Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 11

November 2012

Volume 12, Issue 11

Pages 1447–1590

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 11/2012

      Kwang-Sook Park, Kyoung Je Cha, In-Bo Han, Dong-Ah Shin, Dong-Woo Cho, Soo-Hong Lee and Dong Sung Kim

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: Two different kinds of nano-featured polystyrene surfaces containing nanopore or nanopillar arrays have been replicated by hot embossing with nickel nano-stamps in order to investigate the effect of nano-featured surfaces on the behaviors of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). Compared to the flat surface, the ASCs on the nano-featured surfaces exhibited different behaviors, such as cell morphology, integrin expression, and differentiation. Further details can be found in the article by K.-S. Park, K. J. Cha, I.-B. Han, D.-A. Shin, D.-W. Cho, S.-H. Lee, and D. S. Kim* on page 1480.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 11/2012

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290040

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 11/2012 (pages 1447–1451)

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290038

  4. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Development of Protein-Cage-Based Delivery Nanoplatforms by Polyvalently Displaying β-Cyclodextrins on the Surface of Ferritins Through Copper(I)-Catalyzed Azide/Alkyne Cycloaddition (pages 1452–1458)

      Chanho Kwon, Young Ji Kang, Sangbin Jeon, Seunho Jung, Sung You Hong and Sebyung Kang

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200178

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      24 β-cyclodextrins are displayed on the surface of a human ferritin in distinct positions through thiol-mediated conjugation followed by copper(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition. These β-cyclodextrins displayed on the surface show an excellent capability to form inclusion complexes with FITC-ADs via molecular recognition and to release them reversibly.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Surface Roughness and Charge Influence the Uptake of Nanoparticles: Fluorescently Labeled Pickering-Type Versus Surfactant-Stabilized Nanoparticles (pages 1459–1471)

      Anika Schrade, Volker Mailänder, Sandra Ritz, Katharina Landfester and Ulrich Ziener

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200166

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      The influence of the surface roughness and charge of nanoparticles on the cellular uptake rate and route is studied. Rough (Pickering-type) and smooth (surfactant-stabilized), oppositely charged nanoparticles with a size of around 200 nm offer distinct differences in the interaction and cellular uptake behavior.

    2. Near IR Fluorescent Polystyrene/Albumin Core/Shell Nanoparticles for Specific Targeting of Colonic Neoplasms (pages 1472–1479)

      Michal Pellach, Igor Grinberg and Shlomo Margel

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200142

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      Near IR fluorescent core/shell polystyrene/HSA nanoparticles are prepared and characterised for in vivo diagnostics. The potential of the nanoparticles for use in early diagnosis of colon cancer is demonstrated with specific tumour labelling of LS174T, SW480 and HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, using in ovo (chicken embryo) and in vivo (mouse) models.

    3. Mass-producible Nano-featured Polystyrene Surfaces for Regulating the Differentiation of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells (pages 1480–1489)

      Kwang-Sook Park, Kyoung Je Cha, In-Bo Han, Dong-Ah Shin, Dong-Woo Cho, Soo-Hong Lee and Dong Sung Kim

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Artificial nano-featured substrates can be applied for controlling cell behavior. Polystyrene nano-featured substrates with nanopore (NPo) and nanopillar (NPi) arrays are replicated by a polymer molding technique and the behaviors of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are investigated on them. By comparison with a flat substrate, the effect of NPo- and NPi-featured substrates on the attachment, morphology, integrin expression and differentiation of ASCs is shown.

    4. Robust and Semi-Interpenetrating Hydrogels from Poly(ethylene glycol) and Collagen for Elastomeric Tissue Scaffolds (pages 1490–1501)

      Burke K. Chan, Caitlin C. Wippich, Chia-Jung Wu, Preeti M. Sivasankar and Gudrun Schmidt

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200234

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      Covalent crosslinking of PEG in the presence of collagen leads to robust and semi-interpenetrating hydrogels. The addition of collagen enhances viscoelasticity, elongation as well as cell adhesion and proliferation. Results suggest the potential of these hydrogels for elastomeric tissue scaffolds applications.

    5. Preparation of Biomimetic Hydrogels with Controlled Cell Adhesive Properties and Topographical Features for the Study of Muscle Cell Adhesion and Proliferation (pages 1502–1513)

      Indong Jun, Seok Joo Kim, Eunpyo Choi, Kyung Min Park, Taiyoun Rhim, Jungyul Park, Ki Dong Park and Heungsoo Shin

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200148

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      Presented here is a method to produce biomimetic hydrogels with controlled cell adhesive properties and topographical features. Our findings suggest that hydrogels prepared by this method with specifically engineered cues may be of value in studies of regulatory mechanisms in cell-ECM communication.

