Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 4

April 2012

Volume 12, Issue 4

Pages 427–566

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 4/2012

      Rylie A. Green, Rachelle T. Hassarati, Josef A. Goding, Sungchul Baek, Nigel H. Lovell, Penny J. Martens and Laura A. Poole-Warren

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290012

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      Cover: Conductive hydrogels are softer, more mechanically robust materials for tissue interfacing devices where conductivity is desirable. The biologically active, anionic hydrogel component effectively and stably dopes the conducting polymer component to form an electroactive material which supports neural cell survival and growth. Further details can be found in the article by R. A. Green,* R. T. Hassarati, J. A. Goding, S. Baek, N. H. Lovell, P. J. Martens, and L. A. Poole-Warren on page 494.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 4/2012

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290013

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 4/2012 (pages 427–431)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290011

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Two-Component In situ Forming Supramolecular Hydrogels as Advanced Biomaterials in Vitreous Body Surgery (pages 432–437)

      Indra Böhm, Falko Strotmann, Carsten Koopmans, Isabel Wolf, Hans-Joachim Galla and Helmut Ritter

      Article first published online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100357

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      Host–guest hydrogels of polymeric CD and an adamantyl-modified polymer provide a new functional biomaterial. Detailed analytical results prove that the biocompatibility reaching control levels and completely overrides the cytotoxic effects. The advantage of this system to form a hydrogel in situ possesses applications as artificial vitreous body replacement.

    2. Folic Acid-Decorated Nanocomposites Prepared by a Simple Solvent Displacement Method (pages 438–445)

      Markus Benfer, Regina Reul, Thomas Betz and Thomas Kissel

      Article first published online: 20 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100344

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      Nanocomposites from blends of folic acid-carrying polyplexes with PLGA are presented, combining biodegradability and requirements for gene delivery and FR targeting. The solvent displacement technique is suitable for formation of nanospheres with diameters below 250 nm. Incorporation of PEGylated polyplexes provides a prerequisite for targeted gene delivery by carrying folic acid on its surface.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Signaling Pathways of Immobilized FGF-2 on Silicon-Substituted Hydroxyapatite (pages 446–453)

      María de la Concepción Matesanz, María José Feito, Cecilia Ramírez-Santillán, Rosa María Lozano, Sandra Sánchez-Salcedo, Daniel Arcos, María Vallet-Regí and María-Teresa Portolés

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100456

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      Effective strategies for regenerating damaged tissues require a combination of biological macromolecules, biomaterials, and cells to mimic the cellular microenvironment where specific signals control the healing process. Immobilized FGF-2 on Si-HA interacts with bone cells, stimulating crucial signaling mechanisms as PLCγ and MAPK/ERK pathways in Saos-2 osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts.

    2. Competitive Cellular Uptake of Nanoparticles Made From Polystyrene, Poly(methyl methacrylate), and Polylactide (pages 454–464)

      Anita Höcherl, Martin Dass, Katharina Landfester, Volker Mailänder and Anna Musyanovych

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100337

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      The uptake behavior of negatively charged fluorescent nanoparticles made from different polymers [PS, PMMA, and PLLA] is studied on HeLa cells. In competitive uptake studies two different types of particles are co-incubated. The obtained results indicate a mutual influence of the particles on their uptake behavior.

    3. Fluorescently Labeled Branched Polymers and Thermal Responsive Nanoparticles for Live Cell Imaging (pages 465–474)

      Dr. Di Zhou, Dr. Yujie Ma, Dr. André A. Poot, Prof. Pieter J. Dijkstra and Prof. Jan Feijen

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100254

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      Branched poly(methoxy-PEG acrylate) and thermally responsive poly(methoxy-PEG acrylate)-block-poly(NIPAM) are synthesized by RAFT polymerization. The fluorescently labeled branched polymer and thermally responsive nanoparticles are effective probes for the imaging of both HUVECs in vitro and the CAM membrane in vivo, in which the blood vessels are not stained but appear as black images.

    4. Injectable Hydrogel for Sustained Protein Release by Salt-Induced Association of Hyaluronic Acid Nanogel (pages 475–483)

      Takashi Nakai, Tai Hirakura, Yuji Sakurai, Tsuyoshi Shimoboji, Masaki Ishigai and Kazunari Akiyoshi

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100352

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      Hyaluronic acid nanogels act as an in situ gelling depot system for proteins. HA nanogels spontaneously bind various types of proteins without denaturation and exhibit unique colloidal properties depending on the ionic strength of the medium. Salt-induced hydrogels are formed by association of the HA nanogels. The HA nanogel system achieves a sustained release of rhGH over 1 week in rats.

