Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 295 Issue 8

August 11, 2010

Volume 295, Issue 8

Pages 691–781

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 8/2010

      Hideto Tsuji and Tomonori Tsuruno

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201090014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The image presents a permeation model of water vapor through a polylactide amorphous region, the stereocomplex crystal structure, and the helices of poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide). Stereospecific strong interaction between enantiomeric poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide), which can cause stereocomplexation, is found to be effective to increase the water vapor barrier property of polylactide-based materials for a wide range of crystallinities. Further details can be found in the article by H. Tsuji* and T. Tsuruno on page 709.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 8/2010 (pages 691–693)

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201090015

  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Electrospinning of Cellulose-Based Fibers From NaOH/Urea Aqueous System (pages 695–700)

      Haisong Qi, Xiaofeng Sui, Jinying Yuan, Yen Wei and Lina Zhang

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000018

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrospun fibers and particles were for the first time prepared successfully from cellulose solution in a NaOH/urea aqueous system. The pure cellulose solution could be electrospun into particles, whereas bicomponent fibrous materials were obtained from mixtures of cellulose and HMPEG as well as cellulose and PVA.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Controlling Fiber Repulsion in Multijet Electrospinning for Higher Throughput (pages 701–708)

      Arun Kumar, Ming Wei, Carol Barry, Julie Chen and Joey Mead

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.200900425

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel plastic filter multijet electrospinning set-up was designed for controlled fiber repulsion and enhanced electrospinning rates and compared with a multineedle electrospinning system. The electric fields were modeled and compared with the experimental results. The multifiber plastic filter set-up showed lower fiber repulsion, higher throughput, and more uniform fiber diameters compared to the multineedle set-up.

    2. Water Vapor Permeability of Poly(L-lactide)/Poly(D-lactide) Stereocomplexes (pages 709–715)

      Hideto Tsuji and Tomonori Tsuruno

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The water vapor permeability of PLLA or PDLA could be effectively reduced (by 14–23%) by equimolar polymer blending of PLLA and PDLA. Interestingly, the higher barrier property of PLLA/PDLA blends was observed even when they were amorphous. The effect of stereocomplex crystallinity of PLLA/PDLA blends on the WVP was investigated in detail, together with that of homo-crystallinity of pure PLLA and PDLA.

    3. Force-Free Patterning of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers under Solvent Assistance (pages 716–725)

      Lulu Han, Jing Zhou, Xiao Gong, Jie Yang and Changyou Gao

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Force-free micropatterning of PEMs was facilely achieved under the assistance of solvent at elevated temperature within a very short period (15 min). Various patterns including double lines, double strips, meniscus-shaped ridges, and high ridges could be easily formed and tuned by molding temperature and time, multilayer thickness, solvent quality, and multilayer compositions.

    4. Effect of the Deformation Temperature on the Shape-Memory Behavior of Epoxy Networks (pages 726–734)

      Diane M. Feldkamp and Ingrid A. Rousseau

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000035

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shape-memory epoxies with transformation temperatures up to 99 °C and capable of large deformations (up to 68%) are described. The range of achievable deformation is at least tripled by varying the thermal condition during the deformation stage of a shape-memory cycle with no adverse effect to their excellent shape memory characteristics.

    5. Adjustable-Stiffness Films via Integrated Thermal Modulation (pages 735–741)

      Hua Dong and Glenn M. Walker

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000097

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new strategy for fabricating thermally responsive adjustable stiffness materials is demonstrated. Thin films were fabricated that exhibit a low-melting-point material and an integrated microheater. Small changes in electrical current to the microheaters were used to reversibly adjust the Young's modulus of the film ≈100-fold from 1.03 GPa to 10.9 MPa.

    6. Processing, Structure, and Properties of PAN/MWNT Composite Fibers (pages 742–749)

      Rahul Jain, Marilyn L. Minus, Han Gi Chae and Satish Kumar

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PAN/MWNT fibers with up to 20 wt.-% MWNT loading are spun using conventional spinning technologies. At present, this is the highest concentration of carbon nanotubes used in the fabrication of a conventional composite fiber. The figure shows an increase in the PAN Tg and decrease in PAN thermal shrinkage as the concentration of MWNT is increased in the fiber. These results indicate strong PAN/MWNT interfacial interactions, which play an important role toward composite properties, where MWNT show excellent reinforcement of the PAN matrix.

    7. A New Biodegradable Flexible Composite Sheet from Poly(lactic acid)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) Blends and Micro-Talc (pages 750–762)

      Shikha Jain, Murali M. Reddy, Amar K. Mohanty, Manjusri Misra and Anup K. Ghosh

      Article first published online: 14 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000063

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Talc improves the oxygen and water barrier properties of PLA/PCL blends significantly even at very low loadings. This is due to talc localizing in PCL phase and reduced the domain size of PLA in the PLA/PCL/talc composites. It has also reduced extent of voiding between PLA and PCL phases and contributing to the improvement in barrier properties.

    8. Electrospun Hybrid Soy Protein/PVA Fibers (pages 763–773)

      Daehwan Cho, Olivia Nnadi, Anil Netravali and Yong Lak Joo

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rheological properties of soy protein/PVA solutions have been studied. The results have been used to optimize the continuous production of uniform soy protein/PVA nanofibers by electrospinning.

    9. Beneficial Effect of Compatibilization on the Aging of Cellulose-Reinforced Biopolymer Blends (pages 774–781)

      Atef Bessadok, Mohamed Naceur Belgacem, Alain Dufresne and Julien Bras

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201000133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New biocomposite materials were developed using cellulose and a blend of two biopolymers (biodegradable Polyester and PLLA). The cellulosic filler has been compatibilized with the matrix and the target was to check the effect of compatibilization techniques on the aging of the materials. Thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of the blends and composites show that grafting allowed obtaining high-performance composites even after aging.

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