Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

Cover image for Vol. 214 Issue 2

Special Issue: Dedicated to the 70th Anniversary of Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

January 25, 2013

Volume 214, Issue 2

Pages 121–294

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
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      Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2013 (page 121)

      Peter E. Neerincx and Han E. H. Meijer

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201370004

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      Front Cover: By combining repeated layer addition to create hierarchy and layer multiplication, by static mixing elements in between, a dendritic fractal structure is realized. The harbor morphology combines a large interface with genuine cocontinuity. The tree pictured on the left has 16 leaves; the one on the right hangs 65 000 leaves on 2 branches that connect via 1 trunk to the earth. Further details can be found in the article by P. E. Neerincx,* and H. E. H. Meijer on page 188.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
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      Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2013 (page 296)

      Guojie Zhang, Kostas C. Daoulas and Kurt Kremer

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201370005

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      Back Cover: Polymer molecules (represented by the yellow lines) are coarse-grained into chains of fluctuating soft spheres (represented by the red blobs). They correspond to density clouds representing the spatial distribution of segments of the underlying microscopic sub-chains. Thus the nonbonded interactions can be efficiently calculated from the cloud overlap via a grid (the grey mesh). Further details can be found in the article by G. Zhang, K. C. Daoulas, and K. Kremer* on page 214.

  3. Masthead

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    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2013

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201370006

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2013 (pages 123–127)

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201370007

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
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  6. Essays

    1. Top of page
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      What Are Core Polymer Chemistry and Physics? (pages 132–134)

      Chi Wu

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200417

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      Aside from making existing catalysts and polymerization conditions optimal, polymer chemists should focus on developing new catalysts, new synthetic methods, and new polymerization processes. An area that should be of particular interest is that of bio-catalysts and bio-synthesis because of the inevitable exhaustion of crude oils and natural gases on which the modern polymer industry has been built. For polymer physics, the focus should still lie in the development of novel methodologies to solve remaining fundamental problems that are related to polymer processes by concentrating on correlations between polymer properties and chain structures as well as process conditions.

  7. Talents & Trends

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    1. Microstructure Control: An Underestimated Parameter in Recent Polymer Design (pages 135–142)

      Nezha Badi, Delphine Chan-Seng and Jean-François Lutz

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200475

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      Macromolecular parameters such as tacticity, regioregularity, and co-monomer sequences determine, in large parts, the properties of polymer materials. However, these crucial aspects are currently overlooked by polymer chemists. The present article emphasizes the extreme importance of these parameters in 21st century polymer research.

  8. Review

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    1. Oxidation-Responsive Polymers: Which Groups to Use, How to Make Them, What to Expect From Them (Biomedical Applications) (pages 143–158)

      Enrique Lallana and Nicola Tirelli

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200502

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      Oxidation-sensitive groups can be introduced in polymer materials in the form of metal complexes or simple heteroatoms. The synthesis, key properties, and perspective biomedical applications of these materials are reviewed.

  9. Feature Articles

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      Green Polymer Chemistry and Bio-based Plastics: Dreams and Reality (pages 159–174)

      Rolf Mülhaupt

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200439

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      Dwindling fossil resources, surging energy demand, and global warming account for paradigm change and growing demand for renewable polymer products with low carbon footprint. “Green monomers” from biorefineries, carbon dioxide conversion, and “renewable oil”, gained from plastics' and bio wastes, render synthetic polymers renewable without impairing their property profiles and recycling. Dreams and reality of “green polymers” are highlighted.

    2. Recent Progress in the Development of New Acetylenic Polymers (pages 175–187)

      Rongrong Hu, Jacky Wing Yip Lam and Ben Zhong Tang

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200389

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      Recent progress on functional acetylenic polyarylenes is reviewed. Different polymerization techniques such as Sonogashira polycoupling and polycyclotrimerization are adopted for the construction of linear and hyperbranched polymers. Various functionalities are incorporated into the polymer structures, which endow the resulting polyarylenes with fascinating properties.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Essays
    8. Talents & Trends
    9. Review
    10. Feature Articles
    11. Full Papers
    1. Fractal Structuring in Polymer Processing (pages 188–202)

      Peter E. Neerincx and Han E. H. Meijer

      Version of Record online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200394

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By combining repeated layer addition to create hierarchy and layer multiplication, by static mixing elements in between, a dendritic fractal structure is realized. The harbor morphology combines a large interface with genuine cocontinuity. The tree structure has 65 000 leaves on 2 branches that connect via 1 trunk to the earth.

    2. Resilin-Based Hybrid Hydrogels for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering (pages 203–213)

      Christopher L. McGann, Eric A. Levenson and Kristi L. Kiick

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200412

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      Engineered polypeptide–PEG hydrogels based upon the elastomeric structural protein, resilin, are cross-linked via Michael-type addition reaction between cysteine residues of the protein polymer and the end-functionalized vinyl sulfones of a multi-arm PEG macromer. The precursors quickly form elastic hydrogels and successfully support the adhesion and spreading of human aortic adventitial fibroblasts.

    3. A New Coarse Grained Particle-To-Mesh Scheme for Modeling Soft Matter (pages 214–224)

      Guojie Zhang, Kostas C. Daoulas and Kurt Kremer

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200520

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      An efficient Monte Carlo simulation scheme is developed using a recently proposed model of high-molecular-weight polymeric systems representing the chains as sequences of soft spheres with fluctuating size. The approach is particle based and explicit potentials capture the chain connectivity. The nonbonded interactions are calculated without a neighbor list through a quadratic density functional by mapping the soft spheres on an underlying grid.

    4. Moisture Permeation in Liquid Crystalline Epoxy Thermosets (pages 225–235)

      Lei Nie, Andrew Burgess and Anthony Ryan

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200579

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      Moisture permeation in liquid crystalline thermoset (LCT) is studied. The comparison between LCT and isotropic thermoset reveals structural factors can be the reason for the lower permeability in LCT. Due to the ordered alignment of mesogens, the nanopores between the layers become the major channel for water transport and the tortuosity of the diffusion path is increased. More association between water and trapping sites can take place along the pathway.

    5. Transfer Reactions in Phenyl Carbamate Ethyl Acrylate Polymerizations (pages 236–245)

      Francesca Bennet, Thomas Rölle, Thomas Fäcke, Marc-Stephan Weiser, Friedrich-Karl Bruder, Christopher Barner-Kowollik and Thomas Junkers

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200285

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      The exceptionally rapid polymerization of 2-(phenylcarbamoyloxy)ethyl acrylate (PhCEA) is studied via electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. PhCEA follows acrylate family type behavior and a further increase of the polymerization rate can be achieved by employing a viscous poly(ethylene glycol) matrix.

    6. In-Depth Investigation of Ethylene Solution Polymerization Kinetics With rac-Et(Ind)2ZrCl2/MAO (pages 246–262)

      Saeid Mehdiabadi and João B. P. Soares

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200506

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      A methodology for the determination of the kinetic rate constants for ethylene polymerization with single-site catalysts in a semibatch reactor is developed. The effects of the ethylene concentration, polymerization temperature, and methylaluminoxane (MAO) concentration are studied to determine polymerization and chain-transfer rate constants, including the activation energies. This information is essential for the quantification of reactor design, optimization, and scale-up.

    7. Nanostructured Films of Block Copolymers Functionalized With Photolabile Protected Amino Groups (pages 263–271)

      Jan Stadermann, Maria Riedel and Brigitte Voit

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200409

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      Phase separating block copolymers with photolabile protected amino groups in one block have been synthesized through RAFT polymerization followed by efficient click modification. The block copolymers are used for the preparation of thin films where they assemble to form distinct nanostructures.

    8. Precision Control of Temperature Response by Copolymerization of Di(Ethylene Glycol) Acrylate and an Acrylamide Comonomer (pages 272–279)

      Priyadarsi De and Brent S. Sumerlin

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200416

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      Reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of di(ethylene glycol)ethyl ether acrylate (DEGA) and N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) is investigated. In aqueous solution, the cloud point of their copolymers, poly(DEGA-co-DMA), is able to be controlled in a highly predictable manner by adjusting the copolymer composition.

    9. Characterization of Small Molecule Controlled Release From Silk Films (pages 280–294)

      Daniel J. Hines and David L. Kaplan

      Version of Record online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201200407

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      Cumulative release data of various dyes from silk fibroin films are collected and modeled to confirm the mechanism of release that controls the release rate. The physiochemical properties of the releasing dyes and the material properties of the silk film are compared with estimated kinetics parameters of the release models to characterize parameter–property relationships that may be used for prediction.

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