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Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Macromolecular Bioscience

January 2014

Volume 14, Issue 1

Pages 1–150

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    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
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    8. Communication
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      Cover Picture: Macromol. Biosci. 1/2014 (page 1)

      Koon-Yang Lee, Gizem Buldum, Athanasios Mantalaris and Alexander Bismarck

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470001

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      Front Cover: Acetobacter xylinum bacteria produce highly crystalline bacterial cellulose. Alexander Bismarck and team show on page 10 how this type of nanocellulose has various biomedical applications due to its high water retention and serves as excellent reinforcement for advanced polymer composites because of its high stiffness and strength.

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      Back Cover: Macromol. Biosci. 1/2014 (page 151)

      Rachmawati Rachmawati, Albert J. J. Woortman and Katja Loos

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470004

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      Back Cover: Amylose and polytetrahydrofuran have the ability to form highly crystalline inclusion complexes which show interesting behavior in organic solvents. On page 56, Katja Loos and colleagues show how the selfassembly of the complexes as lamellae further emphasizes their potential in supramolecular chemistry. Cover design by Alessio Marcozzi.

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      Masthead: Macromol. Biosci. 1/2014 (page 2)

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470002

  4. Contents

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      Contents: Macromol. Biosci. 1/2014 (pages 3–7)

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470003

  5. Editorial

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      Online Only – Ready for the Change! (pages 8–9)

      Kirsten Severing

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300542

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      More Than Meets the Eye in Bacterial Cellulose: Biosynthesis, Bioprocessing, and Applications in Advanced Fiber Composites (pages 10–32)

      Koon-Yang Lee, Gizem Buldum, Athanasios Mantalaris and Alexander Bismarck

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300298

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      Bacterial cellulose (BC) is one of the stiffest organic materials produced by nature. It is a type of highly crystalline cellulose produced by bacteria as nanofibers inherently. BC has found its way in various biomedical applications and serves as excellent nanoreinforcement for polymers to manufacture high performance advanced fiber composites.

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      Cholesterol Modification of (Bio)Polymers Using UV-Vis Traceable Chemistry in Aqueous Solutions (pages 33–44)

      Kasper F. Rasmussen, Anton A. A. Smith, Pau Ruiz-Sanchis, Katrine Edlund and Alexander N. Zelikin

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300286

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      Thiol-disulfide chemistry, cyclodextrin-assisted solubilization, and tools of RAFT polymerization are successfully implemented to accomplish cholesterol functionalization of synthetic polymers, peptides, and hydrogels. The techniques developed are expected to broaden the scope and utility of cholesterol in biomaterials design.

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      Osteogenetic Properties of Electrospun Nanofibrous PCL Scaffolds Equipped With Chitosan-Based Nanoreservoirs of Growth Factors (pages 45–55)

      Alice Ferrand, Sandy Eap, Ludovic Richert, Stéphanie Lemoine, Deepak Kalaskar, Sophie Demoustier-Champagne, Hassan Atmani, Yves Mély, Florence Fioretti, Guy Schlatter, Liisa Kuhn, Guy Ladam and Nadia Benkirane-Jessel

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300283

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      Nanofibrous scaffolds of poly-ϵ-caprolactone are rendered osteogenetic by incorporation of BMP-2 growth factor. The layer-by-layer method is implemented to combine FDA-approved BMP-2 and chitosan within the form of fish scale-like nanoreservoirs covering the nanofibers. The osteoconductive potential of the scaffolds is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, opening a route toward efficient bone regeneration at reduced risk and cost level.

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      Solvent-Responsive Behavior of Inclusion Complexes Between Amylose and Polytetrahydrofuran (pages 56–68)

      Rachmawati Rachmawati, Albert J. J. Woortman and Katja Loos

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300174

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      Inclusion complexes between amylose and polytetrahydrofuran can be conveniently prepared by direct mixing using water as medium. The resulting complexes are crystalline, stable, and responsive to temperature and organic solvents. Additionally, the complexes are self-assembling in the form of lamellae. This self-organization is highly appealing and can be applied in supramolecular chemistry.

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      Novel Insights Into Appropriate Encapsulation Methods for Bioactive Compounds Into Polymers: A Study With Peptides and HDAC Inhibitors (pages 69–80)

      Dorle Hennig, Stephanie Schubert, Harald Dargatz, Evi Kostenis, Alfred Fahr, Ulrich S. Schubert, Thorsten Heinzel and Diana Imhof

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300213

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      Successful encapsulation of bioactive peptides and HDAC inhibitor Ex527 is demonstrated for different nanoparticles. Small peptides are incorporated depending on both net charge of peptide and charge of polymer. Incorporation of Ex527 is efficient for several types of NPs. Encapsulated compounds maintain full activity, providing potential material for cancer treatment in case of Ex527.

