Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 9

September 09, 2011

Volume 11, Issue 9

Pages 1143–1282

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 9/2011

      Michael J. Poellmann, Kira L. Barton, Sandipan Mishra and Amy J. Wagoner Johnson

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190025

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      Front Cover: Hydrogels and patterned substrates are increasingly used to study the influence of microenvironment on cell function. Here, we use E-Jet to pattern polyacrylamide with proteins as a rapid, flexible approach to creating platforms for studying cell behavior. The image depicts fibronectin ink droplets on a polyacrylamide substrate. Spot sizes as small as 5 μm can be printed and used to constrain single cells. Further details can be found in the article by M. J. Poellmann, K. L. Barton, S. Mishra, and A. J. Wagoner Johnson*on page 1164. Image credit: Jeremy Miller, Ryan Durdle, and Alex Jerez of the ITG Visualization Lab.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 9/2011

      Su Young Chae, Hyun June Kim, Min Sang Lee, Yeon Lim Jang, Yuhan Lee, Soo Hyeon Lee, Kyuri Lee, Sun Hwa Kim, Hong Tae Kim, Sang-Cheol Chi, Tae Gwan Park and Ji Hoon Jeong

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190026

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      Back Cover: Conjugates of a polycation and small molecular amphiphile can achieve efficient gene delivery by polymer-induced macromolecular transduction, which is independent of endocytosis and other energy-consum ption-dependent cellular uptake processes. The exposure of the small molecular amphiphiles on the surface of the polyelectrolyte complexes and the interactions of the exposed amphiphiles with the cell membrane may play an important role in the phenomenon. Further details can be found in the article by S. Y. Chae, H. J. Kim, M. S. Lee, Y. L. Jang, Y. Lee, S. H. Lee, K. Lee, S. H. Kim, H. T. Kim, S.-C. Chi, T. G. Park, and J. H. Jeong*on page 1169.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 9/2011 (pages 1143–1147)

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201190024

  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Covalent Growth Factor Immobilization Strategies for Tissue Repair and Regeneration (pages 1149–1163)

      Kristyn S. Masters

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201000505

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      Covalently immobilized growth factors are capable of stimulating cell behaviors that aid in tissue repair and regeneration, often eliciting a more pronounced cellular response than growth factor delivered in a soluble or adsorbed form. This Feature Article discusses strategies for immobilizing growth factors and applications of growth factor-modified materials in regenerative medicine.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Patterned Hydrogel Substrates for Cell Culture with Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printing (pages 1164–1168)

      Michael J. Poellmann, Kira L. Barton, Sandipan Mishra and Amy J. Wagoner Johnson

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100004

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      Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing is used to print proteins on soft, polyacrylamide substrates with micrometer-scale resolution. Immunofluorescence confirms the presence of patterned cell adhesion proteins, and the patterned hydrogels are shown to support cell attachment and spreading. The method can be used to create cell substrates with well-defined protein geometries and elastic properties.

    2. Energy-Independent Intracellular Gene Delivery Mediated by Polymeric Biomimetics of Cell-Penetrating Peptides (pages 1169–1174)

      Su Young Chae, Hyun June Kim, Min Sang Lee, Yeon Lim Jang, Yuhan Lee, Soo Hyeon Lee, Kyuri Lee, Sun Hwa Kim, Hong Tae Kim, Sang-Cheol Chi, Tae Gwan Park and Ji Hoon Jeong

      Article first published online: 28 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100088

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      Small-molecular amphiphile/polymer conjugates mediate internalization of plasmid DNA to mammalian cells without the aid of endocytosis or other energy-consuming processes, which mimics macromolecular transduction phenomenon by cell penetrating peptides. This novel modality of polymeric biomimetics can be applied to where cell penetrating peptides is required for enhanced delivery of macromolecules.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Poly(D,L-Lactide)-block-Poly(2-Hydroxyethyl Acrylate) Block Copolymers as Potential Biomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Repair: in vitro and in vivo Degradation Studies (pages 1175–1184)

      Benoît Clément, Patrick Decherchi, François Féron, Denis Bertin, Didier Gigmes, Thomas Trimaille and Tanguy Marqueste

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100067

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      The degradation behaviour of novel poly(D,L-lactide)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PLA-b-PHEA) block copolymer materials for nerve repair is investigated. In vitro and in vivo findings are very similar, and the PHEA block length has a strong impact on the degradation mechanism. Schwann cell adhesion on spin coated films of PLA-b-PHEA is assessed, and found to be improved compared to that obtained on PLA ones.

    2. Functionalization of Nanofibrillated Cellulose with Silver Nanoclusters: Fluorescence and Antibacterial Activity (pages 1185–1191)

      Isabel Díez, Paula Eronen, Monika Österberg, Markus B. Linder, Olli Ikkala and Robin H. A. Ras

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100099

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      Native nanocellulose allows the deposition of few-atom fluorescent silver nanoclusters in a supramolecular manner mediated by poly(methacrylic acid). The polymer acts as protecting scaffold for the silver nanoclusters and interacts by hydrogen-bonding to cellulose nanofibers. The adducts show strong luminescence and significant antibacterial activity.

    3. Efficient Intracellular siRNA Delivery by Ethyleneimine-Modified Amphiphilic Macromolecules (pages 1192–1200)

      Sarah M. Sparks, Carolyn L. Waite, Alexander M. Harmon, Leora M. Nusblat, Charles M. Roth and Kathryn E. Uhrich

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100064

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      Cationic amphiphilic macromolecules can facilitate cellular siRNA delivery. Ethyleneimine-modified amphiphilic macromolecules that can encapsulate siRNA are synthesized. These polymers are less cytotoxic than linear polyethyleneimine above 10µM. The incorporation of nine amines into the unimer backbone produces a cationic polymer that can deliver siRNA to elicit gene silencing in malignant glioma cells.

