Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

Cover image for Vol. 213 Issue 22

Special Issue: Polymer Research at BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing

November 23, 2012

Volume 213, Issue 22

Pages 2321–2431

Issue edited by: A. F. Thünemann

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    1. Macromol. Chem. Phys. 22/2012 (page 2321)

      Manfred Hennecke and Andreas F. Thünemann

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201290073

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      Front Cover: Polymer science at BAM covers a wide range of different activities and is dedicated to BAM's general mission of “safety”. This includes BAM's participation in standardization and regulation, and its obligation to transfer technology. The activities range from fire retardants to diluted polyelectrolytes in solution. For a more detailed overview of the work of BAM, see the Essay “Past, Present, and Future of Polymer Science at BAM” by M. Hennecke* on page 2327.

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    1. Macromol. Chem. Phys. 22/2012 (page 2436)

      Henrik Seefeldt, Ulrike Braun and Manfred H. Wagner

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201290074

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      Back Cover: Wood plastic composites (WPC) are attracting increasing attention as construction material, as they combine the advantages of the renewable material wood with the form-shaping advantage of the polymer. For a flameretardant configuration various combinations of different flame retardants were tested and offered synergistic effects in WPC to increase their potential. The synergistic effects are caused by mechanical and thermal stabilization of the formed residue. Further details can be found in the article by H. Seefeldt, U. Braun,* and M. H. Wagner on page 2370.

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    1. Macromol. Chem. Phys. 22/2012

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201290075

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  6. Trend Article

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    1. Emergence of Polymer Stereocomplexes for Biomedical Applications (pages 2329–2352)

      Annabelle Bertin

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200143

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      Stereocomplexes of polylactide and poly(methyl methacrylate) are poised to have a big impact in the biomedical field because they offer improved properties and additional possibilities compared to the individual polymers in terms of tunable drug release and degradation rate as well as mechanical strength, not to mention their potential in terms of engineering of macromolecular constructs and surfaces.

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    1. Ion Effects in Field-Flow Fractionation of Aqueous Colloidal Polystyrene (pages 2353–2361)

      Thomas Lang, Kyriakos A. Eslahian and Michael Maskos

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200132

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      Particle characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF-FFF) and thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) in aqueous solution is highly affected by the electrolyte in the carrier liquid. In this feature article, the impact of salinity and ion specificity on fractionation behavior is discussed. Forces acting in the fractionation channel and electrostatic particle–particle and particle–wall forces are highlighted.

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    1. Core-Shell Structures of Oligosaccharide-Functionalized Hyperbranched Poly(ethylene imines) (pages 2362–2369)

      Andreas F. Thünemann, Ralf Bienert, Dietmar Appelhans and Brigitte Voit

      Version of Record online: 7 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201100490

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      The characterization of very stable polyelectrolyte core-shell structures is presented, based on temperature- and pH-dependent SAXS and DLS measurements. We hypothesize that the stability of the observed globular nanostructures is resultant from PEIs' unique combination of branching, charging, and amine group mixture.

    2. Residue Stabilization in the Fire Retardancy of Wood–Plastic Composites: Combination of Ammonium Polyphosphate, Expandable Graphite, and Red Phosphorus (pages 2370–2377)

      Henrik Seefeldt, Ulrike Braun and Manfred H. Wagner

      Version of Record online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200119

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      Combinations of different flame retardants can offer synergistic effects to increase their potential. Here, synergistic effects are used to stabilize the formed residue of a wood–plastic composite flame retarded by expandable graphite. Measurements obtained a disrupted residue, which could be stabilized by addition of ammonium polyphosphate or red phosphorus.

    3. Two-Way Shape Changes of a Shape-Memory Poly(ester urethane) (pages 2378–2385)

      Martin Bothe and Thorsten Pretsch

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200096

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      Phase-segregated poly(ester urethane) exhibits two-way shape changes under various constant stresses. Most distinct actuation (expansion on cooling and contraction on heating) can be detected when the maximum stress applied during a thermo-mechanical pretreatment approaches the point, where deformation-induced crystallization of the poly(1,4-butylene adipate) soft segment sets in.

    4. Phosphorus Polyester — an Alternative to Low-Molecular-Weight Flame Retardants in Poly(Butylene Terephthalate)? (pages 2386–2397)

      Sven Brehme, Thomas Köppl, Bernhard Schartel, Oliver Fischer, Volker Altstädt, Doris Pospiech and Manfred Döring

      Version of Record online: 11 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200072

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      The phosphorus polyester PET-P-DOPO is an interesting alternative to low-molecular- weight additives for the flame retardancy of poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT). In comparison to a common additive, PET-P-DOPO causes a similar reduction in fire risk of PBT without decreasing the tensile strength of PBT, which is an advantage over most low-molecular-weight flame retardant additives.

    5. Oligoepoxide-Based Monoliths: Synthesis and Application as Affinity Capillary Column for Enrichment of Immunoglobulin G (pages 2398–2403)

      Heike S. Pecher, Annett Zimathies and Michael G. Weller

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200206

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      The development of a porous epoxide-based monolith by self-polymerization of polyglycerol polyglycidyl ether and the preparation of a monolithic capillary column (0.5 mm ID) are described. For use as affinity support, the monolith is functionalized with a recombinant protein A to extract immunoglobulin G selectively from rabbit serum.

    6. Copolymer Composition Determined by LC-MALDI-TOF MS Coupling and “MassChrom2D” Data Analysis (pages 2404–2411)

      Steffen M. Weidner, Jana Falkenhagen and Ingo Bressler

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200169

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      MassChrom2D software was used to determine the fraction-dependent copolymer composition obtained by semi-online coupling of liquid chromatography and MALDI-TOF MS using an electrospray/air deposition interface. It clearly shows that different separation principles are responsible for copolymer separation in a chromatographic system and enables a fast response to optimize chromatographic parameters.

    7. Tuning Interfacial Properties and Colloidal Behavior of Hybrid Nanoparticles by Controlling the Polymer Precursor (pages 2412–2419)

      Kishore Natte, Werner Österle, Jörg F. Friedrich, Regine von Klitzing and Guillermo Orts-Gil

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200148

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      The surface curvature and potential of nanoparticles (NPs) are key parameters driving their behavior in biological environments. Here, the properties of organic–inorganic hybrid NPs were tuned by changing the concentration of polymer precursor. Furthermore, BSA was used as a model protein to study the nanoparticle-corona formation.

    8. Confinement Effects on the Molecular Dynamics of Liquid-Crystalline Polymethacrylates—A Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy Study (pages 2420–2431)

      Gamal Turky, Dietmar Wolff and Andreas Schönhals

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200361

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      Broadband dielectric spectroscopy is employed to investigate the molecular dynamics of a liquid-crystalline polymethacrylate with a highly ordered smectic E phase. The relaxation process due to segmental mobility shows a temperature dependence expected for dynamics in nanoconfined space. This is discussed considering the segments confined between liquid-crystalline layers.

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