Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 9

September 2014

Volume 14, Issue 9

Pages 1199–1352

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    1. Top of page
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    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
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      Cover Picture: Macromol. Biosci. 8/2014 (page 1199)

      Markus B. Bannwarth, Sandro Ebert, Maximilian Lauck, Ulrich Ziener, Stephanie Tomcin, Gerhard Jakob, Kerstin Münnemann, Volker Mailänder, Anna Musyanovych and Katharina Landfester

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470031

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      Front Cover: On page 1205, K. Landfester and co-workers present tailor-made nanocapsules with integrated superparamagnetic nanoparticles and equipped with a thermolabile shell which possess dual-functionality. After efficient encapsulation of a model dye, a release of the payload can be externally triggered by application of an alternating magnetic field. Additionally, the nanocontainers can act as contrast agents for MRI.

  2. Back Cover

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    1. Back Cover: Macromol. Biosci. 8/2014 (page 1354)

      Markus Hellmund, Haixia Zhou, Olga Samsonova, Pia Welker, Thomas Kissel and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470034

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      Back Cover: Polymerization of the monomers glycerol and GTGE via mini emulsion is shown to form polyglycerol based nanogels with a defi ned size of ≈100 nm by R. Haag and co-workers. On page 1215, these nanogels are functionalized with a varying percentage of amine groups and studied as cationic nanocarrier systems for non-viral DNA delivery. Polyglycerol amine nanogels show a successful cellular uptake and stable polyplex formation due to polyvalent interactions.

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    1. Masthead: Macromol. Biosci. 8/2014 (page 1200)

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201470032

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
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    5. Contents
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    1. Contents: Macromol. Biosci. 8/2014 (pages 1201–1204)

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.mabi201470033

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Full Papers
    1. Tailor-Made Nanocontainers for Combined Magnetic-Field-Induced Release and MRI (pages 1205–1214)

      Markus B. Bannwarth, Sandro Ebert, Maximilian Lauck, Ulrich Ziener, Stephanie Tomcin, Gerhard Jakob, Kerstin Münnemann, Volker Mailänder, Anna Musyanovych and Katharina Landfester

      Article first published online: 9 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400122

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      All-in-one nanocontainers: Tailor-made nanocapsules with integrated superparamagnetic nanoparticles and equipped with a thermo-labile shell possess dual-functionality. After efficient encapsulation of a model dye, a release of the payload can be externally triggered by application of an alternating magnetic field. Additionally, the nanocontainers with encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles can act as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    2. Functionalized Polyglycerol Amine Nanogels as Nanocarriers for DNA (pages 1215–1221)

      Markus Hellmund, Haixia Zhou, Olga Samsonova, Pia Welker, Thomas Kissel and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400144

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      Polyglycerol amine nanogels are studied as cationic carrier systems for non-viral DNA delivery and show successful cellular uptake. These homogeneous nanogels with a size of ≈ 100 nm and a varying percentage of amine groups demonstrate a different polyplex formation behavior due to polyvalency.

    3. Polymersomes from Polypeptide Containing Triblock Co- and Terpolymers for Drug Delivery against Pancreatic Cancer: Asymmetry of the External Hydrophilic Blocks (pages 1222–1238)

      Hermis Iatrou, Konstantinos Dimas, Manos Gkikas, Chrisida Tsimblouli and Sosanna Sofianopoulou

      Article first published online: 19 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400137

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      Model amphiphilic poly(L-lysine hydrochloride)-b-poly(γ-benzyl(d7)-L-glutamate)-b-poly(L-lysine hydrochloride) and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-b-poly(L-lysine hydrochloride) are synthesized. Both form polymersomes in water and are loaded with doxorubicin or paclitaxel. Due to asymmetry of the hydrophilic blocks, poly(ethylene oxide) is always on the periphery. The loaded polymersomes are tested in vivo and in vitro against human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    4. Poly(2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate)-b-Poly(L-Lysine) Cationic Hybrid Materials for Non-Viral Gene Delivery in NIH 3T3 Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (pages 1239–1248)

      Renjith P. Johnson, Saji Uthaman, Johnson V. John, Min Seon Heo, In Kyu Park, Hongsuk Suh and Il Kim

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400071

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      This work investigates new biocompatible polycationic hybrid materials, poly[(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-b-(L-lysine)], as the non-viral gene vectors for pDNA delivery into mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The biocompatible cationic vectors have a great potential as a promising candidate for future gene therapeutic applications.

    5. Injectable In Situ Forming Hybrid Iron Oxide-Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Drug Delivery (pages 1249–1259)

      Yu Zhang, Yi Sun, Xia Yang, Jöns Hilborn, Arend Heerschap and Dmitri A. Ossipov

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400117

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      Iron oxide nanoparticles are encapsulated in the hydrophobic fluorescent core of “click” cross-linkable nanogels of hyaluronic acid. These nanogels are in situ converted into a bulk hydrogel and subsequently liberated through enzymatic degradation of the hydrogel to provide magnetic resonance imaging of the degradation process.

    6. Polylysine Crosslinked AIE Dye Based Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles for Biological Imaging Applications (pages 1260–1267)

      Meiying Liu, Xiqi Zhang, Bin Yang, Liangji Liu, Fengjie Deng, Xiaoyong Zhang and Yen Wei

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400140

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      A novel one-pot method for the fabrication of crosslinked RO-OA-Ply FONs, which occurs at room temperature in air without catalyst or initiator, is discussed. These readily assemble into FONs in pure aqueous solution, exhibiting strong red fluorescence, high water dispersibility, uniform morphology, and excellent biocompatibility, making them potentially suitable for various biomedical applications.

