Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 10

October 10, 2011

Volume 11, Issue 10

Pages 1287–1442

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2011

      Kyoung Je Cha, Kwang-Sook Park, Sun-Woong Kang, Byung-Hyun Cha, Bong-Kee Lee, In-Bo Han, Dong Ah Shin, Dong Sung Kim and Soo-Hong Lee

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190028

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      Front Cover: The cover depicts the fabrication process of polystyrene substrates with lotus leaf surface structure (LLSS), which has been replicated by a hot embossing process with a nickel mold insert transcribed from the natural lotus leaf. Compared to the flat substrate, adipose-derived stem cells on the LLSS substrate exhibited different properties, such as attachment, morphology, and even differentiation. Further details can be found in the article by K. J. Cha, K.-S. Park, S.-W. Kang, B.-H. Cha, B.-K. Lee, I.-B. Han, D. A. Shin, D. S. Kim,* and S.-H. Lee*on page 1357.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2011

      Suwan N. Jayasinghe, Gary Warnes and Chris J. Scotton

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190029

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      Back Cover: The cover features investigations that elucidate the capacity to either bio-electrospray or cell-electrospin cells with a matrix for the direct formation of composite, fully functional architectures in three dimensions. The living architectures were found to integrate with the host's microenvironment without causing any negative effects. These and other studies position both of these electrified biotechniques as front-running approaches for the formation of functional tissues for repairing, replacing, and rejuvenating damaged or ageing tissues and/or organs. Further details can be found in the article by S. N. Jayasinghe,* G. Warnes, and C. J. Scotton on page 1364.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2011 (pages 1287–1291)

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190027

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Physical Hydrogels: New Vista on a Long Serving Biomaterial (pages 1293–1313)

      Marie-Helene Alves, Bettina E. B. Jensen, Anton A. A. Smith and Alexander N. Zelikin

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100145

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      Poly(vinyl alcohol) physical hydrogels offer unique possibilities in the design of biomaterials. This can be achieved using modern tools of macromolecular design and employing nanoscale control over polymer chemistry to define microscale supramolecular association of polymer chains and thus rationally design macroscopic properties of materials.

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. How to Integrate Biological Motors towards Bio-Actuators Fueled by ATP (pages 1314–1324)

      Arif Md. Rashedul Kabir, Akira Kakugo, Jian Ping Gong and Yoshihito Osada

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100060

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      Biomolecular motors are being considered as promising materials for constructing artificial bio-machines. One of the challenges is the integration of the structural organization of molecular motors into a hierarchical level. This article emphasizes the self-organization of biomolecular motors to achieve a biomotor-based artificial machine.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. In Situ Forming Physical Hydrogels for Three-dimensional Tissue Morphogenesis (pages 1325–1330)

      Yang Liu, Bo Liu, Jeremiah J. Riesberg and Wei Shen

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100119

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      In situ forming physical hydrogels are formed through a Michael-type addition reaction between a 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol)–vinyl sulfone and a thiol-carrying, multi-arm macromer self-assembled through a coiled-coil. The hydrogels contain physical junctions undergoing reversible dissociation and re-association, allowing 3D cell movement and consequently epithelial cyst formation without the need for material degradation.

    2. PEGylated Anti-MUC1 Aptamer-Doxorubicin Complex for Targeted Drug Delivery to MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells (pages 1331–1335)

      Lihan Tan, Koon Gee Neoh, En-Tang Kang, Woo Seok Choe and Xiaodi Su

      Version of Record online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100173

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      DOX intercalates APT without significantly affecting either the cytotoxicity of DOX or the targeting efficacy of APT. The PEGylated APT-DOX complex presents significant cytotoxicity against MUC1-overexpressing breast cancer cells (MCF7), while minimizing adverse impact on the macrophages RAW 264.7. Thus, the PEG-APT-DOX complex can potentially be used to combat MUC1-expressing cancers.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. In Vivo Biocompatibility of Three Potential Intraperitoneal Implants (pages 1336–1345)

      Sylvie Defrère, Mélanie Mestagdt, Raphaël Riva, Fabrice Krier, Anne Van Langendonckt, Pierre Drion, Christine Jérôme, Brigitte Evrard, Jean-Paul Dehoux, Jean-Michel Foidart and Jacques Donnez

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100077

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      This study demonstrates the intraperitoneal biocompatibility of three polymers, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (PEVA), placed in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys, making them suitable for the design of intraperitoneal drug delivery systems, which may be of great interest for pathologies confined to the peritoneal cavity.

    2. Mammalian Cell Viability in Electrospun Composite Nanofiber Structures (pages 1346–1356)

      Mehmet Fatih Canbolat, Christina Tang, Susan H. Bernacki, Behnam Pourdeyhimi and Saad Khan

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100108

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      We study two approaches to incorporate live mammalian cells into nanofibrous structures, cell electrospinning, and cell layering. While cells die in cell electrospinning, most survive cell layering. Fiber stretching and dehydration are the main factors affecting cell viability in cell electrospinning. In cell layering, residual solution affects cell viability; highest viability occurs using HFIP.

    3. Effect of Replicated Polymeric Substrate with Lotus Surface Structure on Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Behaviors (pages 1357–1363)

      Kyoung Je Cha, Kwang-Sook Park, Sun-Woong Kang, Byung-Hyun Cha, Bong-Kee Lee, In-Bo Han, Dong Ah Shin, Dong Sung Kim and Soo-Hong Lee

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100134

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      Surface topography with micro and nano-sized structures can alter cellular behaviors. Polymeric substrates with lotus leaf surface structure (LLSS) are fabricated by polymer molding technique and behaviors of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are investigated on them. By comparing with the flat substrate, we show that LLSS effect on the attachment, morphology, and differentiation of ASCs.

