Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 297 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 297, Issue 7

Pages 599–734

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 7/2012

      Nonjabulo Prudence Gule, Michele de Kwaadsteniet, Thomas Eugene Cloete and Bert Klumperman

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The cover image presents an electrospun nanofibrous membrane composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) and containing AquaQure biocide, so allowing it to exhibit efficient antimicrobial properties. On contact with the nanofibers, loss of bioluminescence is observed for various bacterial strains that were genetically modified with the lux ABCDE operon. Further details can be found in the article by N. P. Gule, M. de Kwaadsteniet, T. E. Cloete, and B. Klumperman* on page 618.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 7/2012

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290021

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 7/2012 (pages 599–603)

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201290019

  4. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. A Novel Approach to Prepare Uniaxially Aligned Nanofibers and Longitudinally Aligned Seamless Tubes Through Electrospinning (pages 604–608)

      Libin Yang, Wangzhang Yuan, Junhong Zhao, Fei Ai, Xiaoyong Chen and Yongming Zhang

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel method to produce uniaxially aligned nanofibers is described that uses no collecting electrodes with a gap inside and no mechanical drawing. Seamless tubes composed of longitudinally aligned nanofibers are obtained, which might prove useful as biomaterials in tissue engineering.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communication
    6. Full Papers
    1. Electrospun Poly(vinyl alcohol) Nanofibres with Biocidal Additives for Application in Filter Media, 1–Properties Affecting Fibre Morphology and Characterisation (pages 609–617)

      Nonjabulo Prudence Gule, Michele de Kwaadsteniet, Thomas Eugene Cloete and Bert Klumperman

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100275

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PVA nanofibres containing AquaQure biocide are successfully prepared via electrospinning from aqueous solutions. The spinning conditions are optimised to obtain nanofibres in the range of 100–300 nm. Glyoxal is used to crosslink the nanofibres, which made them insoluble in water. The antimicrobial activity of the fibres is studied in Part 2 of this publication.

    2. Electrospun Poly(vinyl alcohol) Nanofibres with Biocidal Additives for Application in Filter Media, 2–Antimicrobial Activity, Regeneration, Leaching and Water Stability (pages 618–626)

      Nonjabulo Prudence Gule, Michele de Kwaadsteniet, Thomas Eugene Cloete and Bert Klumperman

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibres containing AquaQure biocide are prepared and tested against various bacteria. The antimicrobial activity is proven via different techniques including an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), fluorescence microscopy and cell cultures. Leaching of the metal ion constituents of AquaQure from the nanofibres appears to be minimal.

    3. Morphology and Thermal Properties of Compatibilized PA12/PP Blends with Boehmite Alumina Nanofiller Inclusions (pages 627–638)

      Elijah Soba Ogunniran, Rotimi Sadiku, Suprakas Sinha Ray and Nyambeni Luruli

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100254

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      The preferred localization of AlO(OH) nanoparticles within a PP-g-MA-compatibilized blend of PA12 and PP depends on the nanoparticle loading. This influences the morphology and thermal properties of the resulting composites strongly. The PP dispersed-phase domain size slightly increases in all composites, as does thermal stability, and thermomechanical properties improve as well.

    4. Tubular Polymer Nanoobjects with a Crosslinked Shell and Inward-Grafted Polymer Brushes (pages 639–644)

      Lei Gao, Wen Zhu, Ke Zhang and Yongming Chen

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100288

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      Robust polymer nanotubes are prepared via surface-initiated ATRP within porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes. By two-step polymerization, these nanotubes have a crosslinked shell and densely grafted inward polymer chains. This structure endows the nanotubes with stability against organic solvents while the inner surface supplies reactivity and functionalities.

    5. Clay Nanotube/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Bone Cement Composites with Sustained Antibiotic Release (pages 645–653)

      Wenbo Wei, Elshad Abdullayev, Anne Hollister, David Mills and Yuri M. Lvov

      Version of Record online: 10 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100309

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      Halloysite/PMMA composite bone cement is developed for joint replacement arthroplasty. Halloysite clay nanotubes loaded with antibiotic gentamicin are doped into the PMMA. These clay nanotubes serve as nanocontainers for 400 h sustained release of the antibiotic. The halloysite/PMMA composite tensile strength and adhesion to bone are significantly improved as compared with the original cement.

