Heat-Resistant Fully Bio-Based Nanocomposite Blends Based on Poly(lactic acid)

Authors

  • Anna Nuzzo,

    1. Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Serena Coiai,

    1. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici ICCOM UOS Pisa, Area della Ricerca CNR, Pisa, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sabrina C. Carroccio,

    1. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, CNR-ICTP Unità di Catania, Catania, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nadka Tz. Dintcheva,

    1. Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Aerospaziale, dei Materiali, Università di Palermo, Palermo, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cristian Gambarotti,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Giovanni Filippone

    Corresponding author
    1. Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
    • Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125NaplesItaly

    Search for more papers by this author

  • Supporting Information is available from the Wiley Online Library or from the author.

Abstract

Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is melt mixed with polyamide 11 (PA11) to obtain a heat-resistant fully bio-based blend with PLA as the dominant component. The goal is achieved by adding small amounts of organoclay (OMMT), which is used to manipulate the blend microstructure. The selective positioning of the OMMT inside the PA11 and at the PLA/PA11 interface turns the blend morphology from drop/matrix into co-continuous at high PLA content (70 wt%). The OMMT-rich PA11 framework that interpenetrates the major PLA phase effectively contributes to bear stresses, and the nanocomposite blend keeps its structural integrity up to ≈160 °C, i.e., about 100 °C above the PLA glass transition.mame201300051-gra-0001

Ancillary