Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 3

March 2012

Volume 12, Issue 3

Pages 279–422

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 3/2012

      Kenichi Nagase, Naoto Mukae, Akihiko Kikuchi and Teruo Okano

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The cover image shows thermo-responsive polymer brushes with various chain lengths prepared by ATRP and retention of lymphocyte on them. The interaction between PIPAAm-brush and lymphocyte was controlled by modulating the PIPAAm brush length and changing the temperature. Thus, PIPAAm brush grafted glass beads can be used as effective cell separation matrices. Further details can be found in the article by K. Nagase, N. Mukae, A. Kikuchi, and T. Okano* on page 333.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 3/2012

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290010

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 3/2012 (pages 279–283)

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290007

  4. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 3/2012

      Benjamin F. Pierce, Erik Pittermann, Nan Ma, Tim Gebauer, Axel T. Neffe, Magdalena Hölscher, Friedrich Jung and Andreas Lendlein

      Version of Record online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  5. Special Article Series - Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Advances in Polymeric Systems for Tissue Engineering and Biomedical Applications (pages 286–311)

      Rajeswari Ravichandran, Subramanian Sundarrajan, Jayarama Reddy Venugopal, Shayanti Mukherjee and Seeram Ramakrishna

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Smart stimuli-responsive polymeric systems with smart surfaces are used for engineering a biological construct embedded with cells and biomolecules/drugs. Upon response to suitable stimuli like pH in vivo, the polymer unwinds and becomes hydrophobic thereby delivering cells and biomolecules to the target organ in the human body.

  6. Special Article Series - Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. Viability of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on Crosslinked Entropy-Elastic Gelatin-Based Hydrogels (pages 312–321)

      Benjamin F. Pierce, Erik Pittermann, Nan Ma, Tim Gebauer, Axel T. Neffe, Magdalena Hölscher, Friedrich Jung and Andreas Lendlein

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100237

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) show a high viability on gelatin-based networks with tailorable properties. Gelatin crosslinked with lysine diisocyanate ethyl ester in water yielded degradable, sterilizable, and non-toxic hydrogels. The hydrogels have potential as implantable carriers for stem cells, which are needed in regenerative therapies.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Viability of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on Crosslinked Entropy-Elastic Gelatin-Based Hydrogels

      Vol. 15, Issue 3, 437, Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2015

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Frontispiece
    6. Special Article Series - Review
    7. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
    1. The Influence of Silkworm Species on Cellular Interactions with Novel PVA/Silk Sericin Hydrogels (pages 322–332)

      Khoon S. Lim, Joydip Kundu, April Reeves, Laura A. Poole-Warren, Subhas C. Kundu and Penny J. Martens

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100292

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel biosynthetic hydrogels composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) and silk sericin peptides are fabricated and characterized. The resulting co-hydrogels are bioactive matrices that have the ability to support cell growth and proliferation, and can be potentially used in soft-tissue engineering applications.

    2. Thermally Modulated Retention of Lymphoctytes on Polymer-Brush-Grafted Glass Beads (pages 333–340)

      Kenichi Nagase, Naoto Mukae, Akihiko Kikuchi and Teruo Okano

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thermoresponsive polymer brushes with various chain lengths are prepared on glass bead surfaces through siATRP. The interaction between PIPAAm brush and lymphocytes is controlled by modulating PIPAAm brush length and changing temperature. The prepared PIPAAm brush grafted glass beads may have applications as effective cell separation matrices.

    3. Closing One of the Last Gaps in Polyionene Compositions: Alkyloxyethylammonium Ionenes as Fast-Acting Biocides (pages 341–349)

      Claudia Mattheis, Mengyao Zheng and Seema Agarwal

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100316

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antibacterial alkyl-oxyethyl polyionenes with different alkyl substituents at the quaternary nitrogen as well as different counter ions are synthesized and characterized. The influence of the molecular composition on the MIC and time-dependence of antibacterial action are studied for E. coli, and biocompatibility is investigated by the cytotoxicity towards L929 mouse fibroblast cells.

    4. Encapsulation and Survival of a Chondrocyte Cell Line within Xanthan Gum Derivative (pages 350–359)

      Ana C. Mendes, Erkan T. Baran, Rui C. Pereira, Helena S. Azevedo and Rui L. Reis

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100304

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Through the use of a novel micro-droplet generator and a negatively charged polysaccharide (carboxymethyl xanthan gum), spherical capsules with homogeneous size distribution and micrometer size can be generated by ionic crosslinking. These microcapsules support cell viability and proliferation, suggesting applications as new artificial matrix for the microencapsulation of living cells.

