Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 298 Issue 5

Special Issue: Functional Nanofibers

May 2013

Volume 298, Issue 5

Pages 465–596

Issue edited by: Il-Doo Kim

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
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      Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2013 (page 465)

      Seung-Hoon Choi, Seon-Jin Choi, Byoung Koun Min, Woon Young Lee, Jin Seong Park and Il-Doo Kim

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370013

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      Cover: P-type SrTi0.65Fe0.35O3-δ nanofibers and nanobelts are synthesized by controlling the viscosity and solvent evaporation rate during electrospinning. The semiconducting SrTi0.65Fe0.35O3-δ fiber network shows superior oxygen-sensing properties with a fast response speed of 2.1 s and a high gas response (Roxygen/Rnitrogen = 4.08 at 20% O2) due to high surface-to-volume ratio and effective gas diffusion through the porous nanofiber network. Further details can be found in the article by S.-H. Choi, S.-J. Choi, B. K. Min, W. Y. Lee, J. S. Park, and I.-D. Kim* on page 521.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2013 (page 600)

      Himchan Cho, Sung-Yong Min and Tae-Woo Lee

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370017

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      Back Cover: The electronic and photonic applications of electrospun organic nanofibers are reported, with a brief introduction about the principles, advantages, and conditions of electrospinning, specifically focusing on organic light-emitting diodes, organic photovoltaics, organic field-effect transistors, lasers, and waveguides. The representative studies for each field are reviewed with respect to materials and performance. Further details can be found in the article by H. Cho, S.-Y. Min, and T.-W. Lee* on page 475.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2013 (pages 466–599)

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370014

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2013 (pages 467–472)

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370015

  5. Essay

    1. Top of page
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    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
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  6. Reviews

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    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
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    1. Electrospun Organic Nanofiber Electronics and Photonics (pages 475–486)

      Himchan Cho, Sung-Yong Min and Tae-Woo Lee

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200364

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      In this Review, the electronic and photonic applications of organic nanofibers, fabricated by electrospinning, are discussed, specifically focusing on organic light-emitting diodes, organic photovoltaics, organic field-effect transistors, lasers, and waveguides. The representative studies for each field are reviewed with respect to material and performance.

    2. Light-Emitting Electrospun Nanofibers for Nanophotonics and Optoelectronics (pages 487–503)

      Andrea Camposeo, Luana Persano and Dario Pisignano

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200277

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      Light-emitting nanofibers are novel materials able to generate, guide, and detect light, with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The electrospinning method is used strategically in this respect, allowing fine control of the nanostructure shape and size and high throughput. This paper provides an overview of the properties of electrospun light-emitting nanofibers and of their potential applications.

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      Industrial Upscaling of Electrospinning and Applications of Polymer Nanofibers: A Review (pages 504–520)

      Luana Persano, Andrea Camposeo, Cagri Tekmen and Dario Pisignano

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200290

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      Environment, energy, and biotechnology are some of the industrial fields where the potentialities of electrospun nanofibers are largely demonstrated. A focus on technological approaches developed by research and on their weakness and strong points is provided. The requirements of industrial production with respect to electrospinning throughput, accuracy, and nanofiber functionality are discussed, together with challenges from the market.

  7. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Facile Synthesis of p-type Perovskite SrTi0.65Fe0.35O3–δ Nanofibers Prepared by Electrospinning and Their Oxygen-Sensing Properties (pages 521–527)

      Seung-Hoon Choi, Seon-Jin Choi, Byoung Koun Min, Woon Young Lee, Jin Seong Park and Il-Doo Kim

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200375

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      Quaternary p-type SrTi0.65Fe0.35O3– δ (STFO) nanofibers with polycrystalline structure are synthesized via electrospinning and used as high-sensitivity oxygen-sensing layers.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2013

      Donald T. Haynie, Dhan B. Khadka, Michael C. Cross, Alina Gitnik and Nicole K. Le

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201370016

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      Frontispiece: The development of polypeptide-based materials is potentially transformative for the life sciences, medicine, and other areas. Here, a random copolymer of glutamic acid and tyrosine is adopted as a model polymer for study of the mechanisms of stability of electrospun fibers. Experiments show that fiber stability is crucially dependent on the extent of side chain ionization, even after polymer crosslinking. Further details can be found in the article by D. T. Haynie,* D. B. Khadka, M. C. Cross, A. Gitnik, and N. K. Le on page 529.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Essay
    7. Reviews
    8. Communication
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Mechanisms of Stability of Fibers Electrospun from Peptides with Ionized Side Chains (pages 529–540)

      Donald T. Haynie, Dhan B. Khadka, Michael C. Cross, Alina Gitnik and Nicole K. Le

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200331

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      Non-woven electrospun fiber mats made of polypeptides are increasingly considered attractive for basic research and technology development in the life sciences, medicine, and other areas. Covalent crosslinks (orange) may be formed between polymers (blue). Here, we show that crosslinked fiber stability in an aqueous medium is crucially dependent on the extent of side chain ionization, which varies with pH.

