Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 12

December 2012

Volume 12, Issue 12

Pages 1595–1738

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 12/2012

      Mariana C. Burrows, Vitor M. Zamarion, Fabíola B. Filippin-Monteiro, Desirèe C. Schuck, Henrique E. Toma, Ana Campa, Célia R. S. Garcia and Luiz H. Catalani

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290042

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      Front Cover: A hybrid material with excellent mechanical and biological properties was produced by electrospinning a cosolution of PET and collagen. Fibers of different compositions and morphologies were intermingled, resulting in better cell attachment and proliferation. These materials are potential candidates to be used as vascular grafts. Further details can be found in the article by M. C. Burrows, V. M. Zamarion, F. B. Filippin-Monteiro, D. C. Schuck, H. E. Toma, A. Campa, C. R. S. Garcia, and L. H. Catalani* on page 1660.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 12/2012

      Licheng Tan, Samarendra Maji, Claudia Mattheis, Yiwang Chen and Seema Agarwal

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290043

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      Back Cover: Novel degradable and antibacterial polymers are made by clicking hydantoin moieties to polycaprolactone. The degradability of polycaprolactone was retained and a fast antibacterial action towards Gram-negative and -positive cells was introduced thereby. Further details can be found in the article by L. Tan, S. Maji, C. Mattheis, Y. Chen, and S. Agarwal* on page 1721.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 12/2012

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290044

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 12/2012 (pages 1595–1599)

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290041

  5. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Multifunctional Non-Viral Delivery Systems Based on Conjugated Polymers (pages 1600–1614)

      Gaomai Yang, Fengting Lv, Bing Wang, Libing Liu, Qiong Yang and Shu Wang

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200267

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      CPs are considered as novel candidates to serve as multifunctional delivery systems due to their high fluorescence quantum yield, good photostability, and low cytotoxicity. This feature article mainly focuses on CP-based multifunctional non-viral delivery systems for drug, protein, gene, and cell delivery.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Tracking Injectable Microspheres in Dynamic Tissues With Encapsulated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 1615–1621)

      Travelle Franklin-Ford, Nehal Shah, Ellen Leiferman, Connie S. Chamberlain, Amish Raval, Ray Vanderby and William L. Murphy

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100489

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      The use of SPIO nanoparticles encapsulated into PLG microspheres as a tracking vehicle for injectable microsphere delivery in static and dynamic tissues is discussed. The retention of tracer microspheres in vivo, 28 d post injection, is demonstrated. This suggests the potential benefit of including SPIO encapsulated microspheres in future drug delivery applications to track therapy.

    2. Development of Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery System Using Phenylboronic Acid Functionalized Poly(D,L-lactide)-b-Dextran Nanoparticles (pages 1622–1626)

      Shengyan Liu, Lyndon Jones and Frank X. Gu

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200216

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      Nanoscale ocular drug carriers are developed from phenylboronic acid modified poly(D,L-lactide)-b-dextran nanoparticles. These particles of approximately 28 nm in diameter are able to encapsulate clinically relevant dosage of drugs and release them at a sustained rate. The drug carriers, by targeting the ocular mucosa, may reduce the clearance of drugs from tear turnover, and thus improve the ocular bioavailability of topically administered drugs.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Feature Article
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. In vitro 3D Full-Thickness Skin-Equivalent Tissue Model Using Silk and Collagen Biomaterials (pages 1627–1636)

      Evangelia Bellas, Miri Seiberg, Jonathan Garlick and David L. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200262

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      Natural biomaterials and human cells are used to develop a tri-layer human skin equivalent. The hypodermis is formed in a silk sponge and the epidermal/dermal layer with a collagen gel. They are cultured together forming a physiologically relevant skin equivalent ultimately as a replacement for animal testing, studying skin biology or as a skin graft.

    2. Functionalized Polystyrene Nanoparticles Trigger Human Dendritic Cell Maturation Resulting in Enhanced CD4+ T Cell Activation (pages 1637–1647)

      Stefanie U. Frick, Nicole Bacher, Grit Baier, Volker Mailänder, Katharina Landfester and Kerstin Steinbrink

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200223

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      Sulfonate- and phosphonate-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a pronounced uptake by immature and mature dendritic cells compared to unfunctionalized nanoparticles. Moreover, sulfonated and phosphonated polystyrene nanoparticles trigger iDC maturation accompanied with a strengthened CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity and elevated IFN-γ levels, indicating a Th1 response.

    3. Impact of Peptide Micropatterning on Endothelial Cell Actin Remodeling for Cell Alignment under Shear Stress (pages 1648–1659)

      Céline Chollet, Reine Bareille, Murielle Rémy, Alain Guignandon, Laurence Bordenave, Gaetan Laroche and Marie-Christine Durrieu

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200167

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      Polyethylene terephthalate surfaces micropatterned with both RGDS and WQPPRARI peptides are studied in order to control endothelial cell adhesion under shear stress. These materials allow creating geometries on surface to guide cell orientation under shear stress and controlling surface chemical composition to modulate cell behavior.