    5. Photocrosslinked Co-Networks from Glycidylmethacrylated Gelatin and Poly(ethylene glycol) Methacrylates (pages 484–493)

      Benjamin F. Pierce, Giuseppe Tronci, Martin Rößle, Axel T. Neffe, Friedrich Jung and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100232

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      Tailorable gelatin- and PEG-based hydrogel co-networks were photopolymerized without the addition of a potentially toxic photoinitiator. These networks showed controlled swelling and mechanical properties according to the amount of PEG-dimethacrylate or PEG-monomethacrylate included. This approach of photocrosslinking biopolymer-based hydrogels has potential for applications in regenerative therapies.

    6. Conductive Hydrogels: Mechanically Robust Hybrids for Use as Biomaterials (pages 494–501)

      Rylie A. Green, Rachelle T. Hassarati, Josef A. Goding, Sungchul Baek, Nigel H. Lovell, Penny J. Martens and Laura A. Poole-Warren

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100490

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      New hybrid conductive hydrogels are developed to address the poor mechanical properties of conventional conductive polymers. These interpenetrating networks of CPs and hydrogels have electrical properties comparable to homogeneous CPs but are softer, flexible and more cohesive. Additionally, the hydrogel network can be modified with biomolecules to produce materials with tailored bioactivity.

    7. Targeting of Multidrug-Resistant Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells With Anti-P-Glycoprotein Antibody Conjugates (pages 502–514)

      Kirk D. Fowers and Jindřich Kopeček

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100350

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      A monoclonal Pgp antibody, UIC2, is used to target N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer/drug conjugates. The cytotoxicity, localization, and mechanism of action towards a Pgp expressing multidrug resistant human ovarian carcinoma A2780/AD cell line are investigated. The specificity of the conjugates is confirmed by experiments with the sensitive A2780 cell line, which does not express Pgp.

    8. Amphiphilic Cholic-Acid-Modified Dextran Sulfate and its Application for the Controlled Delivery of Superoxide Dismutase (pages 515–524)

      Yubing Xiong, Jianing Qi and Ping Yao

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100367

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      Cholic-acid-modified dextran sulfate self-assembles into stable nanoparticles in water. The loading of SOD can destroy the self-aggregation of DS-CA, forming smaller SOD/DS-CA complex particles. The release behavior of SOD/DS-CA particles is propitious to protect the SOD in digestive tract. Increasing the CA substitution degree of DS-CA can significantly enhance the cellular uptake of the loaded SOD.

    9. Controlled/Living Surface-Initiated ATRP of Antifouling Polymer Brushes from Gold in PBS and Blood Sera as a Model Study for Polymer Modifications in Complex Biological Media (pages 525–532)

      Cesar Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Erol Hasan, Ognen Pop-Georgievski, Milan Houska, Eduard Brynda and Aldo Bologna Alles

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100425

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      The first living/controlled surface initiated polymerization of an oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate in near-physiological conditions and in blood sera is presented. Block copolymers with ultra-low fouling carboxybetaine acrylamide are prepared. The optimized conditions achieved might be used to immunocamouflage biological entities and biosurfaces via ‘grafting from’ antifouling polymer chains.

    10. PEGylated Click Polypeptides Synthesized by Copper-Free Microwave-Assisted Thermal Click Polymerization for Selective Endotoxin Removal from Protein Solutions (pages 533–546)

      Jinshan Guo, Fanbo Meng, Xiaoyuan Li, Mingzhe Wang, Yanjuan Wu, Xiabin Jing and Yubin Huang

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100394

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      PEG-CPs containing α-amino side groups are synthesized via microwave-assisted copper-free thermal click polymerization for selective endotoxin removal from protein solutions. After immobilizing the PEG-CPs onto polystyrene microspheres, the adsorbents exhibit excellent endotoxin removal selectivity from BSA solution.

    11. Novel Biodegradable and pH-Sensitive Poly(ester amide) Microspheres for Oral Insulin Delivery (pages 547–556)

      Pan He, Zhaohui Tang, Lin Lin, Mingxiao Deng, Xuan Pang, Xiuli Zhuang and Xuesi Chen

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100358

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      Biodegradable dual amino acid based poly(ester amide) microspheres are fabricated and used as a novel vehicle for oral insulin delivery. The pH-triggered in vitro release profiles indicate that this carrier can protect the loaded insulin in the stomach and provide sustained release in the intestine. This oral insulin delivery system has a significant hypoglycemic effect in a diabetic rat model.

    12. Preparation of Biodegradable Polylactide Microparticles via a Biocompatible Procedure (pages 557–566)

      Riccardo Levato, Miguel A. Mateos-Timoneda and Josep A. Planell

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100383

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      Ethyl lactate, a non-toxic solvent, is used to obtain polylactide microparticles. Spherical microparticles with reduced size polydispersity are prepared via solution jet atomization/droplet solidification in a non-solvent bath. Microparticles with interesting Janus surface roughness distribution and microporous interior morphology are loaded with rhodamine B.

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