Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 10

October 2012

Volume 12, Issue 10

Pages 1295–1442

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2012

      Shahed Al-Haque, Jason W. Miklas, Nicole Feric, Loraine L. Y. Chiu, Wen Li Kelly Chen, Craig A. Simmons and Milica Radisic

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The ability of cardiac fibroblasts to sense the topography of their microenvironment varies with substrate stiffness. Stiffness and topography have an interactive effect on cell morphology and alignment. This paper demonstrates that 18 kPa topographically modified substrates optimally induce elongation and alignment of cardiac fibroblasts. Further details can be found in the article by S. Al-Haque, J. W. Miklas, N. Feric, L. L. Y. Chiu, W. L. K. Chen, C. A. Simmons, and M. Radisic* on page 1342.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2012

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290037

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 10/2012 (pages 1295–1300)

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290035

  4. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Micro-Engineered 3D Scaffolds for Cell Culture Studies (pages 1301–1314)

      Alexandra M. Greiner, Benjamin Richter and Martin Bastmeyer

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200132

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two-photon polymerization techniques and other methods are used to fabricate physically and/or biochemically well-defined synthetic 3D cell culture scaffolds. Single cell responses to geometrical, biochemical, and mechanical aspects of these tailored 3D environments are discussed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Polylactide Block Copolymers using Trimethylene Carbonate with Methoxyethoxy Side Groups for Dual Modification of Hydrophilicity and Biodegradability (pages 1315–1320)

      Hiroharu Ajiro, Yoshikazu Takahashi, Mitsuru Akashi and Tomoko Fujiwara

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Block copolymers of polylactide (PLA) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with hydrophilic methoxyethoxyl groups are designed. The surface of the copolymer films are covered by PTMC segments due to the hydrophilicity of the methoxyethoxy groups, observed by XPS spectra. The results lead to the suppression of PLA degradation by proteinase K, as well as PTMC degradation by lipase due to the methoxyethoxy groups.

    2. Design of a Cellular-Uptake-Shielding Magnetic Catcher for Cancer Cell Separation (pages 1321–1325)

      Ya Wang, Jing Zhang, Hui-Zhen Jia, Juan Yang, Si-Yong Qin, Chen-Wei Liu, Ren-Xi Zhuo and Xian-Zheng Zhang

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A cellular-uptake-shielding magnetic cell catcher is fabricated in the form of multifunctional microcapsules via LbL self-assembly. The microcapsules are capable of identifying specific target cancer cells due to the RGD recognition motifs, and of isolating the cancer cells efficiently with the aid of a magnetic field.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. In vitro and in vivo Antitumor Activity of Doxorubicin-Loaded Alginic-Acid-Based Nanoparticles (pages 1326–1335)

      Yuan Cheng, Shuling Yu, Jingjing Wang, Hanqing Qian, Wei Wu and Xiqun Jiang

      Article first published online: 7 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The antitumor activity of DOX-loaded ALG-PDEA NPs is evaluated both in vitro and in vivo through cell culture and animal models. It is found that the DOX-loaded ALG-PDEA NPs effectively suppress tumor growth compared with free DOX while at the same time reducing the side effects of DOX.

    2. Fabrication of Nanofiber Scaffolds With Gradations in Fiber Organization and Their Potential Applications (pages 1336–1341)

      Jingwei Xie, Bing Ma, Praveesuda Lorwattanapongsa Michael and Franklin D. Shuler

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The nanofiber organization, achieved by deposition of random fibers on the uniaxially-aligned nanofiber mat in a gradient manner, directed morphological changes of applied adipose-derived stem cells, which could help mimic the structural orientation of complex biomechanical structures like the collagen fiber structure at the tendon-to-bone insertion site.

    3. Hydrogel Substrate Stiffness and Topography Interact to Induce Contact Guidance in Cardiac Fibroblasts (pages 1342–1353)

      Shahed Al-Haque, Jason W. Miklas, Nicole Feric, Loraine L. Y. Chiu, Wen Li Kelly Chen, Craig A. Simmons and Milica Radisic

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Most studies focusing on contact guidance use rigid patterned substrates. It is not known how the cell's ability to follow grooves and ridges changes as the substrate stiffness is decreased to the range found in native tissues. A significant interactive effect of substrate stiffness and topography on cardiac fibroblast elongation and orientation is demonstrated.

    4. Non-Adhesive Behavior of New Nanostructured PNIPAM Surfaces Towards Specific Neurodegenerative Proteins: Application to Storage and Titration of Tau Proteins (pages 1354–1363)

      Tjasa Vrlinic, Dominique Debarnot, Gilbert Legeay, Arnaud Coudreuse, Benaissa El Moualij, Willy Zorzi, Armand Perret-Liaudet, Isabelle Quadrio, Miran Mozetic and Fabienne Poncin-Epaillard

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Storage tubes for biological material induce a side adsorption of neurodegenerative markers leading to their depletion. New inner surfaces of storage tubes are developed using a combination of plasma chemistry and grafting of a polymer-surfactant mixture. Their nonfouling properties are shown to depend on their surface charge and the surface texturing.

