Investigating Interfacial Contributions on the Layer-Thickness-Dependent Mechanical Response of Confined Self-Assembly via Forced Assembly

Authors

  • Tiffani M. Burt,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
    2. Center for Layered Polymeric Systems, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
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  • Alex M. Jordan,

    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
    2. Center for Layered Polymeric Systems, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
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  • LaShanda T. J. Korley

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
    2. Center for Layered Polymeric Systems, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA
    • Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7202, USA.
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Abstract

Understanding block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly under confinement via conventional melt extrusion is advantageous as technology moves towards thin film applications. Previous research has revealed that confining elastomeric BCPs in thin films with polystyrene (PS) via microlayering results in an increase in ductility with decreasing layer thickness and that the interfacial region dramatically influences the elastic modulus. This contribution investigated the role of interfacial width and layer thickness on deformation mechanics by comparing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and PS as wetting layers in confined multilayers. The interfacial region was found to be crucial to tailoring the mechanical response of composite materials.

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