    4. Hybrid Scaffolds Built From PET and Collagen as a Model For Vascular Graft Architecture (pages 1660–1670)

      Mariana C. Burrows, Vitor M. Zamarion, Fabíola B. Filippin-Monteiro, Desirèe C. Schuck, Henrique E. Toma, Ana Campa, Célia R. S. Garcia and Luiz H. Catalani

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200154

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      Electrospinning of a PET/collagen co-solution produces a mat of heterogeneous nature in which fibers of mostly pure collagen are intermingled with fibers of pure PET. The PET/collagen ratio defines several characteristics of these mats, including morphology and composition of the fibers. In vitro cell culture indicates a potential use of this material as vascular grafts.

    5. Patterned Silk Film Scaffolds for Aligned Lamellar Bone Tissue Engineering (pages 1671–1679)

      Lee W. Tien, Eun Seok Gil, Sang-Hyug Park, Biman B. Mandal and David L. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200193

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      Silk films with grooved surface topographies are evaluated for their effect on the organization and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The patterned silk films support osteogenic differentiation while also inducing robust alignment of the cells and extracellular matrix. Multilayered structures form spontaneously and resemble the cellular architecture of native cortical bone lamellae.

    6. N-Isopropylacrylamide-Modified Polyethylenimines as Effective Gene Carriers (pages 1680–1688)

      Huayu Tian, Feifan Li, Jie Chen, Yubin Huang and Xuesi Chen

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200249

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      Polyethylenimines are simply modified by N-isopropylacrylamide via Michael addition. The optimized transfection efficiency of the obtained derivatives is 18-fold higher than that of pristine PEI-25K. Furthermore, the modified PEI has not only great endocytosis ability but also amazing nuclear uptake ability.

    7. One-Step Preparation and pH-Tunable Self-Aggregation of Amphoteric Aliphatic Polycarbonates Bearing Plenty of Amine and Carboxyl Groups (pages 1689–1696)

      Hua-Fen Wang, Hui-Zhen Jia, Jing-Yi Zhu, Yan-Feng Chu, Jun Feng, Xian-Zheng Zhang and Ren-Xi Zhuo

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200295

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      An amphoteric aliphatic polycarbonate functionalized with amine and carboxyl groups is designed and prepared by one-step enzymatic biosynthesis. The simultaneous incorporation of amine and carboxyl functionalities provides the copolymer with a pH-tunable self-aggregation feature, leading to multiple aggregation states including precipitated agglomerate, well-dispersed positively or negatively charged nanoparticles in a controlled manner.

    8. Enhancement of Fatty Acid-based Polyurethanes Cytocompatibility by Non-covalent Anchoring of Chondroitin Sulfate (pages 1697–1705)

      Rodolfo J. González-Paz, Gerard Lligadas, Juan C. Ronda, Marina Galià, Ana M. Ferreira, Francesca Boccafoschi, Gianluca Ciardelli and Virginia Cádiz

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200259

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      Linear polyurethanes prepared from naturally occurring fatty acid-derived diols are surface modified via aminolysis treatment as a previous step to ionically immobilize bioactive chondroitin sulfate (CS). CS immobilization significantly increases surface wettability, as well as enhances osteoblast cytocompatibility in comparison with base polyurethanes.

    9. Effect of Polymer Degree of Conversion on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms (pages 1706–1713)

      Alison M. Kraigsley, Kathy Tang, Katrice A. Lippa, John A. Howarter, Sheng Lin-Gibson and Nancy J. Lin

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200214

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      Microbial growth can lead to failure of dimethacrylate-based polymers. This study demonstrates for the first time that dimethacrylate polymer degree of conversion (DC), which can vary significantly for materials polymerized in situ, alters bacterial biofilms. The predominant property responsible for this effect is leachable release and not tethered surface methacrylates.

    10. Polymer Carriers for Anticancer Drugs Targeted to EGF Receptor (pages 1714–1720)

      Martin Studenovsky, Robert Pola, Michal Pechar, Tomas Etrych, Karel Ulbrich, Lubomir Kovar, Martina Kabesova and Blanka Rihova

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200270

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      Treatment of cancer still suffers from moderate efficiency and serious side-effects. Most currently used chemotherapeutics exhibit non-specific toxicity, moreover, only a small fraction of the administered dose reaches the tumor. This study proposes a universal drug carrier targeted to cancer cells, enabling preferential action of the drug inside the tumor and suppression of its toxicity.

    11. Antimicrobial Hydantoin-grafted Poly(ε-caprolactone) by Ring-opening Polymerization and Click Chemistry (pages 1721–1730)

      Licheng Tan, Samarendra Maji, Claudia Mattheis, Yiwang Chen and Seema Agarwal

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200238

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      Poly(ε-caprolactone) is equipped with antibacterial properties via introduction of pendant hydantoin moieties by means of click-chemistry which furthermore enhances the mechanical and thermal stability compared to linear PCL. The degradability of the material is retained and a fast antibacterial action toward Gram-negative and positive cells is introduced thereby.

    12. Glycogen as a Biodegradable Construction Nanomaterial for in vivo Use (pages 1731–1738)

      Sergey K. Filippov, Ondrej Sedlacek, Anna Bogomolova, Miroslav Vetrik, Daniel Jirak, Jan Kovar, Jan Kucka, Sara Bals, Stuart Turner, Petr Stepanek and Martin Hruby

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200294

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      It is demonstrated that chemically modified glycogen as a biodegradable and inexpensive material coming from renewable resources (and which is present normally in the human body in amounts of ≈100 g depending on nutritional status) could be useful as a polymer nanocarrier for in vivo imaging.

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