  7. Communication

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      Stimuli-Responsive Spherical Brushes Based on D-Galactopyranose and 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl Methacrylate (pages 81–91)

      Hülya Arslan, André Pfaff, Yan Lu, Petr Stepanek and Axel H. E. Müller

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300290

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      Spherical brushes composed of a polystyrene core and arms of poly(methacryloyl-D-galactopyranose)-block-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), synthesized by ATRP, show pH- and temperature responsive behavior.

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      In Vitro Evaluation of HPMA-Copolymers Targeted to HER2 Expressing Pancreatic Tumor Cells for Image Guided Drug Delivery (pages 92–99)

      Brandon Buckway, Yongjian Wang, Abhijit Ray and Hamidreza Ghandehari

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300167

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      N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers for image guided drug delivery in pancreatic cancer are synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in vitro. The HPMA constructs contain an anti-cancer drug gemcitabine, a HER2 targeting ligand, and chelator of 111In3+. Results demonstrate that conjugates are able to bind to HER2 positive expressing pancreatic tumor cell lines and retained anti-cancer characteristics.

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      Reversal of Lung Cancer Multidrug Resistance by pH-Responsive Micelleplexes Mediating Co-Delivery of siRNA and Paclitaxel (pages 100–109)

      Haijun Yu, Zhiai Xu, Xianzhi Chen, Leilei Xu, Qi Yin, Zhiwen Zhang and Yaping Li

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300282

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      Cationic PDMA-b-PDPA micellar nanoparticles with dual pH-responsive property are developed for co-delivery of siRNA and anti-cancer drugs. The in vitro cell study shows that siRNA-Bcl-2-loaded PDMA-b-PDPA micelleplexes could sensitize multidrug resistance A549 lung cancer cells to PTX treatment by suppressing Bcl-2 expression.

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      Antitumor Efficacy of Doxorubicin-Loaded Laponite/Alginate Hybrid Hydrogels (pages 110–120)

      Mara Gonçalves, Priscilla Figueira, Dina Maciel, João Rodrigues, Xiangyang Shi, Helena Tomás and Yulin Li

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300241

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      Doxorubicin-loaded laponite/alginate hydrogels with in situ formability present an in vitro sustained release of nanohybrids that act as vehicles for Dox internalization into cancer cells, thus helping to surpass Dox resistance.

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      Enhanced Cellular Transfection by Ternary Non-Viral Gene Vectors Coupled with Adeno-Associated Virus-Derived Peptides (pages 121–130)

      Ji-Seon Oh, Minah Park, Jung-Suk Kim and Jae-Hyung Jang

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300296

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      Integrating viral components into non-viral gene carriers can be a powerful means to design efficient hybrid gene vectors. A highly simple, versatile approach for developing a ternary non-viral, hybrid gene carrier by adopting an advantageous property (i.e., highly efficient gene delivery capacity) of adeno-associated virus is demonstrated.

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      Development of Multiple Stimuli Responsive Magnetic Polymer Nanocontainers as Efficient Drug Delivery Systems (pages 131–141)

      Leto-Aikaterini Tziveleka, Panayiotis Bilalis, Alexandros Chatzipavlidis, Nikos Boukos and George Kordas

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300212

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      A novel magnetic nanodevice is developed and studied as a drug carrier. Its drug release rate is shown to be pH-, temperature-, and magnetic-field-dependent. The drug-loaded nanocontainers display a cytotoxic effect and an internalization profile comparable to that of the free drug. They could be used for field-triggered drug release after internalization in the target cell.

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      Preparation of Biodegradable Peptide Nanospheres with Hetero PEG Brush Surfaces (pages 142–150)

      Masahiro Matsumoto, Michiya Matsusaki and Mitsuru Akashi

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201300201

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      Controlled hetero poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes composed of higher and lower molecular weight PEG chains are, for the first time, prepared onto biodegradable peptide nanospheres. Hetero PEG2k60%/PEG5k40% demonstrates about 2.5-fold greater anti-protein adsorption properties than homo PEG2k100% or PEG5k40%, and is exceptionally stable in serum for over three weeks. Hetero PEG brush peptide nanospheres will be useful as bioinert drug carriers for biomedical applications.

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