescent Protein Analogs in Virus Derived Protein Capsules (pages 539–545)

      Inge J. Minten, Roeland J. M. Nolte and Jeroen J. L. M. Cornelissen

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201000030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A green fluorescent protein could be efficiently encapsulated in the CCMV derived protein capsid, by non-covalently attaching it to the capsid proteins with coiled-coils. This paper focuses on the underlying assembly mechanism, which proves to be more complicated than expected. The EGFP–capsid protein complex seems to undergo a pH-induced disassembly and a concentration and ratio depended dimerization.

    8. Ultrasonically Induced Release from Nanosized Polymer Vesicles (pages 546–554)

      Gautam D. Pangu, Kevin P. Davis, Frank S. Bates and Daniel A. Hammer

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201000081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanosized polymer vesicles were made from the block co-polymer OB-29, polyethylene oxide polybutadiene, and exposed to ultrasound of 5.5 W. A and B are cryo-TEM images of vesicles before (A) and after (B) sonication, indicating that vesicles remained largely intact and that release resulted from transient poration. Panel C illustrates the percent release as a function of time and sonication field strength for OB-29 vesicles.

  7. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 5/2010

      Kamal K. Upadhyay, Anant N. Bhatt, Emilio Castro, Anil K. Mishra, Krishna Chuttani, Bilikere S. Dwarakanath, Christophe Schatz, Jean-François Le Meins, Ambikanandan Misra and Sébastien Lecommandoux

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201090008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Docetaxel-loaded polypeptide-block-polysaccharide polymersomes were prepared combining “click” reactions and self-assembly. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated improved capabilities of polymer vesicles compared to docetaxel commercial formulation, making this system very attractive for improved cancer therapy. Further details can be found in the full paper by K. K. Upadhyay, A. N. Bhatt, E. Castro, A. K. Mishra,* K. Chuttani, B. S. Dwarakanath,* C. Schatz, J.-F. Le Meins, A. Misra,* and S. Lecommandoux*on page 503.

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