    7. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Maltodextrin-Based Acrylates from Starch and α-Cyclodextrin (pages 1268–1279)

      Wouter M. J. Kloosterman, Gerda Spoelstra-van Dijk and Katja Loos

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400091

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      The cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus macerans is found to catalyze the transglycosidation of 2-(β-glucosyloxy)-ethyl acrylate with starch and α-cylcodextrin to yield novel 2-(β-maltooligooxy)-ethyl-acrylate and methacrylate monomers. The maltooligooxy-acrylate monomers are subsequently polymerized by aqueous free radical polymerization to yield a new kind of comb-shaped glycopolymers.

    8. Charge-Conversional and pH-Sensitive PEGylated Polymeric Micelles as Efficient Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery (pages 1280–1290)

      Gong-Yan Liu, Min Li, Cong-Shan Zhu, Qiao Jin, Zong-Cai Zhang and Jian Ji

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400162

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      Charge-conversion and pH-sensitive PEGylated polymeric micelles with nano-sizes are prepared as drug carries. Anti-cancer drugs can be loaded into the micelle core formed by hydrophobic amide. At acidic tumor environment, the hydrolysis of amide bonds results in a negative-to-positive charge conversion and disassembly of the micelles, with simultaneously pH-triggered drug release.

    9. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting (pages 1291–1298)

      Sezin Yigit, Olena Tokareva, Antonio Varone, Irene Georgakoudi and D. L. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400113

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      A novel design of recombinant spider silk plasmid for gene delivery and nuclear targeting is established by combining endosomal escape unit and a viral transactivation peptide sequence. Non-viral polyplexes formed by condensing pDNA and the recombinant protein show increased localization around nucleus and high-transfection values as well as excellent biocompatibility.

    10. Chitosan Microsphere Scaffold Tethered with RGD-Conjugated Poly(methacrylic acid) Brushes as Effective Carriers for the Endothelial Cells (pages 1299–1311)

      Zhenyi Yang, Shaojun Yuan, Bin Liang, Yang Liu, Cleo Choong and Simo O. Pehkonen

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400136

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      Chitosan (CS) microspheres are functionalized with RGD-poly(methacrylic acid) conjugates by surface-initiated atom transfer polymerization of methacrylate sodium and carbodiimide chemistry of RGD peptide. The favorable cell adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are observed on the RGD-immobilized microspheres as compared the pristine CS microspheres.

    11. Miktoarm Star Polymer Based Multifunctional Traceable Nanocarriers for Efficient Delivery of Poorly Water Soluble Pharmacological Agents (pages 1312–1324)

      Ghareb M. Soliman, Rocio Redon, Anjali Sharma, Diana Mejía, Dusica Maysinger and Ashok Kakkar

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400123

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      Miktoarm stars containing a covalently linked dye self-assemble into inherently fluorescent nanocarriers which perform multiple functions including enhanced hydrophobic drug solubilization, sustained release, and tracking their cellular fate.

    12. Nanoparticles of Esterified Polymalic Acid for Controlled Anticancer Drug Release (pages 1325–1336)

      Alberto Lanz-Landázuri, José Portilla-Arias, Antxon Martínez de Ilarduya, Montserrat García-Alvarez, Eggehard Holler, Julia Ljubimova and Sebastián Muñoz-Guerra

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400124

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      100–300 nm particles of microbial poly(β,L-malic acid), partially esterified with ethanol, degrade in physiological environments to L-malic acid and ethanol. Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded particles steadily release the drug for weeks whereas Temozolomide is fully liberated within hours. These particles are shown to favor internalization of DOX in glioma cells.

    13. Cisplatin Loaded Methoxy Poly (ethylene glycol)-block-Poly (L-glutamic acid-co-L-Phenylalanine) Nanoparticles against Human Breast Cancer Cell (pages 1337–1345)

      Zaheer Ahmad, Zhaohui Tang, Afzal Shah, Shixian Lv, Dawei Zhang, Ying Zhang and Xuesi Chen

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400109

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      Novel cisplatin loaded nanoparticles of poly (amino acids) block copolymers with two different formulations, CDDP/PGlu10 and CDDP/PGlu20, are synthesized. The CDDP-loaded nanoparticles show remarkably longer blood circulation time than free cisplatin. Due to its higher hydrophobic moity content, the CDDP/PGlu10 exhibits enhanced stability and prolonged circulation time as compared to CDDP/PGlu20.

    14. Thermoresponsive Double Network Micropillared Hydrogels for Controlled Cell Release (pages 1346–1352)

      Ruochong Fei, Huijie Hou, Dany Munoz-Pinto, Arum Han, Mariah S. Hahn and Melissa A. Grunlan

      Article first published online: 23 JUN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400172

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      Thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels may achieve “self-cleaning” via thermal cycling to cause cellular detachment. In this work, a double network (DN) design and micropatterning approaches are utilized for enhancing deswelling-driven cell release. DN hydrogels exhibit enhanced thermosensitivity and cell release efficiency versus the conventional single network (SN) hydrogel, particularly for the micropillar arrays.

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