    6. Methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-Poly(L-glutamic acid)-Loaded Cisplatin and a Combination With iRGD for the Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancers (pages 1514–1523)

      Wantong Song, Mingqiang Li, Zhaohui Tang, Quanshun Li, Yan Yang, Huaiyu Liu, Taicheng Duan, Hua Hong and Xuesi Chen

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200145

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      Cisplatin (CDDP) is loaded into mPEG-b-PLG and a combination with cyclic iRGD (CRGDKGPDC) is applied for non-small-cell lung cancer therapy. In vivo results show that the toxicity of CDDP is significantly reduced by incorporating into PLG, and the anti-tumor effect is clearly increased when iRGD is coadministrated.

    7. Preparation of Pixantrone/Poly(γ-glutamic acid) Nanoparticles through Complex Self-Assembly for Oral Chemotherapy (pages 1524–1533)

      Lili Meng, Bing Ji, Wei Huang, Dali Wang, Gangsheng Tong, Yue Su, Xinyuan Zhu and Deyue Yan

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200137

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      PIX/γ-PGA NPs are prepared by mixing anionic γ-PGA and the anticancer drug PDM in water. They exhibit pH-dependent release behavior under the simulated environment of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro studies show that PIX/γ-PGA NPs can be effectively internalized by Lovo cancer cells and display potent anticancer efficacy. The IC50 of PIX/γ-PGA NPs is 0.40 µg mL−1.

    8. Cellular Uptake of Covalent Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) Microcapsules and Its Influences on Cell Functions (pages 1534–1545)

      Bing Wang, Yuying Zhang, Zhengwei Mao and Changyou Gao

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200182

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      The mechanism of the cellular uptake of polyelectrolyte microcapsules and its influences on the functions of SMCs are reported. The capsules are easily ingested by SMCs mainly through macropinosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis pathways. The uptake of microcapsules causes profound alternation of cell functions such as cytoskeleton organization, cell cycle, cell adhesion, and migration ability.

    9. Human Elastin-Based Recombinant Biopolymers Improve Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation (pages 1546–1554)

      Betül Çelebi, Maxime Cloutier, Rodrigo Balloni, Diego Mantovani and Antonella Bandiera

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200170

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      Artificial proteins mimicking elastin are produced by the expression of synthetic genes. Two prototypic elastin-based biopolymers are assayed to validate their potential for tissue-engineering applications with MSCs. Biomimetic surfaces are prepared, characterized and then evaluated for cytocompatibility. The effect of these substrates toward osteogenic differentiation of cells is explored.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Human Elastin-Based Recombinant Biopolymers Improve Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

      Vol. 13, Issue 4, 523, Article first published online: 18 APR 2013

    10. Bioinspired Bioadhesive Polymers: Dopa-Modified Poly(acrylic acid) Derivatives (pages 1555–1565)

      Bryan Laulicht, Alexis Mancini, Nathanael Geman, Daniel Cho, Kenneth Estrellas, Stacia Furtado, Russell Hopson, Anubhav Tripathi and Edith Mathiowitz

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200179

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      Photograph of a bioinspired-polymer-coated spherical probe being retracted from rat small-intestinal mucus. The necking of the mucus in response to the movement of the probe shows the strong bioadhesive nature of the bioinspired polymer. Dopa-functional, mussel-mimetic bioadhesive polymers for use in oral drug delivery are described.

    11. Collagen-Reinforced Electrospun Silk Fibroin Tubular Construct as Small Calibre Vascular Graft (pages 1566–1574)

      Benedetto Marelli, Matteo Achilli, Antonio Alessandrino, Giuliano Freddi, Maria Cristina Tanzi, Silvia Farè and Diego Mantovani

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200195

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      An electrospun silk fibroin tubular construct is hybridized with type I collagen gel to produce a scaffold with potential applications as small calibre blood vessel graft. The proposed nanofibrillar tube possesses mechanical properties (i.e., compliance) comparable to the one of saphenous veins and favors the early response of the material to cell culturing.

    12. Comb-Shaped Glycopolymer/Peptide Bioconjugates by Combination of RAFT Polymerization and Thiol-Ene “Click” Chemistry (pages 1575–1582)

      Xiaobei Wang, Li Liu, Yan Luo, Haiting Shi, Jingyi Li and Hanying Zhao

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200274

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      Tripeptide reduced glutathione (GSH) is conjugated to acrylate-functional block glycocopolymers through an acid-labile β-thiopropionate linkage. The glycopolymer/GSH bioconjugate self-assembles to sugar-installed spherical micelles with pH-sensitive, degradation, and biological recognition characteristics.

    13. Fluorescent Polymeric Micelles with Tetraphenylethylene Moieties and Their Application for the Selective Detection of Glucose (pages 1583–1590)

      Xiang Shen, Yi Shi, Bo Peng, Kan Li, Junfeng Xiang, Guanxin Zhang, Zitong Liu, Yongming Chen and Deqing Zhang

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescent polymeric micelles containing tetraphenylethylene (TPE) moieties are prepared by taking advantage of the aggregation-induced emission feature of TPE. These fluorescent polymeric micelles are successfully employed for the detection of D-glucose in the presence of GOx and KI by utilizing the cascaded enzymatic and chemical oxidations.

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