Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 5

May 2015

Volume 15, Issue 5

Pages 583–727

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
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      Cover Picture: Macromol. Biosci. 5/2015 (page 583)

      Min Jee Jang and Yoonkey Nam

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570016

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      Front Cover: Agarose-assisted micro-contact printing uses a stamp covered with agarose thin film, enabling the effective patterning of biomolecules to guide neuronal growth on the substrate. Various patterns including dots with a few micrometers in diameter are also available to be patterned using the method presented by M. J. Jang and Y. Nam on page 613. (Cover designed by M. J. Jang and D. J. Kim.)

  2. Masthead

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    1. Masthead: Macromol. Biosci. 5/2015 (page 584)

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570017

  3. Contents

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    1. Contents: Macromol. Biosci. 5/2015 (pages 585–588)

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570018

  4. Reviews

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    1. The Role of Matrix Compliance on Cell Responses to Drugs and Toxins: Towards Predictive Drug Screening Platforms (pages 589–599)

      Silviya Petrova Zustiak

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400507

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      The compliance of the cellular environment influences cell responses to drugs. When cells are seeded on 2D substrates or in 3D matrices of physiologically relevant stiffness or on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) and subjected to a drug screen, they exhibit different drug sensitivity, where the stiffness-matched material resembles in vivo results more closely than those obtained on the TCP.

    2. Defined Polymeric Materials for Gene Delivery (pages 600–612)

      Dongsheng He and Ernst Wagner

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400524

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      Polymers with precise chemical structure will be useful gene delivery carriers. Due to the different extracellular and intracellular delivery barriers, multiple transport functions have to be incorporated in a site-specific manner into precise molecular backbones. Strategies for the design of such defined carrier materials, including dendrimers, peptides, and sequence-defined oligoaminoamides are reviewed.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
    1. Agarose-Assisted Micro-Contact Printing for High-Quality Biomolecular Micro-Patterns (pages 613–621)

      Min Jee Jang and Yoonkey Nam

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400407

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      A novel surface modification method is presented for a PDMS stamp with agarose hydrogel in order to enhance the micro-contact printing of biomolecules. A thin film of agarose is formed on the stamp by a simple dip-coating procedure, which dramatically enhances the transferability of ink molecules to the substrate and the uniformity of printed patterns.

    2. Tuning the Buffering Capacity of Polyethylenimine with Glycerol Molecules for Efficient Gene Delivery: Staying In or Out of the Endosomes (pages 622–635)

      Bijay Singh, Sushila Maharjan, Tae-Eun Park, Tao Jiang, Sang-Kee Kang, Yun-Jaie Choi and Chong-Su Cho

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400463

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      Non-viral gene delivery vehicles are developed by tuning the buffering capacity of PEI with glycerol molecules. Mechanistic studies reveal that the glycerol-crosslinked PEI appears to trigger macropinocytosis for higher cellular uptake, in addition to clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Independent of endocytic pathway, the endosomal escape of polyplexes depends on the buffering capacity of the polymers, elucidating the intracellular fate of polyplexes.

    3. Polymer Brushes Interfacing Blood as a Route Toward High Performance Blood Contacting Devices (pages 636–646)

      František Surman, Tomáš Riedel, Michael Bruns, Nina Yu. Kostina, Zdeňka Sedláková and Cesar Rodriguez-Emmenegger

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400470

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      Hydrophilic polymer brushes based on HPMA prepared by surface initiated ATRP provide an excellent surface modification to prevent the adhesion of blood components as well as the fouling from whole blood. This surface modification opens new opportunities to improve the performance of blood contacting devices.

    4. Novel Linear Polymers Able to Inhibit Bacterial Quorum Sensing (pages 647–656)

      Eliana Cavaleiro PhD, Ana Sofia Duarte PhD, Ana Cristina Esteves PhD, António Correia PhD, Michael J. WhitcombePhD, Elena V. Piletska PhD, Sergey A. Piletsky PhD and Iva Chianella PhD

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400447

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      The conventional treatment of bacterial infections is based on the administration of antibiotics, which promotes bacterial resistance. The development of linear polymers able to disrupt quorum sensing is presented, as shown by the reduction of bacterial bioluminescence and biofilm formation. The polymers an be used to control bacterial virulence without promoting resistance, thus constituting a safe alternative to the use of antibiotics.