    2. Flexible Pressure Sensor Based on a Poly(VDF-TrFE) Nanofiber Web (pages 541–546)

      Guangyi Ren, Fanyi Cai, Baozhang Li, Jianming Zheng and Chunye Xu

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200218

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      A high-performance flexible mechanical sensor made from piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) polymer nanofibers is described that shows a high sensitivity up to 60.5 mV · N−1. This sensitivity is comparable to that of pure PVDF film. The sensor responds synchronously to an external dynamic force up to 20 Hz and may be used in human-related devices for health monitoring and medical treatment.

    3. Silver-Polydopamine Hybrid Coatings of Electrospun Poly(vinyl alcohol) Nanofibers (pages 547–554)

      Ho Yeon Son, Ji Hyun Ryu, Haeshin Lee and Yoon Sung Nam

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200231

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      Mussel-inspired silver coatings of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers are achieved via the oxidative polymerization of dopamine that mediates the reduction and deposition of silver ions. The electrospun PVA nanofibers serve as a template for spontaneous silver coating without additional reducing agents. This results in a stable and porous mesh structure in aqueous solution.

    4. Bio-inspired Immobilization of Cell-Adhesive Ligands on Electrospun Nanofibrous Patches for Cell Delivery (pages 555–564)

      Young Min Shin, Indong Jun, Youn-Mook Lim, Taiyoun Rhim and Heungsoo Shin

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200217

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      Electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) fibers functionalized with a cell-adhesive peptide inspired by polydopamine coating are presented. The successful surface coating modulates adhesion, proliferation, and formation of multi-nucleated myotubes of myoblasts, which can be a useful tool as a novel cardiac patch to deliver therapeutic cell sources.

    5. Fabrication of Silk Fibroin/P(LLA-CL) Aligned Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Nerve Tissue Engineering (pages 565–574)

      Kuihua Zhang, Wu Jinglei, Chen Huang and Xiumei Mo

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200038

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      Aligned 25:75 wt% SF/P(LLA-CL) nanofibrous scaffolds are fabricated via electrospinning. Schwann cell viability studies indicate that aligned scaffolds significantly promote cell growth and that the direction of SCs elongation is parallel to the direction of fibers for aligned scaffolds.

    6. Ultrasonic Breaking of Fibers and Microparticles into Mesoporous Particles with High Loading of Magnetic Nanoparticles (pages 575–582)

      Dong Choon Hyun, Eunmin Jo, Choo Jin Park, Min-Cheol Lim, Hyun-Jong Paik, Eun Chul Cho, Young-Rok Kim and Unyong Jeong

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200223

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      Breaking mesoporous fibers and particles. Polymer composite particles containing large amounts of nanoparticles are produced by ultrasonic-breaking of porous, electrospun fibers and microparticles.

    7. Morphology and Core Continuity of Liquid-Crystal-Functionalized, Coaxially Electrospun Fiber Mats Tuned via the Polymer Sheath Solution (pages 583–589)

      Giusy Scalia, Eva Enz, Oronzo Calò, Dae Kyom Kim, Minsik Hwang, Jong Hwan Lee and Jan P. F. Lagerwall

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200361

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      Liquid-crystal-functionalized core–sheath fibers produced by coaxial electrospinning can exhibit novel optical properties and strong response function. These fibers could be used in wearable sensors, but a careful matching between core and sheath fluids is required for ensuring optimum fiber morphology, strength, and a continuous core.

    8. Application of Electrospun Gas Diffusion Nanofibre-membranes in the Determination of Dissolved Carbon Dioxide (pages 590–596)

      Yen B. Truong, Yukie O'Bryan, Ian D. McKelvie, Ilias L. Kyratzis and William Humphries

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200329

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      Fabrication of gas-diffusion polymer membranes via electrospinning have been demonstrated and successfully used in a flow injection analysis system. The heat pressed polystyrene electrospun membrane gives the best performance for diffusion of carbon dioxide from water samples. Hydrophobicity, thickness and pore size distribution are found to be important properties of electrospun membranes for them to function as gas-diffusion membranes.

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