Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 298 Issue 11

November 2013

Volume 298, Issue 11

Pages 1137–1242

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      Macromol. Mater. Eng. 11/2013 (page 1137)

      Hideto Tsuji, Toshiyuki Aratani and Hirofumi Takikawa

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370033

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      Front Cover: Incorporated nano/micro-diamond (NMD) increases the tensile strength and modulus of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) films and accelerates PLLA crystallization. The cover picture shows optical photomicrographs of NMD (center), PLLA/NMD composites with NMD concentrations of 1 (upper left), 3 (upper right), 5 (lower left), and 10 wt-% (lower right). Further details can be found in the article by H. Tsuji,* T. Aratani, and H. Takikawa on page 1149.

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    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 11/2013 (pages 1138–1243)

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370034

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 11/2013 (pages 1139–1142)

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370035

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    1. Heat-Induced Dry Tailoring of Porosity in Polymer Scaffolds (pages 1143–1148)

      Nora Hild, Matteo L. Abaecherli, Dirk Mohn and Wendelin J. Stark

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200327

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      This study delivers the design basis for easy preparation of 3D, flexible, porous, and biodegradable polymer scaffolds through consolidation of non-woven fibre assemblies using dry heat.

    2. Physical Properties, Crystallization, and Thermal/Hydrolytic Degradation of Poly(L-lactide)/Nano/Micro-Diamond Composites (pages 1149–1159)

      Hideto Tsuji, Toshiyuki Aratani and Hirofumi Takikawa

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200397

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      The incorporated nano/micro-diamond (NMD) effectively increased tensile strength and modulus, thermal/hydrolytic degradation resistance of PLLA films and accelerated the crystallization of PLLA homo-crystallites. However, the incorporation of NMD at too high concentration such as 10 wt.-% decreased thermal degradation resistance of PLLA films.

    3. Semiconductor/Polymer Nanocomposites of Acrylates and Nanocrystalline Silicon by Laser-Induced Thermal Polymerization (pages 1160–1165)

      Frank Deubel, Marin Steenackers, José A. Garrido, Martin Stutzmann and Rainer Jordan

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200392

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      A new organic–inorganic nanocomposite is synthesized by laser-induced thermal polymerization of acrylates. Silicon nanocrystals act as the inorganic component as well as hot-spots initiating the thermal crosslinking reaction. The nanocomposite formation is confined to the irradiated areas and patterned composite film can be readily produced with a film thickness of up to 600 µm.

    4. High-Performance Nanocomposites of Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose and Graphene Oxide (pages 1166–1175)

      Rama K. Layek, Aniruddha Kundu and Arun K. Nandi

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200233

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      High-performance nanocomposites of NaCMC with GO are produced by H-bonding between GO and NaCMC. The mechanical properties of the composites are significantly improved. Analysis of Young's modulus with Halpin-Tsai equation suggests that >0.5 wt% GO it obeys unidirectional orientation indicating efficient load transfer with increasing GO concentration.

    5. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) and Poly(propylene carbonate) Blends: an Efficient Method to Finely Adjust Properties of Functional Materials (pages 1176–1183)

      Yves-Marie Corre, Stéphane Bruzaud and Yves Grohens

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200345

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      Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is melt-blended with poly(propylene carbonate)PPC resulting in droplet-matrix morphology. Thermal behavior of PHA is slightly modified by PPC addition revealing phase interactions. The fragile nature of PHA is balanced by PPC, resulting in ductile material with improved impact strength. Barrier properties of PPC is improved with the addition of even small amount of crystalline PHA. PHA/PPC blend is a promising biodegradable blend for applications like food packaging.

    6. Fracture Toughness Enhancement of UV-Cured Epoxy Coatings Containing Al2O3 Nanoparticles (pages 1184–1189)

      Marco Sangermano, Mohamed Naguib and Massimo Messori

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200346

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      Alumina nanoparticles are successively used to enhance the fracture toughness of UV-cured epoxy resins. Incorporation of ceramic nanoparticles causes increasing in surface roughness of fractured surfaces and this could be explained by crack deflection mechanism. Additionally, scratch resistance enhancement for coated films containing alumina nanoparticles is observed.

    7. Improving Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Through Self-nucleation (pages 1190–1200)

      Abhay S. Joijode, KaDesia Hawkins and Alan E. Tonelli

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200398

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      Improvement in PET properties via self-nucleation is demonstrated. PET is modified through a precipitation technique, and used as a homogeneous self-nucleant, because, unlike as-received PET, it is rapidly crystallizable from the melt. Thermal, mechanical, permeability, and other relevant properties of self-nucleated PET films and fibers are much improved. Repeated self-nucleation has also been demonstrated, by re-using self-nucleated PET as a nucleant.

    8. Ultrasound Sonication Effects on Silk Fibroin Protein (pages 1201–1208)

      Dr. Sangram K. Samal, Prof. David L. Kaplan and Prof. Emo Chiellini

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200377

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      Silk solutions are exposed to ultrasound sonication to assess impact on molecular weight, sol–gel transitions and physico-chemical properties. The molecular weight of silk is reduced with sonication and reversible sol–gel transitions forming depending on concentration and sonication time. Conformational changes and morphological features are correlated with silk concentration.

    9. Influence of the Bio-Based Epoxy Prepolymer Structure on Network Properties (pages 1209–1219)

      Marie Chrysanthos, Jocelyne Galy and Jean-Pierre Pascault

      Article first published online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200405

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      New types of bio-based epoxy precursors and networks are studied and compared to a conventional bisphenol A-based prepolymer used to prepare high performance materials. Two epoxy prepolymers are commercial prepolymers derived from sorbitol and cardanol and one is synthesized from isosorbide. The chemical structure of these monomers, reactivity with an amino hardener, effect of the stoichiometry ratio, and network properties are investigated.

    10. Monomers for Adhesive Polymers 12 Synthesis and Free-Radical Homo- and Copolymerization of 2-Ethoxycarbonylallyl 5-(1,2-dithiolane-3-yl)-pentanoate (pages 1220–1231)

      Juraj Pavlinec, Angela Kleinova, Jörg Angermann, Iris Lamparth and Norbert Moszner

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200382

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      The 2-ethoxycarbonylallyl 5-(1,2-dithiolane-3-yl)-pentanoate monomer (AODS) easily polymerizes in the presence of most free-radical initiators with the exception of carboxy-peroxides. Vinyliden along with dithiolane disulfide bonds provide the monomer AODS entry into polymer chains and crosslinks through C–C and S–S bonds. The polymer gels are formed spontaneously in polar solvents or by mixing with carboxy-peroxides. The monomer intra- to inter-molecular disulfide bonds rearrangement is assumed.

    11. Thermoplastic Healing in Epoxy Networks: Exploring Performance and Mechanism of Alternative Healing Agents (pages 1232–1242)

      Russell J. Varley, David A. Craze, Adrian P. Mouritz and Chun H. Wang

      Article first published online: 18 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200394

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      Thermally activated healing in thermoplastic modified epoxy networks is shown to be effective and repeatable for PEGMA, EMAA and EVA thermoplastics for up to 4 healing events. ABS, SEBS and PVB exhibited good initial healing but poor repeatability. Greater efficiency is achieved when additional healing mechanisms apart from polymer flow operate. Matrix adhesion through chemical interactions and elastomeric behaviour are critical these alternative responses.

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