    5. New Ionic bis-MPA and PAMAM Dendrimers: A Study of Their Biocompatibility and DNA-Complexation (pages 657–667)

      Julie Movellan, Rebeca González-Pastor, Pilar Martín-Duque, Teresa Sierra, Jesús M. de la Fuente and José Luis Serrano

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400422

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      Ionic dendrimers are described that consist on quaternary salts of amino-terminated PAMAM and bis-MPA derivatives and biocompatible chains derived from 2-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy]acetic acid. Whereas the PAMAM compounds remain cytotoxic, the I-bis-MPA compound exhibits high loading capacity for pDNA and very low toxicity.

    6. Injectable Hybrid Hydrogels of Hyaluronic Acid Crosslinked by Well-Defined Synthetic Polycations: Preparation and Characterization In Vitro and In Vivo (pages 668–681)

      Daisy Cross, Xiaoze Jiang, Weihang Ji, Wenqing Han and Chun Wang

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400491

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      Hyaluronic acid and well-defined synthetic cationic copolymers form hybrid hydrogels through electrostatic interactions. These materials may have potential medical applications such as injectable carriers for cells.

    7. Improved Gene Transfection Efficacy and Cytocompatibility of Multifunctional Polyamidoamine-Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Particles (pages 682–690)

      Akshay Srivastava, Claire Cunningham, Abhay Pandit and J. Gerard Wall

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400401

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      Multi-functional, cationic HA-based particles are developed by cross-linking HA chains with polyamidoamine (PAMAM). The well segregated, cationized particles complex plasmid DNA efficiently and can be functionalized with recombinant antibody fragments for cell targeting. They exhibit improved transfection efficiency and negligible cytotoxicity toward bovine intervertebral disk cells compared with Superfect or non-cationized particles

    8. Facile Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Amylose–Fatty Acid Inclusion Complexes (pages 691–697)

      Zheng Cao, Albert J. J. Woortman, Petra Rudolf and Katja Loos

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400464

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      Amylose–fatty acid complexes can be prepared by mixing various fatty acids with amylose in hot aqueous solutions. Each fatty acid is selective for a specific fraction of amylose leading to a fractionation effect.

    9. Three-Layered Biodegradable Micelles Prepared by Two-Step Self-Assembly of PLA-PEI-PLA and PLA-PEG-PLA Triblock Copolymers as Efficient Gene Delivery System (pages 698–711)

      Daniel G. Abebe, Rima Kandil, Teresa Kraus, Maha Elsayed, Olivia M. Merkel and Tomoko Fujiwara

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400488

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      Three-layered micelles = (3LM) comprised of two of low MW triblock copolymers PLLA-PEI-PLLA and PLLA-PEG-PLLA are designed to combine electrostatic interaction and solvent-induced condensation of DNA. The 3LM shows efficient encapsulation of DNA, great stability at neutral pH, and efficient DNA release at acidic pH (4.5). A new class of non-viral delivery systems for nucleic acids with superb stability and stealth properties is identified.

    10. Mucus Barriers to Microparticles and Microbes are Altered in Hirschsprung's Disease (pages 712–718)

      Hasan M. Yildiz, Taylor L. Carlson, Allan M. Goldstein and Rebecca L. Carrier

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400473

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      Microparticle and microbial transport through colonic mucus are reduced in an animal model of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) (7-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively). Mucus barrier differences extended beyond the aganglionic colon segment, consistent with development of enterocolitis after surgical removal of aganglionic colon. Therapies geared toward altering the mucus barrier could be explored for preventing HD associated enterocolitis.

    11. Incorporation of Methionine Analogues Into Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin for Click Modifications (pages 719–727)

      Hidetoshi Teramoto and Katsura Kojima

      Article first published online: 2 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400482

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      Clicking the silk: Bombyx mori silk fibroin incorporating unnatural analogues of methionine (Met) is produced. No genetic manipulation of B. mori larvae is necessary for production. Selective modifications of incorporated Met analogues are possible with click chemistry. This study provides a novel approach to modifying the characteristics of silk-based biomaterials.

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