Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 298 Issue 4

April 2013

Volume 298, Issue 4

Pages 373–461

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      Macromol. Mater. Eng. 4/2013 (page 373)

      Jianmin Huang, Wen-Jun Wang, Bo-Geng Li and Shiping Zhu

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370010

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      Cover: An effective approach is reported for designing and tailoring diffusion-controlled systems through a diffusivity control for targeted release rate profiles. The diffusivity control is achieved via tailoring crosslink densities in polymer networks. Optimized diffusivity profiles for targeted release are estimated from Fick's law and used for constructing the polymer networks. Further details can be found in the article by J. Huang, W.-J. Wang,* B.-G. Li, and S. Zhu* on page 391.

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    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 4/2013 (pages 374–463)

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370011

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Macromol. Mater. Eng. 4/2013 (pages 375–378)

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370012

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    1. Living Radical Polymerization and Molecular Imprinting: Improving Polymer Morphology in Imprinted Polymers (pages 379–390)

      Vishal D. Salian and Mark E. Byrne

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200191

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      The improved network architecture of the polymers created using LRP has great potential for the creation of better molecularly imprinted polymers which have traditionally been plagued by heterogeneity in network morphology and binding site affinities. Recent successes in the creation of molecularly imprinted polymer networks, gels, and nanoparticles using LRP techniques are discussed.

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    1. Design and Synthesis of Poly(butyl acrylate) Networks through RAFT Polymerization with Crosslinking for Controlled-Release Applications (pages 391–399)

      Jianmin Huang, Wen-Jun Wang, Bo-Geng Li and Shiping Zhu

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An effective approach is described for designing and tailoring diffusion-controlled systems through diffusivity control for targeted release rate profiles. The diffusion-controlled system consists of poly(butyl acrylate) networks with precisely controlled crosslink densities for the desired diffusivity profile.

    2. Percolated Network Structure Formation and Rheological Properties in Nylon 6/Clay Nanocomposites (pages 400–411)

      Chihiro Mizuno, Baiju John and Masami Okamoto

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200065

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      The volume-spanning montmorillonite network leads to a very high flow activation energy, resulting in a pseudo-solid like response in the molten state in N6CNs. The incorporation of Si(OH)4 into the nylon 6/Si(OH)4 system induces a reduction of the total energy accompanied with decreasing of the enthalpy due to the negative potential energy of Si(OH)4, as revealed by NVT-MD simulations.

    3. Green Composites From Soy-Based Biopolyurethane With Microcrystalline Cellulose (pages 412–418)

      Xiaogang Luo, Amar Mohanty and Manju Misra

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200030

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      Soy oil-based biopolyurethane (left) is chosen as the polymer matrix due to its wide applications. Transparent composite sheets filled with up to 1 wt% microcrystalline cellulose are prepared by compression molding. The optical transmittance, SEM, density, FTIR, mechanical (right) and thermal properties of the composites are studied.

    4. Pyridine-Modified Polymer as a Non-Covalent Compatibilizer for Multi-Walled CNT/Poly[ethylene-co-(methacrylic acid)] Composites Fabricated by Direct Melt Mixing (pages 419–428)

      Eyal Cohen, Amos Ophir, Shmuel Kenig, Carol Barry and Joey Mead

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200078

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      Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite dispersion can be significantly improved by introducing a polymeric compatibilizer composed of chemical groups capable of forming π–π interactions with the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy indicates increased adhesion caused by π-interactions between the CNTs and the synthesized compatibilizer, which is based on the reaction between acidic polymer and aminopyridine.

    5. Synthesis and Characterization of Reinforced Poly(ethylene glycol)/Chitosan Hydrogel as Wound Dressing Materials (pages 429–438)

      Szu-Hsien Chen, Ching-Ting Tsao, Chih-Hao Chang, Yi-Ting Lai, Ming-Fung Wu, Zheng-Wei Liu, Ching-Nan Chuang, Hung-Chia Chou, Chih-Kuang Wang and Kuo-Haung Hsieh

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200054

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      Structurally stable hydrogels composed of chitosan and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are synthesized. The results indicate that increased amounts of PEG cause the swelling ratio and in vitro degradation to increase; the tensile moduli of dry-reinforced RPC hydrogels show the opposite trend. WVTR experiments indicate that the PEG on RPC hydrogels may provide adequate moisture to reduce wound dehydration.

    6. The Importance of Crosslinking and Glass Transition Temperature for the Mechanical Strength of Nanofibers Obtained by Green Electrospinning (pages 439–446)

      Elisabeth Giebel, Julia Getze, Thorsten Röcker and Andreas Greiner

      Version of Record online: 6 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200080

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      Aqueous dispersions of crosslinked particles are prepared by emulsion polymerization and are electrospun together with poly(vinyl alcohol). Unreacted allyl groups are crosslinked by UV irradiation to stabilize the fibers further. The influence of crosslinking state and glass transition temperature on the fiber structure and mechanical stability is determined.

    7. Tunable Thermo-Responsive Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) Cellulose Nanofibers: Synthesis, Characterization, and Fabrication (pages 447–453)

      Martial Webster, Jianjun Miao, Brandon Lynch, Da'Sean Green, Reginald Jones-Sawyer, Robert J. Linhardt and Juana Mendenhall

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200081

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      Temperature-responsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL( homopolymers with different functionalities are prepared via free-radical polymerization. Non-woven nanofibers or microbelts are electrospun from PVCL ethanol solution.

    8. Monomers for Adhesive Polymers, 9–Synthesis, Radical Photopolymerization, and Properties of (Meth)acrylamido Dihydrogen Phosphates (pages 454–461)

      Norbert Moszner, Jörg Angermann, Urs Fischer and Thorsten Bock

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200056

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      5-Methacrylamidopentyl, 10-(N-methylacrylamido)decyl, and 11-(N-methylacrylamido)undecyl dihydrogenphosphate are synthesized. The monomers are radically photopolymerizable, show improved hydrolytic stability and a low cytotoxicity, and can etch enamel and dentin. Therefore, they may be used as adhesive monomers in single-bottle self-etching enamel-dentin adhesives.

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