    4. Synthesis of a Difunctional Orthogonal Coupler for the Preparation of Carbohydrate-Functionalized sP(EO-stat-PO) Hydrogels (pages 1201–1210)

      Thorsten Anders, Kathrin Adamiak, Helmut Keul, Lothar Elling and Martin Möller

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100041

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      A difunctional orthogonal coupler based on TMP is synthesized for the connection of a biological active carbohydrate on sP(EO-stat-PO) hydrogel-coated microtiter plates. This immobilization concept is proven by an ELLA of immobilized β-D-GlcNAc with biotinylated lectin II from Griffonia simplicifolia.

    5. Layer-by-Layer Assembled Multilayer Films of Methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(α,L-glutamic acid) and Chitosan with Reduced Cell Adhesion (pages 1211–1217)

      Bin Cao, Shifeng Yan, Kunxi Zhang, Zhijiang Song, Xuesi Chen, Lei Cui and Jingbo Yin

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100053

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      The fabrication of multilayer chitosan/methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid) films is reported. The mechanism of film growth is elucidated. It is demonstrated that cell adhesion is significantly reduced on surfaces coated with such multilayers, making them a promising coating material for many biomedical applications.

    6. Covalent Heparin Modification of a Polysulfone Flat Sheet Membrane for Selective Removal of Low-Density Lipoproteins: A Simple and Versatile Method (pages 1218–1226)

      Jing Li, Xiao-Jun Huang, Jing Ji, Ping Lan, Jörg Vienken, Thomas Groth and Zhi-Kang Xu

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100071

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      A simple and economical method is described for the heparinization of polysulfone membranes, aiming at preparing a low-density lipoprotein absorber for simultaneous LDL apheresis and hemodialysis. CA and TB colorimetric tests demonstrate improved hydrophilicity of the heparinized membranes, while EILSA tests show excellent LDL affinity.

    7. Highly Selective Uptake and Release of Charged Molecules by pH-Responsive Polydopamine Microcapsules (pages 1227–1234)

      Qinze Liu, Bo Yu, Weichun Ye and Feng Zhou

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100061

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      Highly selective and unidirectional uptake/release of charged molecules through Pdop microcapsules can be achieved by controlling pH: at low pH, Pdop incorporates cationic dyes (rhodamine 6G); at high pH, Pdop prefers anionic dyes (methyl orange and alizarin red). The uptake from dye mixtures is highly selective.

    8. Polysulfone/Pyrene Membranes: A New Microwell Assay Platform for Bioapplications (pages 1235–1243)

      Murat Karadag, Gorkem Yilmaz, Hojjat Toiserkani, Dilek Odaci Demirkol, Serhan Sakarya, Lokman Torun, Suna Timur and Yusuf Yagci

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100024

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      The use of pyrene-functional polysulfone membranes as microwell assay platforms for oxidase and hydrolase/oxidase-based enzyme assays as well as cell detection is explored. Microwell plates covered with PSU-Py are applied for GOx and AG activity detection as well as for bioanalysis of glucose and AG inhibitors. A promising tool for cell detection is implemented.

    9. Truly Nonionic Polymer Shells for the Encapsulation of Living Cells (pages 1244–1253)

      Jessica L. Carter, Irina Drachuk, Svetlana Harbaugh, Nancy Kelley-Loughnane, Morley Stone and Vladimir V. Tsukruk

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100129

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      An enhanced strategy for cell encapsulation with LbL shells is reported. By exploiting truly nonionic hydrogen-bonded shells without use of either synthetic or natural polyelectrolyte components, the viability of encapsulated cells increases from 20% in electrostatically-bonded membranes to 94% while long-term growth behavior is not affected.

    10. Size-Controlled Nanoassemblies Based on Cyclodextrin-Modified Dextrans (pages 1254–1263)

      Véronique Wintgens, Thorbjørn Terndrup Nielsen, Kim Lambertsen Larsen and Catherine Amiel

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100097

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      Stable nanoassemblies are formed spontaneously by mixing host- and guest-modified dextrans bearing βCD and Ada groups, respectively. The strong interactions between the two polymers lead to nanoassemblies of tailorable sizes, depending on the βCD and Ada substitution level and on the mixture concentration. Benzophenone can be loaded into the structures without changes of their properties.

    11. Development of Disulfide Core-Crosslinked Pluronic Nanoparticles as an Effective Anticancer-Drug-Delivery System (pages 1264–1271)

      Abdullah-Al-Nahain, Haeshin Lee, Young Sun Lee, Kang Dae Lee and Sung Young Park

      Article first published online: 29 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100083

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      Disulfide core-crosslinked Plu-SH micelles are developed to deliver an encapsulated hydrophobic anticancer drug. At low DTT concentrations, the micelles are too stable to release the drug, but at higher DTT concentrations, the drug molecules are released from the micelles due to cleavage of the disulfide bond.

    12. In vitro Characterization of an Electroactive Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanofiber Scaffold for Tissue Engineering (pages 1272–1282)

      Joseph N. Mackle, David J.-P. Blond, Emma Mooney, Caitlin McDonnell, Werner J. Blau, Georgina Shaw, Frank P. Barry, J. Mary Murphy and Valerie Barron

      Article first published online: 4 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100029

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      An electroactive carbon nanotube/poly(lactic acid) scaffold is created and characterized. The degradation profile after immersion in simulated physiological solutions at 37°C over a 28-day period is described, where the CNT appear to stabilize the mechanical properties and physical integrity of the scaffold. Furthermore, hMSC grown in the presence of this electroactive scaffold show no adverse cytotoxic response.

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