Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 8

August 2012

Volume 12, Issue 8

Pages 1003–1144

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012

      Yeonju Lee and Kurt E. Geckeler

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290028

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      Front Cover: The interactions between paclitaxel-loaded carbon nanotubes and barrier-forming cells Caco-2 are studied. The cover image illustrates the paclitaxel (blue)-encapsulated by the polymer (yellow) and then loaded onto nanotubes (gray) and their interactions in confluent Caco-2 cells (tight junction, ZO-1, visualized by red fluorescence). Further details can be found in the article by Y. Lee and K. E. Geckeler* on page 1060.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012

      Moom Sinn Aw, Jonas Addai-Mensah and Dusan Losic

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290029

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      Back Cover: The cover features the first demonstration of delayed drug release from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays engineered by electrochemical anodization on Ti. Polymer micelles as drug carriers encapsulated with drug were loaded at the bottom of the nanotube structures and their delayed release was obtained by loading blank micelles (without drug) on the top. Further details can be found in the article by M. Sinn Aw, J. Addai-Mensah, and D. Losic* on page 1048.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290030

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012 (pages 1003–1008)

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290025

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290026

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      This issue of Macromolecular Bioscience contains articles of the Special Series “Advanced Polymers in Stem Cell Biology & Medicine”.

  6. Special Article Series - Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Orchestrating Cell/Material Interactions For Tissue Engineering of Surgical Implants (pages 1010–1021)

      Achala de Mel, Alexander M. Seifalian and Martin A. Birchall

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200039

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      Tissue engineering scaffolds can be bio-functionalised to present receptor-specific ligands. Such surface modifications can be fine-tuned with the aid of nanotechnology for tailored cell/material interactions. Bio-functionalised nanoparticles can be used for live monitoring of cell/material interactions and biocompatibility.

  7. Special Article Series - Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Mineralized Synthetic Matrices as an Instructive Microenvironment for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (pages 1022–1032)

      Ameya Phadke, Yu-Ru V. Shih and Shyni Varghese

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100289

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      The development of a synthetic material mimicking the mineralized composite structure of bone is described by Shyni Varghese and colleagues. This material (TOC figure, left) can direct the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (TOC figure, right) even without the addition of osteogenic supplements to culture medium, as compared to unmineralized materials.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Biosci. 8/2012

      Yongxing Liu, Lyndon F. Charles, Thomas I. Zarembinski, Kalle I. Johnson, Sarah K. Atzet, Robin L. Wesselschmidt, Mark E. Wight and Liisa T. Kuhn

      Article first published online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201290027

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      Frontispiece: Animal-free culture methods are needed to realize the clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives. Our work shows the benefits of commercially available hyaluronan hydrogels to support the maintenance and pluripotency of both mouse embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells. Further details can be found in the article by Y. Liu, L. F. Charles, T. I. Zarembinski, K. I. Johnson, S. K. Atzet, R. L. Wesselschmidt, M. E. Wight, and L. T. Kuhn* on page 1034.

  9. Special Article Series - Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Modified Hyaluronan Hydrogels Support the Maintenance of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (pages 1034–1042)

      Yongxing Liu, Lyndon F. Charles, Thomas I. Zarembinski, Kalle I. Johnson, Sarah K. Atzet, Robin L. Wesselschmidt, Mark E. Wight and Liisa T. Kuhn

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200043

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      Animal-free culture methods that retain pluripotent characteristics of stem cells are needed in order to realize the clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives. Our work shows the benefits of commercially available hyaluronan hydrogels to support the maintenance and pluripotency of both mouse embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells throughout prolonged culture.

  10. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Novel Peptide-Shelled Dendrimer with Dramatically Changeable Thermo-Responsive Character (pages 1043–1047)

      Tomoyuki Koga, Masayuki Iimura and Nobuyuki Higashi

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100509

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      An elastin-like peptide-shelled poly(amidoamine) dendrimer is newly synthesized and the resulting peptide/dendrimer shows unique thermo-responsive behavior. A pH-controlled drastic change in LCST (ΔLCST = 38 K) is achieved as a result of cooperative interplay between the folding state of the ELP shell and the ionized state of the dendrimer core.

    2. Polymer Micelles for Delayed Release of Therapeutics from Drug-Releasing Surfaces with Nanotubular Structures (pages 1048–1052)

      Moom Sinn Aw, Jonas Addai-Mensah and Dusan Losic

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200012

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      A local drug delivery system with delayed release based on titania nanotube arrays electrochemically engineered on Ti surface and polymer micelles as drug carriers is presented. The delayed and time-controlled drug release is successfully demonstrated by controlling the ratio of blank and drug loaded-micelles.

    3. Direct Biomolecule Binding on Nonfouling Surfaces via Newly Discovered Supramolecular Self-Assembly of Lysozyme under Physiological Conditions (pages 1053–1059)

      Peng Yang

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200092

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      The preparation of a non-fouling surface directly ready for biomolecule binding is described. Lysozyme or biotin-lysozyme in HEPES buffer with a certain amount of TCEP added undergo a fast phase transition and finally bind irreversibly onto a protein-resistant surface.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Special Article Series - Review
    8. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Special Article Series - Full Paper
    11. Communication
    12. Full Papers
    1. Cellular Interactions of a Water-Soluble Supramolecular Polymer Complex of Carbon Nanotubes with Human Epithelial Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Cells (pages 1060–1067)

      Yeonju Lee and Kurt E. Geckeler

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200085

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interactions between paclitaxel-loaded carbon nanotubes and different cells such as the human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells are studied. A synthetic polyampholyte in conjunction with the nanotubes is used as a carrier for the paclitaxel. The paclitaxel-loaded nanotubes are found to exhibit a significant anti-cancer effect.

