Co-Injection Molded New Green Composites from Biodegradable Polyesters and Miscanthus Fibers

Authors

  • Kunyu Zhang,

    1. Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
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  • Vidhya Nagarajan,

    1. Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
    2. School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
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  • Nima Zarrinbakhsh,

    1. Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
    2. School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
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  • Amar K. Mohanty,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
    2. School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
    • Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, GuelphON, Canada N1G2W1

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  • Manjusri Misra

    1. Department of Plant Agriculture, Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
    2. School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G2W1
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Abstract

A novel concept of developing green composites with improved performance using co-injection molding technique has been established. Poly (butylene succinate) (PBS), poly (butylene adipate-co-terephtalate) (PBAT), and their blends were investigated as skin material. Composite core material was made from poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and miscanthus. Co-injected samples with good surface finish were achieved at a skin/core volume ratio of 40/60 and mold temperature of 45 °C. Notched impact strength of 140 J/m, four times higher than that of neat core material and unnotched impact strength of almost 400 J/m with modulus of more than 1 GPa was achieved for the co-injection molded green composites. Good adhesion at the skin/core interface was observed under scanning electron microscopy.mame201300189-gra-0001

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