Macromolecular Bioscience

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 7

July 2015

Volume 15, Issue 7

Pages 875–1028

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Macromol. Biosci. 7/2015 (page 875)

      Martin L. Tomov, Zachary T. Olmsted and Janet L. Paluh

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570022

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      Front Cover: On page 892 M. L. Tomov, Z. T. Olmsted, and J. L. Paluh present complex multicystic structures as revealed by Hoechst staining of a human pluripotent stem cell embryoid body (WA09 EB) of 500 micrometer diameter. Self-assembly of three cyst types occurs at this large diameter independent of the method of EB formation by single cells or mechanically passaged multicell intermediates. Uniform EBs are generated in high throughput lithography templated polydimethylsiloxane microarrays followed by lineage commitment in adherent cultures.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
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    1. Masthead: Macromol. Biosci. 7/2015 (page 876)

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570023

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Full Papers
    1. Contents: Macromol. Biosci. 7/2015 (pages 877–880)

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201570024

  4. Feature Article

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    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
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    1. Poly(α-Peptoid)s Revisited: Synthesis, Properties, and Use as Biomaterial (pages 881–891)

      Christian Secker, Sarah M. Brosnan, Robert Luxenhofer and Helmut Schlaad

      Article first published online: 7 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500023

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      Polypeptoids, or poly(N-alkyl glycine)s, are undergoing renaissance in interest because of their immense potential as biologically relevant materials. Here, we review the methods of polypeptoid synthesis by ring-opening polymerization of amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides, polypeptoid bulk and solution properties, self-assembly, and use as biomaterial.

  5. Full Papers

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Feature Article
    6. Full Papers
    1. The Human Embryoid Body Cystic Core Exhibits Architectural Complexity Revealed by use of High Throughput Polymer Microarrays (pages 892–900)

      Martin L. Tomov, Zachary T. Olmsted and Janet L. Paluh

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500051

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      The embryoid body is a classic and important stem cell intermediate used to mimic the three dimensional architecture in early embryos for differentiation. Formation methods for EBs are evolving, necessitating an improved understanding of critical EB parameters for differentiation. Here, a uniform platform of custom polymer microarrays is applied to comprehensively analyze EB formation methods, rate of formation, morphology, size, and differentiation protocols. The size-dependent resilient multicystic core architecture in larger EBs contributes to non-uniformity during early differentiation.

    2. Influence of the Molecular Weight and Charge of Antibiotics on Their Release Kinetics From Gelatin Nanospheres (pages 901–911)

      Jiankang Song, Jim C. E. Odekerken, Dennis W. P. M. Löwik, Paula M. López-Pérez, Tim J. M. Welting, Fang Yang, John A. Jansen and Sander C. G. Leeuwenburgh

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500005

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      Antibiotics are loaded onto gelatin nanospheres using a diffusional post-loading method to form an antibiotic-loaded colloidal gelatin gel (A), colistin and vancomycin are released in a sustained manner for more than 14 d (B), the release of colistin and vancomycin is correlated to the degradation of gelatin nanospheres after the initial burst release (C) which confirms strong interactions between antibiotics and gelatin nanospheres.

    3. Chitosan Grafted with Phosphorylcholine and Macrocyclic Polyamine as an Effective Gene Delivery Vector: Preparation, Characterization and In Vitro Transfection (pages 912–926)

      Ling Li, Fangfang Zhao, Baojing Zhao, Jin Zhang, Chao Li and Renzhong Qiao

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400518

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      Chitosan grafted with phosphorylcholine and macrocyclic polyamine is synthesized to deliver gene. It can efficiently wrap DNA into uniform nanoparticles in the appropriate size and protect DNA from nuclease. It also shows satisfactory water-solubility, low cytotoxicity, high cell uptake and superior in vitro transfection activity. All these results show that it could be used as a promising gene vector.