    4. Bio-electrosprayed Living Composite Matrix Implanted into Mouse Models (pages 1364–1369)

      Suwan N. Jayasinghe, Gary Warnes and Chris J. Scotton

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100131

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      Bio-electrosprayed and cell electrospun tissues integrate following implantation into mouse models. The studies presented here demonstrate the ability to explore these novel techniques for directly forming three-dimensional, fully functional tissues. Living architectures such as these have several applications spanning from basic biology to clinical medicine.

    5. Poly(methyl malate) Nanoparticles: Formation, Degradation, and Encapsulation of Anticancer Drugs (pages 1370–1377)

      Alberto Lanz-Landázuri, Montserrat García-Alvarez, José Portilla-Arias, Antxon Martínez de Ilarduya, Rameshwar Patil, Eggehard Holler, Julia Y. Ljubimova and Sebastián Muñoz-Guerra

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100107

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      Nanoparticles of poly(β,L-malic acid) methyl ester with average diameters of 150–250nm are prepared by emulsion evaporation. They degrade under physiological conditions, producing L-malic acid and methanol as the final products. When used as drug delivery system, doxorubicin is steadily released from the NPs over 1 month, whereas temozolomide is fully liberated in a few hours.

    6. Topography-Induced Cell Adhesion to Acr-sP(EO-stat-PO) Hydrogels: The Role of Protein Adsorption (pages 1378–1386)

      Vera A. Schulte, Mar Diez, Martin Möller and Marga C. Lensen

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100087

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      The fact that fibroblasts do adhere to PEG-based hydrogels when their surface is topographically patterned is investigated and the underlying (bio)chemical and (bio)physical factors are studied systematically. Two important findings are reported: (i) the protein vitronectin is able to adsorb to the PEG surface, and (ii) in combination with surface topography this leads to strong cell adhesion.

    7. Stable Cellulose Nanospheres for Cellular Uptake (pages 1387–1392)

      Tim Liebert, Marc Kostag, Jana Wotschadlo and Thomas Heinze

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100113

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      The cellular uptake of stable spherical cellulose nanoparticles into cells is studied. The nanoparticles are covalently labeled with the fluorescence dye FITC and treated with human fibroblast cultures. Confocal laser scanning microcopy is applied to verify that the nanoparticles are located inside the cell. Fast cellular uptake is found without transfection reagents or attachment of a receptor molecule.

    8. Thermoresponsive Gene Carriers Based on Polyethylenimine-graft-Poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] (pages 1393–1406)

      Rui Zhang, Yang Wang, Fu-Sheng Du, Ying-Li Wang, Ying-Xia Tan, Shou-Ping Ji and Zi-Chen Li

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100094

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      TCPs containing branched PEI 25K as the cationic segment and poly(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA475) as the TP are synthesized. They can bind pDNA to form polyplexes whose positive surface charge is partially shielded by the TP block below its LCST. Upon heating above the LCST, the TP blocks dehydrate and collapse to expose more positive charges, which may account for the enhanced tranfection efficiency induced by non-situ hyperthermic treatment.

    9. Amylose's Recognition of Chirality in Polylactides on Formation of Inclusion Complexes in Vine-Twining Polymerization (pages 1407–1415)

      Yoshiro Kaneko, Koji Ueno, Toshifumi Yui, Keisuke Nakahara and Jun-ichi Kadokawa

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100133

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      Amylose selectively forms inclusion complex with poly(L-lactide) when the phosphorylase-catalyzed polymerization of α-D-glucose 1-phosphate is performed in the presence of poly(L-lactide), poly(D-lactide), or poly(DL-lactide) (“vine-twining polymerization”). This indicates that amylose recognizes the chirality in poly(lactide)s on the formation of an inclusion complex in the vine-twining polymerization.

    10. Enhancement of Cellular Uptake and Antitumor Efficiencies of Micelles with Phosphorylcholine (pages 1416–1425)

      Song Tu, Yuan-Wei Chen, Yong-Bin Qiu, Kun Zhu and Xiang-Lin Luo

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100111

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      Biomemitic micelles containing phosphorylcholine (PC) have been prepared. When loaded with antitumor drug, the micelles show higher cytotoxicity against tumor cells compared to PCL-b-PEG micelles, which can be attributed to their more efficient cellular uptake.

    11. A Collagen Peptide-Based Physical Hydrogel for Cell Encapsulation (pages 1426–1431)

      Charles M. Rubert Pérez, Alyssa Panitch and Jean Chmielewski

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100230

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      A collagen peptide/8-arm star PEG polymer conjugate is described that readily forms hydrogels whose stiffness can be modulated by thermal annealing, and encapsulates mesenchymal stem cells within the well-formed 3D matrix. The collagen peptide triple helix was found to play a significant role in the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels, a feature that can be modified to provide a range of future materials.

    12. Functional and Highly Porous Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications (pages 1432–1442)

      Therese Tyson, Sofia Målberg, Veronica Wåtz, Anna Finne-Wistrand and Ann-Christine Albertsson

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100166

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      Customized and highly porous functional scaffolds with well interconnected pores have been fabricated from multifunctional poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(L-lactide). Cyclic compression characteristics of the porous scaffolds were established under simulated physiological conditions.

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