    5. Controlled Cell Proliferation on an Electrochemically Engineered Collagen Scaffold (pages 360–366)

      Robert Gendron, M. Ramesh Kumar, Helene Paradis, Darryl Martin, Nhu Ho, Danielle Gardiner, Erika F. Merschrod S. and Kristin M. Poduska

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100341

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A transparent, electrochemically produced collagen matrix shows promise as a scaffold for cornea repair. Immortalized corneal fibroblasts seeded onto this matrix are viable but do not proliferate, similar to their behavior in a native corneal environment. This unusual matrix property – the ability to contain cell growth – could also be relevant for controlling cell growth in engineered tissues.

    6. Delivery of Active DACH-Pt Anticancer Species by Biodegradable Amphiphilic Polymers Using Thiol-Ene Radical Addition (pages 367–373)

      Haihua Xiao, Dongfang Zhou, Shi Liu, Ruogu Qi, Yonghui Zheng, Yubin Huang and Xiabin Jing

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100320

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A biodegradable and amphiphilic copolymer with pendant 1,2-bidendate carboxyl groups is effectively synthesized by thiol-ene reaction. It is then chelated with active anticancer species of oxaliplatin to form polymer/platinum(II) conjugate micelles, which display comparable or better cytotoxicity than oxaliplatin.

    7. Polyelectrolyte Complex Materials Consisting of Antibacterial and Cell-Supporting Layers (pages 374–382)

      Khairul Anuar Mat Amin, Kerry J. Gilmore, Jake Matic, Stephen Poon, Mark J. Walker, Mark R. Wilson and Marc in het Panhuis

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows a free-standing dual-layer film prepared by polyelectrolyte complexation of gellan gum with chitosan. The upper layer consists of chitosan with incorporated levofloxacin which displays anti-bacterial activity, while the under layer is a gellan gum/TiO2 composite which supports the growth of cells.

    8. Redox-Responsive Degradable PEG Cryogels as Potential Cell Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering (pages 383–394)

      Tugba Dispinar, Wim Van Camp, Liesbeth J. De Cock, Bruno G. De Geest and Filip E. Du Prez

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100396

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A Michael addition reaction between a maleimide double bond and an amine group is used for the synthesis of redox-responsive PEG cryogels. The cryogels exhibit an interconnected macroporous morphology, good mechanical properties and redox-responsive degradation without any negative effect on cell viability. Analysis shows that the cryogels provide a suitable environment for cell growth.

    9. Biomimicking Polysaccharide Nanofibers Promote Vascular Phenotypes: A Potential Application for Vascular Tissue Engineering (pages 395–401)

      Liya Shi, Rachida Aid, Catherine Le Visage and Sing Yian Chew

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100336

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The efficacy of pullulan/dextran nanofibers for vascular tissue engineering is studied. P/D nanofiber topography enables EC and SMC attachment. The endothelial phenotype is maintained for at least 14 d. P/D nanofibers support a stable confluent layer of ECs, and the morphology in SMCs suggests that nanofibers promote a shift to a quiescent contractile phenotype.

    10. Electroactive Electrospun Polyaniline/Poly[(L-lactide)-co-(ε-caprolactone)] Fibers for Control of Neural Cell Function (pages 402–411)

      Suk Ho Bhang, Sung In Jeong, Tae-Jin Lee, Indong Jun, Yu Bin Lee, Byung-Soo Kim and Heungsoo Shin

      Version of Record online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrically conductive electrospun fibers are prepared from blends of PAni and PLCL. PC12 neural cells show significantly higher viability and differentiation on fibers with PAni than on PLCL-only, displaying outgrowth of neurites guided to the direction of the underlying fibers. These results suggest that electroactive fibers may hold promise as a guidance scaffold for neuronal tissue engineering.

    11. Prostate-Cancer-Targeted N-(2-Hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide Copolymer/Docetaxel Conjugates (pages 412–422)

      Jihua Liu, Pavla Kopečková, Huaizhong Pan, Monika Sima, Patrick Bühler, Philipp Wolf, Ursula Elsässer-Beile and Jindřich Kopeček

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100340

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      HPMA copolymer/DTX/3F/11 antibody conjugates possess binding affinities to PSMA-expressing prostate cancer C4-2 cells in the order of 10−9 M. All DTX-containing conjugates are efficiently cytotoxic with IC50 values of 5–10 × 10−9 M. In vivo experiments on nude mice bearing prostate cancer C4-2 xenografts demonstrate enhanced tumor accumulation, favorable pharmacokinetics, and tumor growth inhibition.

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