    4. The Role of Charge Density and Hydrophobicity on the Biocidal Properties of Self-Protonable Polymeric Materials (pages 927–940)

      Simona Matrella, Carmela Vitiello, Massimo Mella, Giovanni Vigliotta and Lorella Izzo

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400503

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      The antimicrobial activity of plaques made of non-water soluble, thermoplastic copolymers A(BC)n (n = 1, 2, 4; A = m-PEG, BC = random chain based on MMA, and a series of alkyl-aminoethyl methacrylates (AAEMA)) was controlled by the surface charge density and by the influence of the N-alkyl groups on the surface morphology. More interestingly for possible applications, it is the absence of hemolitytic activity in all copolymers.

    5. Highly Porous Gelatin Reinforced 3D Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Regeneration (pages 941–952)

      Sofia Amadori, Paola Torricelli, Silvia Panzavolta, Annapaola Parrilli, Milena Fini and Adriana Bigi

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500014

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      Reinforcement with gelatin yields highly porous interconnected 3D scaffolds with significantly improved mechanical properties.

    6. Supramolecular Polyelectrolyte Complexes of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 with Sulfonated Polyrotaxanes to Induce Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation (pages 953–964)

      Masahiko Terauchi, Go Ikeda, Kei Nishida, Atsushi Tamura, Satoshi Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi Harada and Nobuhiko Yui

      Article first published online: 23 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500032

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      Sulfonated polyrotaxanes (S-PRX) composed of sulfonated α-cyclodextrin threaded onto a linear polymer are developed to protect bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) from degradation and deactivation through the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes. The S-PRXs are promising candidates to induce enhanced osteoinduction ability of BMP-2 without toxicity and anticoagulant activity.

    7. An Oligonucleotide Transfection Vector Based on HSA and PDMAEMA Conjugation: Effect of Polymer Molecular Weight on Cell Proliferation and on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (pages 965–978)

      Yanyan Jiang, Chin Ken Wong and Martina H. Stenzel

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500006

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      A drug delivery system for nucleic acid drugs based on a polymer-protein conjugate is synthesized. The protein itself is based on human serum albumin. It is shown that a number-averaged molecular weight inline image of around 20 000 g mol−1 has the highest efficiency in delivering the oligonucleotide ISIS 5132, resulting in the highest toxicity and the most efficient destruction of multicellular breast cancer spheroids.

    8. Bioactive Microsphere-Based Scaffolds Containing Decellularized Cartilage (pages 979–989)

      Amanda J. Sutherland and Michael S. Detamore

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400472

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      Scaffolds are fabricated using sintered PLGA microspheres containing decellularized articular cartilage either encapsulated within the microspheres or coated on the surface of the microspheres. The encapsulated decellularized cartilage constructs show the ability to induce bioactivity in rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, although there is opportunity for improved chondrogenesis.

    9. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Linear and Branched Cationic Peptides: Evaluation as Gene Carriers (pages 990–1003)

      Jose Manuel Ageitos, Jo-Ann Chuah and Keiji Numata

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201400487

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      Branched and linear cationic peptides composed of l-lysine and l-arginine are synthesized by one-pot chemo-enzymatic reaction without using organic solvents or deprotection steps. Those peptides with wide distribution of molecular weights function as gene carriers and demonstrate similar transfection efficiencies to mono-disperse cationic peptides.

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      A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector (pages 1004–1020)

      Zhijian He, Lei Miao, Rainer Jordan, Devika S-Manickam, Robert Luxenhofer and Alexander V. Kabanov

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500021

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      A new “clickable” cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer containing pendant secondary amine groups can form sub-100 nm stable polyplexes with plasmid DNA with very low cytotoxicity and plasma protein binding, and slow cellular uptake. These unique aspects of resulting polyplexes demonstrate potential for systemic and targeted gene delivery in vivo.

    11. Dexamethasone-Conjugated Polyamidoamine Dendrimer for Delivery of the Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene into the Ischemic Brain (pages 1021–1028)

      Pureum Jeon, Manbok Choi, Jungju Oh and Minhyung Lee

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201500058

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      The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene is delivered to ischemic brain using dexamethasone-conjugated polyamidoamine G2 (PAMAM G2-Dexa). In a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) animal model, PAMAM G2-Dexa delivers the HO-1 gene and reduces the infarction volume more significantly than polyethylenimine.

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