    6. Modification of Rheological Properties Under Elongational Flow by Addition of Polymeric Fine Fibers (pages 654–658)

      Masayuki Yamaguchi, Keiko Fukuda, Tadashi Yokohara, Mohd Amran Bin Md Ali and Shogo Nobukawa

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100270

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      A small addition of flexible poly(butylene terephthalate) nanofibers prepared by melt-stretching can enhance the strain hardening behavior in transient elongational viscosity of a poly(propylene) melt, which is one of the most important rheological properties for good processability. This peculiar phenomenon is attributed to frictional forces between the fibers and/or a localized bending of fibers.

    7. Electron-Induced Reactive Processing of Poly(propylene)/Ethylene–Octene Copolymer Blends: A Novel Route to Prepare Thermoplastic Vulcanizates (pages 659–669)

      Ramanujam Rajeshbabu, Uwe Gohs, Kinsuk Naskar, Manas Mondal, Udo Wagenknecht and Gert Heinrich

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100209

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      An electron accelerator that is directly coupled to an internal mixer is employed to induce chemical reactions by high-energy electrons in polymer blends under dynamic conditions in a melt-mixing process. The preparation of poly(propylene) and ethylene–octane copolymer-based thermoplastic vulcanizates through this new reactive process is described.

    8. Nucleation Effects of Nucleobases on the Crystallization Kinetics of Poly(L-lactide) (pages 670–679)

      Pengju Pan, Jinjun Yang, Guorong Shan, Yongzhong Bao, Zhixue Weng and Yoshio Inoue

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100266

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nucleobases, in particular uracil, are efficient, biocompatible, and nontoxic nucleating agents for PLLA bio-plastics. The crystallization half-time decreases and nucleation density of PLLA increases remarkably with the incorporation of uracil. A typical transcrystallite layer is present in the interface of PLLA and uracil.

    9. Multifunctional Luminescent Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Films (pages 680–688)

      Ignazio Roppolo, Massimo Messori, Sandrine Perruchas, Thierry Gacoin, Jean-Pierre Boilot and Marco Sangermano

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent light-emitting hybrid materials are produced by UV curing of acrylic resins containing a silica precursor and photoluminescent [Cu4I4L4] clusters. Transparent organic/inorganic hybrid films are obtained up to 30 wt% TEOS and bright luminescence with a maximum emission at 565 nm. Functional properties such as photoluminescence and scratch resistance are found.

    10. Nano-/Microscale Investigation of Tribological and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy/MWNT Nanocomposites (pages 689–701)

      Majid Reza Ayatollahi, Saeed Doagou-Rad and Shahin Shadlou

      Version of Record online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100271

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      The effects of MWNT content and aspect ratio on the mechanical and tribological properties of epoxy-based nanocomposites are investigated. The reliability of nanoscale indentation and scratch tests is studied. Moreover, improved models are proposed for predicting elastic modulus, hardness, and frictional terms in nanocomposites.

    11. Synthesis of Poly(methyl methacrylate)-Grafted Poly(ethylene-co-1-octene) Copolymers by a “Grafting from” Melt Process (pages 702–710)

      Thierry Badel, Emmanuel Beyou, Veronique Bounor-Legaré, Philippe Chaumont, Philippe Cassagnau, Jean Jacques Flat and Alain Michel

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100305

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      Grafting of PMMA from poly(ethylene-co-1-octene) is performed through the thermolysis of two different peroxy initiators. The role of PMMA-grafted Engage on suppression of droplet coalescence in Engage/PMMA blends is examined by means of TEM. The dimensions of most of the PMMA droplets range from 50 to 500 nm, depending on the PMMA-grafted Engage content in the blends.

    12. Effect of Reinforcement Orientation on the Mechanical Properties of Microfibrillar PP/PET and PET Single-Polymer Composites (pages 711–723)

      Ryan McCardle, Debes Bhattacharyya and Stoyko Fakirov

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100220

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of microfibril orientation on reinforcement is tested and compared to previous work with nanofibrils. Micro-/nanofibrils such as those shown protruding from the matrix show great promise for improving polymer/polymer composites, and even more so for single-polymer composites.

    13. On the Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen-Gel-Based Lattices under Cyclic Loading: Applications for Vascular Tissue Engineering (pages 724–734)

      Matteo Achilli, Sébastien Meghezi and Diego Mantovani

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201100363

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Collagen gel-based lattices with increased strength are obtained by cell-mediated remodeling or by modulating the gelation process. Their elasticity is then improved by crosslinking treatments. SEM and contraction tests show that all the investigated lattices support cell-mediated remodeling, resulting in oriented microstructures.

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