    2. Antimicrobial Hydantoin-Containing Polyesters (pages 1068–1076)

      Licheng Tan, Samarendra Maji, Claudia Mattheis, Mengyao Zheng, Yiwang Chen, E. Caballero-Díaz, Pilar Rivera Gil, Wolfgang J. Parak, Andreas Greiner and Seema Agarwal

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100520

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      An efficient method for the preparation of antibacterial polyesters with pendent N-halamine moieties is presented. The polyesters exhibit better thermal stabilities than PBS, are less toxic than PEI and show very high cell viabilities. The N-halamine form displays antimicrobial activity against E. coli. The copolyesters thus possess a considerable potential as antibacterial additives.

    3. Enzymatic Mineralization of Hydrogels for Bone Tissue Engineering by Incorporation of Alkaline Phosphatase (pages 1077–1089)

      Timothy E. L. Douglas, Philip B. Messersmith, Safak Chasan, Antonios G. Mikos, Eric L. W. de Mulder, Glenn Dickson, David Schaubroeck, Lieve Balcaen, Frank Vanhaecke, Peter Dubruel, John A. Jansen and Sander C. G. Leeuwenburgh

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100501

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      Enzymatic mineralization of three hydrogel biomaterials with calcium phosphate (CaP) is achieved by functionalization with alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Characterization of the hydrogels collagen type I, cPEG, and OPF reveals different degrees of mineralization, suggesting the possibility of enhancing mineralization for bone tissue engineering by the choice of hydrogel.

    4. Oxidized Dextran as Crosslinker for Chitosan Cryogel Scaffolds and Formation of Polyelectrolyte Complexes between Chitosan and Gelatin (pages 1090–1099)

      Dmitriy Berillo, Linda Elowsson and Harald Kirsebom

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200023

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      The formation of PECs between chitosan and gelatin under subzero conditions in a one-step preparation using oxidized dextran as a crosslinker is presented. These scaffolds exhibit a heterogeneous structure with macropores and mesoporous pore walls. Fibroblast cultures show that the PEC-based materials have better cell growth compared to scaffolds with no PEC.

    5. Polyampholyte Nanoparticles Prepared by Self-Complexation of Cationized Poly(γ-glutamic acid) for Protein Carriers (pages 1100–1105)

      Heyun Shen, Takami Akagi and Mitsuru Akashi

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200062

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      Novel polyampholyte NPs are prepared by self-complexation of a single amphoteric poly(amino acid). This is the first time to observe such a nanostructure formation of a single amphoteric poly(amino acid) by simply dissolving in water. Both size and surface charge of the nanoparticles can be easily regulated by changing the grafting degree of cationic amino acid.

    6. Bioactivity and Viscoelastic Characterization of Chitosan/Bioglass® Composite Membranes (pages 1106–1113)

      Sofia G. Caridade, Esther G. Merino, Natália M. Alves and João F. Mano

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200036

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      New chitosan/bioglass® composite membranes are shown to induce the precipitation of apatite upon immersion in SBF. The biomineralization process is followed by using DMA both offline and online. Such non-destructive monitoring can be useful in predicting the performance of bioactive implants upon implantation.

    7. Partial Hydrolysis of Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) and Potential Implications for Biomedical Applications? (pages 1114–1123)

      Huub P. C. Van Kuringen, Joke Lenoir, Els Adriaens, Johan Bender, Bruno G. De Geest and Richard Hoogenboom

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200080

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      Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) is shown to be stable against hydrolysis under physiological conditions. Up to 10% hydrolysis may occur before the thermal and solubility properties are significantly altered. Partially hydrolyzed PEtOx with up to 10% hydrolysis does not induce slug mucosal irritation and shows no cytotoxicity, demonstrating that partial hydrolysis does not limit biomedical applications.

    8. Heterobifunctional Poly(ethylene glycol) Derivatives for the Surface Modification of Gold Nanoparticles Toward Bone Mineral Targeting (pages 1124–1136)

      Gamal M. S. Zayed and Joerg K. V. Tessmar

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200046

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      Functional PEG derivatives are very useful for the modification of surfaces for biomedical applications. The synthesis and application of bifunctional polymers is described that are suited to modify gold nanoparticles for bone mineral targeting. The obtained particles are stable in protein and salt containing solutions and show good binding strength to bone mineral.

    9. Protein Conformational Studies for Macromolecularly Imprinted Polymers (pages 1137–1144)

      David R. Kryscio, Michael Q. Fleming and Nicholas A. Peppas

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201200068

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      Systematic circular dichroism studies unambiguously demonstrate that frequently employed monomers have deleterious effects on the secondary structure of BSA. If the template structure is being altered prior to polymerization, specific recognition cannot be achieved. These results are significant as they provide a rational explanation for limited success in macromolecularly imprinted polymers.

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