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Epoxy-coated bars as corrosion control in cracked reinforced concrete

Authors

  • H. Z. López-Calvo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, 17 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, E3B 5A3, New Brunswick (Canada)
    • Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, 17 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, E3B 5A3, New Brunswick (Canada).
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  • P. Montes-Garcia,

    1. Materials and Construction Group, CIIDIR-IPN-Unidad Oaxaca, Calle Hornos No. 1003, Sta. Cruz Xoxocotlán, C.P. 71230, Oaxaca (México)
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  • I. Kondratova,

    1. National Research Council, Institute for Information Technology, e-business, 46 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, E3B 9W4, New Brunswick (Canada)
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  • T. W. Bremner,

    1. Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, 17 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, E3B 5A3, New Brunswick (Canada)
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  • M. D. A. Thomas

    1. Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, 17 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, E3B 5A3, New Brunswick (Canada)
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Abstract

One of the most common corrosion protection methods in reinforcing concrete bars is the application of fusion-bonded epoxy coatings. Although considerable research has been carried out on the performance of epoxy-coated bars (ECR), there are still many uncertainties about their performance in cracked concrete. In this experimental program, reinforcing steel bars with six types of epoxy coatings embedded in concrete slabs with a 0.4 mm wide preformed crack intersecting the reinforcing steel at right angles were tested. Results of corrosion potentials, corrosion current density, coating adhesion tests, chloride content, and visual examination after 68 months of exposure to a simulated marine environment are reported. Results revealed that under the studied conditions the ECR did not provide total protection of steel reinforcement in cracked concrete. Their use however, tended to reduce significantly the damage caused by the chloride-induced corrosion when compared with the uncoated bars embedded in concrete with similar characteristics.

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