Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 297 Issue 1

January 2012

Volume 297, Issue 1

Pages 3–103

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2012

      Ming Lu, Yiqing Wang, Youping Wu, Yannan Quan, Xiaohui Wu, Liqun Zhang and Baochun Guo

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290001

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      Front Cover: Unlike the normal pristine MMT particles, which are compact and plane-shaped, these spray-dried pristine MMT particles display extraordinary flower-shaped morphologies. This indicates that the rapid evaporation process brought about by the spray-drying method achieves structures made of randomly arranged MMT layers in the granule. Further details can be found in the article by M. Lu, Y. Wang, Y. Wu, Y. Quan, X. Wu, L. Zhang,* and B. Guo on page 20.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2012

      Sung Hyo Lee, Mathieu Bailly and Marianna Kontopoulou

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290002

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      Back Cover: Well-dispersed SiO2 nanoparticles localize exclusively in the PP phase of PP/EOC blends, resulting in a good balance of tensile, flexural, and impact properties. In the presence of nanoparticles, the domain size of the dispersed EOC phase is reduced, as evidenced by simple shear and annealing experiments. Further details can be found in the article by S. H. Lee, M. Bailly, and M. Kontopoulou* on page 95.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2012

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290003

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2012 (pages 3–6)

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290000

  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      No Reason to Celebrate? (pages 7–8)

      Stefan Spiegel

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100421

  6. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Computational Approaches for Studying the Granular Dynamics of Continuous Blending Processes, 2 – Population Balance and Data-Based Methods (pages 9–19)

      Fani Boukouvala, Atul Dubey, Aditya Vanarase, Rohit Ramachandran, Fernando J. Muzzio and Marianthi Ierapetritou

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100054

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      Reduced-order modeling using population balances and data-driven statistical approaches are employed to study continuous powder mixing. These models can be used for process design, optimization, and design space identification with respect to process operating conditions. The computational efficiency of such models renders them appropriate for online optimization and control purposes.

  7. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Preparing Exfoliated MMT/Polymer Nanocomposites by Combined Latex Compounding and Spray-Drying (pages 20–25)

      Ming Lu, Yiqing Wang, Youping Wu, Yannan Quan, Xiaohui Wu, Liqun Zhang and Baochun Guo

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100136

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      A facile route to highly dispersed clay/polymer nanocomposites by combining latex compounding and spray-drying is described. The method can be applied to any latex-formed polymer matrix. HR-TEM and XRD results confirm the excellent dispersion of MMT layers in both the styrene/butadiene rubber matrix and the polystyrene matrix.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Feature Article
    8. Communication
    9. Full Papers
    1. Using Crystallisation Fractionation to Monitor Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of Impact Poly(propylene) Copolymers (pages 26–38)

      Elana de Goede, Peter E. Mallon and Harald Pasch

      Article first published online: 7 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100058

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      ICPP is a complex material and contains various ethylene/propylene copolymers in addition to the majority poly(propylene) phase. TREF and CRYSTAF are used to study the differences in the thermo-oxidative degradation of ICPP. A higher ethylene content increases the thermal stability because a larger fraction of ethylene/propylene copolymer with a lower isotacticity is formed that is less prone to degradation.

    2. Study of Reaction Between a Low Molecular Weight, Highly Functionalized Polyethylene and Hexamethylenediamine (pages 39–50)

      Tayyab Hameed, Patrick J. Quinlan, David K. Potter and Elizabeth Takacs

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100117

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      Mixing torque data from a melt blender for reactions carried out between maleic anhydride-grafted polyethylene and an aliphatic diamine suggest longer reaction times than previously proposed for such systems. Separate mixing torque peaks were observed for melting of polymers and crosslinking resulting from reactions between amines and anhydrides. Analyses suggest that assessing the chemistry and degree of reaction based on the maleic anhydride response in FTIR is misleading.

    3. Dynamic Electrical and Rheological Percolation in Isotactic Poly(propylene)/Carbon Black Composites (pages 51–59)

      Shilin Huang, Zhengying Liu, Chaolu Yin, Yu Wang, Yongjuan Gao, Chen Chen and Mingbo Yang

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100150

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      Well-dispersed carbon-black aggregates can form a filler network in isotactic poly(propylene) melts. The dynamic network formation process shows that a conductive network is easier to be formed than the rheological network. The difference between the two networks is discussed based on the different factors governing the formation of the networks.

    4. Flow-Induced Morphology of iPP Solidified in a Shear Device (pages 60–67)

      Roberto Pantani, Luigi Balzano and Gerrit W. M. Peters

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100158

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      Tests are conducted in a shear device to study the effect of flow on the resulting morphology. It is found that the distribution of the spherulite dimensions can be directly correlated to a parameter connected to the Weissenberg number that also considers the time evolution of molecular deformation. The boundary between the oriented skin layer and the spherulitic core is characterized by a single value of this parameter.

    5. Applying the Traditional Solution Melt Polymerization for the in situ Intercalation of Polyamide 6.6-Clay Nanocomposites (pages 68–74)

      Anastasia C. Boussia, Stamatina N. Vouyiouka and Constantine D. Papaspyrides

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100087

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      Solution melt polymerization followed by extrusion is assessed for the in situ intercalation of PA 6.6/clay nanocomposites, focusing on the influence of the nanofillers as well as on the interactions between monomers and nanofiller. Polymerization enhancement up to ≈75% is found in the presence of fully organically exchanged clays. This is attributed to possible chain extension performance of clay SiOH groups.

    6. You have free access to this content
      Biodegradable Bicomponent Fibers from Renewable Sources: Melt-Spinning of Poly(lactic acid) and Poly[(3-hydroxybutyrate)-co-(3-hydroxyvalerate)] (pages 75–84)

      Rudolf Hufenus, Felix A. Reifler, Katharina Maniura-Weber, Adriaan Spierings and Manfred Zinn

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100063

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      By combining PLA and PHBV in a bicomponent fiber and introducing a new spin pack concept enabling individual temperature control for each polymer flow, the known difficulties with spinning of native PHBV can be overcome. Fibers with PLA as a sheath material are strong enough for the successful construction of a textile fabric. In vitro biocompatibility studies reveal that cells proliferate well along the fibers.

    7. The Effect of the Degree of Branching in Hyperbranched Polyesters Used as Reactive Modifiers in Epoxy Thermosets (pages 85–94)

      David Foix, Anna Khalyavina, Mireia Morell, Brigitte Voit, Albena Lederer, Xavier Ramis and Angels Serra

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100078

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      The effect of the degree of branching (DB) of a hyperbranched polyester added as modifier in DGEBA thermosets has been studied using ytterbium triflate as cationic initiator. High DB accelerates the curing and lowers the viscosity. Thermal stability and chemical reworkability are not affected by the DB but shrinkage exhibits a significant reduction on increasing it. Thermomechanical characteristics are improved with increasing the DB of the modifier.

    8. Morphology and Properties of Poly(propylene)/Ethylene-Octene Copolymer Blends Containing Nanosilica (pages 95–103)

      Sung Hyo Lee, Mathieu Bailly and Marianna Kontopoulou

      Article first published online: 25 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100147

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      The microstructure and mechanical properties of ternary PP/EOC/SiO2nanocomposites are studied. In the presence of a maleated PP compatibilizer, the well-dispersed SiO2 nanoparticles localize exclusively in the PP phase, resulting in a good balance of tensile, flexural, and impact properties. In the presence of nanoparticles the domain size of the dispersed EOC phase is reduced.

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