Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 299 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 299, Issue 1

Pages 1–124

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2014 (page 1)

      Anna Nuzzo, Serena Coiai, Sabrina C. Carroccio, Nadka Tz. Dintcheva, Cristian Gambarotti and Giovanni Filippone

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201470001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: Small amounts of organoclay are added to a PLA/PA11 blend at 70% wt. of PLA to turn the drop-matrix morphology into a co-continuous one. In such a way, a remarkable improvement of the high-temperature creep resistance is achieved owing to the clay-rich PA11 framework, which interpenetrates the PLA and contributes to bear stresses up to 160 °C. Further details can be found in the article by A. Nuzzo, S. Coiai, S. C. Carroccio, N. T. Dintcheva, C. Gambarotti, and G. Filippone on page 31.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: Macromol. Mater. Eng. 1/2014 (page 2)

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201470002

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Polymeric Materials, Preferably Spun (pages 7–8)

      Stefan Spiegel

      Version of Record online: 8 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300056

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Progress Report on Natural Fiber Reinforced Composites (pages 9–26)

      Omar Faruk, Andrzej K. Bledzki, Hans-Peter Fink and Mohini Sain

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent economic and ecological issues have encouraged the development of new materials with less environmental impact, produced from renewable resources with a high level of biodegradability. Therefore, all over the world, there is rising acceptance in materials demonstrating efficient use of renewable resources. Natural fiber reinforced bio-based polymers can replace synthetic composites with cost equivalence and better properties. This Review focuses on progress made on natural fiber reinforced composites in recent years.

  6. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Polysulfone Membranes Demonstrating Asymmetric Diode-like Water Permeability and Their Applications (pages 27–30)

      Edward Bormashenko, Sagi Balter, Alexander Malkin and Doron Aurbach

      Version of Record online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200421

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Asymmetric polysulfone membranes strongly hydrophobic from one side and hydrophilic from the other side are reported. The membranes demonstrate diode-like water permeability. The membranes are obtained by the breath figures self-assembly. Hydrophilicity is achieved by exposure of one side of the membrane to UV light. Hydrophobicity of the non-treated side of membranes is strengthened by the Cassie–Baxter wetting.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Review
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Heat-Resistant Fully Bio-Based Nanocomposite Blends Based on Poly(lactic acid) (pages 31–40)

      Anna Nuzzo, Serena Coiai, Sabrina C. Carroccio, Nadka Tz. Dintcheva, Cristian Gambarotti and Giovanni Filippone

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Combining a judicial selection of the blend constituents and a clever manipulation of the blend microstructure through the addition of nanoparticles, an “engineered” fully bio-based nanocomposite blend with PLA as the dominant component is obtained that is able to retain its structural integrity up to ≈160 °C.

    2. Ethylene-vinyl Acetate Thermoplastic Copolymers Filled with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes: Effect of Hydrothermal Ageing on Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties (pages 41–50)

      Olesja Starkova, Samuel T. Buschhorn, Luis Antônio Sanchez de Almeida Prado, Petra Pötschke, Matthias Edelmann and Karl Schulte

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200422

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      Addition of MWCNTs into EVA copolymers significantly improves their elastic modulus, stress at failure, and creep resistance. The effect of hydrothermal ageing on tensile, thermal, and electrical properties of the neat copolymers and their nanocomposites is reported.

    3. Improving Melt Flow of Polyoxymethylene (“High-Speed POM”): Additive Design, Melt Rheology, and In Situ Composition Gradient Formation (pages 51–64)

      Karlheinz Gamp, Yi Thomann, Christian Friedrich, André Hebel, Kirsten Markgraf, Hanno Hückstädt, Klaus Kurz and Rolf Mülhaupt

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200459

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      Variation of isocyanurate substitution patterns and functionalities is the key to novel additives for “high-speed POM”. In injection molding only 3 wt% isocyanurate urethane (I3O) are sufficient for increasing the POM melt flow path by 60%. Such additives can reduce processing temperature by 40 K. Lubrication mechanisms and the role of in situ composition gradient formation, resulting from additive surface migration, are studied.

    4. Rubber-Like Materials Prepared from Copolymerization of Tannin Fatty Acid Conjugates and Vegetable Oils (pages 65–74)

      Chunhua Luo, Warren J. Grigsby, Neil R. Edmonds and Jafar Al-Hakkak

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300039

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      Oxidation copolymerization of tannin oleate esters and vegetable oils provides a route to novel materials comprising relatively rigid and soft domains. These rubber-like materials are considered totally bio-based exhibiting a range of mechanical properties with thermal stability up to 200 °C.

    5. Treating Bloodmeal with Peracetic Acid to Produce a Bioplastic Feedstock (pages 75–84)

      Aaron Low, Casparus Johannes Reinhard Verbeek and Mark Christopher Lay

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200447

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      A novel and efficient method is described to remove the color and smell from bloodmeal (meat processing industry waste product) using peracetic acid. This method does not significantly reduce the protein molecular mass and the treated powder is suitable for use in bioplastic production, turning this low-value industry waste product into a useful material.

    6. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Bloodmeal-Based Thermoplastics Plasticized with Tri(ethylene glycol) (pages 85–95)

      James M. Bier, Casparus J. R. Verbeek and Mark C. Lay

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200460

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      Tri(ethylene glycol) is shown to successfully plasticize bloodmeal-based thermoplastics, remaining in the plastic after conditioning, decreasing the glass transition temperature and increasing the strain at break and toughness. Although plasticized, H-bonding still dominates protein/protein interactions.

    7. Recycling and Thermomechanical Degradation of LDPE/Modified Clay Nanocomposites (pages 96–103)

      Francesco Paolo La Mantia, Maria Chiara Mistretta and Marco Morreale

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200449

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      The importance of nanocomposites is greatly increasing, and thus the recyclability of these materials is leading to serious environmental concerns. Here, the complex thermomechanical degradation behavior of LDPE/Cloisite 15A systems is studied in detail, and the changes of their rheological, mechanical, and morphological properties are analyzed.

    8. PLA/Halloysite Nanocomposite Films: Water Vapor Barrier Properties and Specific Key Characteristics (pages 104–115)

      Giuliana Gorrasi, Roberto Pantani, Marius Murariu and Philippe Dubois

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200424

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      The potential of halloysite nanotubes for fine-tuning the barrier properties of PLA films designed for packaging applications is explored. PLA nanocomposites with varying HNT loadings are produced by melt-mixing and shaped as films. The morphology, thermal and barrier properties to water vapor of nanocomposite films are examined and compared to those of neat PLA.

    9. Wheat-Gluten-Based Adhesives for Particle Boards: Effect of Crosslinking Agents (pages 116–124)

      Sara Khosravi, Farideh Khabbaz, Petra Nordqvist and Mats Johansson

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300045

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The potential of crosslinked wheat-gluten-based adhesives for particle boards is demonstrated. The effect of parameters such as crosslinking type and pH is described. A formaldehyde-free particle board adhesive is thus obtained.

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