    5. Permanent Polymer Coating for in vivo MRI Visualization of Tissue Reinforcement Prostheses (pages 1364–1374)

      Olivier Guillaume, Sébastien Blanquer, Vincent Letouzey, Arnaud Cornille, Stephanie Huberlant, Laurent Lemaire, Florence Franconi, Renaud de Tayrac, Jean Coudane and Xavier Garric

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200208

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis and characterization of a new MRI-visible polymer is described. MR signal enhancement and gadolinium stability of coated meshes with DTPA-Gd-PMA are satisfying, even after sterilization. In vitro, the polymer does not induce a cytotoxic effect on fibroblasts. Moreover, the T1 effect of the polymer allows an efficient and fast localization of coated meshes after implantation.

    6. Tunable pH-Sensitive Poly(β-amino ester)s Synthesized from Primary Amines and Diacrylates for Intracellular Drug Delivery (pages 1375–1383)

      Wantong Song, Zhaohui Tang, Mingqiang Li, Shixian Lv, Haiyang Yu, Lili Ma, Xiuli Zhuang, Yubin Huang and Xuesi Chen

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The pH sensitivity of a series of PbAEs based on primary amines is studied. A PEG-PolyA3 block copolymer is synthesized from mPEG-acrylate, 1-propylamine and 1,4-butanediol diacrylate. It has a rapid transition at around pH = 6.4. In vitro release and cell experiment studies show that it provides a potential pH-responsive nanocarrier for intracellular drug delivery.

    7. Polyfluorene Nanoparticles Coated with Folate-Functionalized Triblock Copolymer: Effective Agents for Targeted Cell Imaging (pages 1384–1390)

      Li Liu, Abhijit Patra, Ullrich Scherf and Thomas Kissel

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An ultra-bright fluorescence probe comprising folate-conjugated polymer nanoparticles is developed for targeted cell imaging of FR over-expressing cancer cells. Highly blue fluorescent polyfluorene nanoparticles with negative surface charges are coated with a folate-conjugated cationic triblock copolymer. The coated PF-NPs exhibit efficient cell imaging for FR over-expressing KB cells.

    8. Enhancing Specific Binding of L929 Fibroblasts: Effects of Multi-Scale Topography of GRGDY Peptide Modified Surfaces (pages 1391–1400)

      Feng Zhou, Dan Li, Zhaoqiang Wu, Bo Song, Lin Yuan and Hong Chen

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200129

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Micro/nano-structures of different roughness formed by depositing gold NPs on planar gold films adsorb large amounts of proteins non-specifically, but inhibit L929 cell growth; however, after modification with POEGMA brushes via ATRP and further conjugation with GRGDY, the surface enhances L929 fibroblast-specific interactions while maintaining superior low-fouling properties.

    9. Thermo-Switchable Antibacterial Activity (pages 1401–1412)

      Claudia Mattheis, Yi Zhang and Seema Agarwal

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200207

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Copolymers of NIPAAm and AEMA with low toxicity exhibit a thermo-switchable antibacterial effect which is more prominent toward Gram-negative than to Gram-positive bacteria. The effect is studied for copolymers in solution and a crosslinked non-leaching coating on cotton by different microbiological test methods regarding E. coli and B. subtilis.

    10. Surfaces Resistant to Fouling from Biological Fluids: Towards Bioactive Surfaces for Real Applications (pages 1413–1422)

      Cesar Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Milan Houska, Aldo Bologna Alles and Eduard Brynda

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200171

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antifouling surfaces based on ω-oligo(ethylene glycol)alkanethiols and on polymer brushes of HOEGMA, HEMA, CBAA and HPMA are challenged with eight biofluids of interest for human and veterinary diagnostics and bioapplications. Among the excellent antifouling properties observed on brushes, poly(CBAA) and poly(HPMA) emerge as the only non-fouling surfaces.

    11. Resilient Amorphous Networks Prepared by Photo-Crosslinking High-Molecular-Weight D,L-Lactide and Trimethylene Carbonate Macromers: Mechanical Properties and Shape-Memory Behavior (pages 1423–1435)

      Shahriar Sharifi and Dirk W. Grijpma

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tough biodegradable shape-memory networks with good shape fixity and shape recoverability are prepared from high-molecular-weight D,L-lactide and trimethylene carbonate macromers. The glass transition temperature (Tg) defines the shape transition temperature. When Tg is close to body temperature, flexible devices that can be implanted minimal-invasively can be designed.

    12. Encapsulation of Photosensitizer into Multilayer Microcapsules by Combination of Spontaneous Deposition and Heat-Induced Shrinkage for Photodynamic Therapy (pages 1436–1442)

      Yuanyuan Han, Jing Bu, Yuying Zhang, Weijun Tong and Changyou Gao

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Loading of the low-molecular-weight water-soluble photosensitizer MB is achieved by heat-shrinkage of polyelectrolyte multilayer capsules. Most of the encapsulated MB molecules are stably retained for long time and protected by the capsule walls against reductive enzymes, and keep their photodynamic activity to effectively kill cancer cells under laser irradiation.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION