Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics

Cover image for Vol. 218 Issue 2

Special Issue: Microfluidics and Macromolecules

January 2017

Volume 218, Issue 2

Issue edited by: Sebastian Seiffert

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
    9. Full Papers
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      Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2017

      Sebastian Seiffert

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201770005

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      Front Cover: Microfluidics and macromolecules are a congeniality to foster the understanding and to direct the engineering of polymer-based materials and functional entities. This themed issue spotlights on this synergy, focusing on both the analytical and the preparative benefits of microfluidics in polymer science and engineering. Further details can be found in the article by Sebastian Seiffert (article number 1600280).

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
    9. Full Papers
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      Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2017

      Hao Yuan, Qingming Ma, Yang Song, Matthew Y. H. Tang, Yau Kei Chan and Ho Cheung Shum

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201770008

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      Back Cover: Janus droplets are fabricated by inducing phase separation in droplets consisting of an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). The use of biocompatible ATPS in fabricating the Janus droplets makes them suitable for encapsulating enzymes and cells without significantly compromising their biological activities. The affinity partitioning of the encapsulated ingredients to different ATPS phases facilitates their spontaneous migration into different compartments of the Janus droplets. This is reported by Hao Yuan, Qingming Ma, Yang Song, Matthew Y. H. Tang, Yau Kei Chan, and Ho Cheung Shum* in article number 1600422.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
    9. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2017

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201770006

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
    9. Full Papers
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      Contents: Macromol. Chem. Phys. 2/2017

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201770007

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
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      Macromolecules in Microfluidics: A Synergy for Systems Engineering

      Sebastian Seiffert

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600564

  6. Trends

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      Microfluidics and Macromolecules: Top-Down Analytics and Bottom-Up Engineering of Soft Matter at Small Scales

      Sebastian Seiffert

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600280

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      Microfluidics and polymer science is a congeniality to foster the understanding and to direct the engineering of macromolecular functional entities and materials. This article spotlights upon this synergy from two perspectives, one focusing on the analytical and one on the preparative benefit of microfluidics in polymer science and engineering, regarding both the arts of co-flow laminar and segmented-flow droplet-based microfluidics.

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      Precision Polymer Design in Microstructured Flow Reactors: Improved Control and First Upscale at Once

      Thomas Junkers

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600421

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      The advantages of using microreactors for precision polymer synthesis are highlighted and compared to classical polymerization methodologies, demonstrating that continuous flow reactors do not only lead to improved kinetics of processes, but also to a higher quality of the residual polymers. The field of continuous flow polymerization is still at its start, but the potential is eminent and some future developments are discussed.

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      Mechanically Defined Microgels by Droplet Microfluidics

      Thomas Heida, Jens W. Neubauer, Maximilian Seuss, Nicolas Hauck, Julian Thiele and Andreas Fery

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600418

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      Microfluidic emulsion formation combined with hydrogel design via droplet templates has greatly advanced the application of microgels in cell culturing, sensing and actuation. On that account, exact knowledge and control over physicochemical and mechanical properties is crucial. We discuss recent progress in droplet microfluidics-based design of mechanically defined microgels, their latest applications and characterization methods on single-particle level.

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      Cell Microencapsulation by Droplet Microfluidic Templating

      Torsten Rossow, Philipp S. Lienemann and David J. Mooney

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600380

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      Hydrogel particles in the micrometer range, so called microgels, are excellent candidates to create, in a high throughput manner, a myriad of mimics of the three-dimensional natural extracellular matrix. As a result, microgels have gained importance for the encapsulation of living cells by droplet microfluidics. This trend article highlights and critically reviews current approaches, reveals technical challenges, and shows perspectives for future developments.

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      Microfluidic Studies of Polymer Adsorption in Flow

      Alinaghi Salari and Eugenia Kumacheva

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600328

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      Adsorption of polymer molecules under flow conditions governs a broad range of phenomena, including colloidal stabilization, adhesion, friction, and surface wetting and has a broad range of applications in industry, medicine, and biology. Microfluidic platforms integrated with analytical instrumentation offer the capability to study polymer adsorption in flow in a time- and labour-efficient manner.

  7. Talents

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    1. Polymer Material Design by Microfluidics Inspired by Cell Biology and Cell-Free Biotechnology

      Julian Thiele

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600429

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      Fabrication of hydrogels and vesicles in microfluidic flow cells provides precise control over physicochemical material properties on micro- and nanoscale. Beyond material design, this opens the route towards microscopic experimental platforms that mimic aspects of architecture and function of the natural extra- and intracellular environment, for which microfluidic techniques employing liquid jets and droplets are discussed in this contribution.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Trends
    8. Talents
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Phase-Separation-Induced Formation of Janus Droplets Based on Aqueous Two-Phase Systems

      Hao Yuan, Qingming Ma, Yang Song, Matthew Y. H. Tang, Yau Kei Chan and Ho Cheung Shum

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600422

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      Janus droplets are fabricated by inducing phase separation of an aqueous two-phase system. Without additional steps, phase separation is induced by evaporation of water. The resultant Janus droplets are monodisperse with controlled internal morphology and ratio of the compartments. The approach can be applied for encapsulating bioactive ingredients whose activity needs to be preserved at a relatively high level.

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      Bicolored Janus Microparticles Created by Phase Separation in Emulsion Drops

      Nam Gi Min, Tae Min Choi and Shin-Hyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600265

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      Janus microparticles are prepared by phase separation of two immiscible polymers confined in emulsion drops. Spontaneous staining of selected compartment by dyes renders the microparticles bicolored. Magnetic nanoparticles embedded in the polymer matrix provide a net magnetic moment on the microparticles. Janus microparticles with optical and magnetic anisotropy can be potentially used as active color pigments for reflection-mode displays.

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      High-Throughput Step Emulsification for the Production of Functional Materials Using a Glass Microfluidic Device

      Alessandro Ofner, David G. Moore, Patrick A. Rühs, Pascal Schwendimann, Maximilian Eggersdorfer, Esther Amstad, David A. Weitz and André R. Studart

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600472

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      High-throughput production of monodisperse emulsions is attractive in material-, food-, and pharmaceutical sciences, since it provides precise control to create functional microcapsules and microparticles. This study combines the scalability of step emulsification with the chemical inertness of glass devices to enable the robust and high-volume production of a broad variety of functional materials.

    4. Direct Observation of Alternating Stretch-Coil and Coil-Stretch Transitions of Semiflexible Polymers in Microstructured Flow

      Natalja Strelnikova, Michael Göllner and Thomas Pfohl

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600474

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      The presented studies elucidate the non-Newtonian flow behavior of semiflexible filaments in specific microflows and therefore may have an impact on the analysis as well as sorting of polymers, which may consequently lead to a better understanding of intercellular flows.

    5. Tailoring the Retention of Charged Model Compounds in Polymer Functionalized Paper-Based Microfluidic Devices

      Sonja Wendenburg, Michelle-Lisa Nachbar and Markus Biesalski

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600408

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      Transport of dyes as model compounds is investigated and controlled to yield implications for improving the specificity and sensitivity of paper-based microfluidic devices. Extrinsic parameter (pH, conductivity) as well as tailored modification of fiber surfaces with functional polymers can be used to design multifunctional microfluidic devices based on simple paper stripes.

    6. Rapid Encapsulation of Cell and Polymer Solutions with Bubble-Triggered Droplet Generation

      Zihao Yan, Iain C. Clark and Adam R. Abate

      Version of Record online: 4 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600297

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      A microfluidic device that produces monodispersed droplets at over 100 kHz is described. The design utilizes air-bubbles to trigger periodic jet breakup, segmenting the dispersed phase into drops of uniform size. Emulsification of viscous polymer fluids and the production of cell-loaded drops demonstrate the utility of this approach.

    7. Influence of Fluorinated Surfactant Composition on the Stability of Emulsion Drops

      Gianluca Etienne, Michael Kessler and Esther Amstad

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600365

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      The stability of aqueous drops dispersed in fluorinated oils is investigated. The stability of drops coated with triblock copolymers scales with the interfacial tension. By contrast, the stability of drops coated with diblock copolymers scales with their packing density at the liquid–liquid interface.

    8. Kinetic Control of Block Copolymer Self-Assembly in a Micromixing Device – Mechanistical Insight into Vesicle Formation Process

      Raphael Thiermann, Regina Bleul and Michael Maskos

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600347

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      The application of micromixer technology enables kinetic control during self-assembly of amphiphiles. Thermodynamic instable intermediates can be trapped and highly defined polymer aggregate structures of distinct size and morphology become accessible.

    9. Application of Polyionic Macromolecules in Micro Flow Syntheses of Nanoparticles

      Nikunjkumar Visaveliya, Andrea Knauer and Johann Michael Köhler

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600371

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      The control of molecular interaction and mobility on the one side and the control of transport at the microscale on the other side are combined by the application of polyionic molecules in the microfluidic synthesis (and assembling) of nanoparticles. The concept is applicable for nonspherical metal and polymer composite nanoparticles and can be used with ex-situ and in situ syntheses.

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