Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 299 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 299, Issue 2

Pages 129–256

  1. Cover Picture

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      Cover Picture: Macromol. Mater. Eng. 2/2014 (page 129)

      Mohammed Muntakim Anwar, Tanveer Saleh, John D. W. Madden and Kenichi Takahata

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201470004

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      Cover:. Polypyrrole, a promising conducting polymer, can be micropatterned through high-frequency pulses of extremely miniaturized electrical discharge generated on it. Fine micromachining with a controlled depth of 7.5μm and an average surface roughness of 70 nm is demonstrated. The process is found to cause no major alteration in the material composition. Fabrication of polypyrrole electrodes/actuators on medical catheters is also demonstrated.

  2. Masthead

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  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
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    7. Full Paper
    8. Full Papers
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  4. Communications

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    1. Core/Shell Polymer Particles by Semibatch Combined Suspension/Emulsion Polymerizations for Enzyme Immobilization (pages 135–143)

      Marina D. Besteti, Aline G. Cunha, Denise M. G. Freire and José Carlos Pinto

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300023

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      Suspension–emulsion polymerizations are performed for production of supports for immobilization of lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB), using styrene, methyl methacrylate and cardanol as monomers. The produced particles can be used successfully for immobilization of CALB, leading to immobilization efficiencies and enzyme activities that are better than the ones obtained with Accurel MP 1000.

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    1. Forming Crystalline Polymer-Nano Interphase Structures for High-Modulus and High-Tensile/Strength Composite Fibers (pages 144–153)

      Jiangsha Meng, Yiying Zhang, Kenan Song and Marilyn L. Minus

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300025

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      Single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to template a new PVA crystalline interphase structure in shear-flow gel/spun composite fibers. The presence of the highly crystalline interphase regions provides improved contact between PVA chains and SWNT and a better stress transfer. The fibers show superior properties with tensile strength, modulus, and toughness of 4.9 GPa, 128 GPa, and 202 J · g−1, respectively.

    2. Correlation Between Reactive Modification Conditions and Degree of Long-Chain Branching in Chemically Modified Linear Low Density Polyethylene Using Response Surface Experimental Design (pages 154–164)

      Mahdi Golriz, Hossein Ali Khonakdar, Jalil Morshedian, Hossein Abedini, Seyed Hassan Jafari, Albena Lederer and Udo Wagenknecht

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300005

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      The application of a response surface experimental design for the quantitative estimation of the influence of processing parameters on the degree of long-chain branching induced on linear low density polyethylene; during peroxide modification is described. The effects of temperature, peroxide concentration, and residence time are studied.

    3. Evolution of Poly(propylene) Morphology in the Rubbery State under Uniaxial Strain (pages 165–177)

      Anthony Thévenon and René Fulchiron

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300043

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      The crystalline orientation during extensional measurements of a semi-crystalline polymer is shown to be more effective at lower temperatures. This is due to a thinner fragmentation of the initial crystals followed by a more significant fibrillar structure formation. A lower strain rate is also more efficient.

    4. Biocomposites From Switchgrass and Lignin Hybrid and Poly(butylene succinate) Bioplastic: Studies on Reactive Compatibilization and Performance Evaluation (pages 178–189)

      Saswata Sahoo, Manjusri Misra and Amar K. Mohanty

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300038

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      High volume production of lignin raises concerns regarding its value-added use. Lignin is a brittle material and reduces impact strength of a polymer. Hybrid filler (50 wt%) based lignin composites with better material properties can be prepared from poly(butylene succinate). Reactive compatibilization chemistry is highly effective in improving the properties of composites. Impact strength comparable with injection grade poly(butylene succinate) can be achieved for the composites.

    5. Electroresponsive Nanoporous Membranes by Coating Anodized Alumina with Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) and Polypyrrole (pages 190–197)

      Alexis E. Abelow, Kristin M. Persson, Edwin W. H. Jager, Magnus Berggren and Ilya Zharov

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201200456

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      Electrically responsive nanoporous membranes are prepared by coating their surface with doped electroactive polymers poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophone) and polypyrrole. The molecular flux through the membranes is higher in the oxidized state compared to the reduced state due to swelling/deswelling of the polymers confined inside the nanopores.

    6. Micropatterning Polypyrrole Conducting Polymer by Pulsed Electrical Discharge (pages 198–207)

      Mohammed Muntakim Anwar, Tanveer Saleh, John D. W. Madden and Kenichi Takahata

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polypyrrole, a promising conducting polymer, can be micropatterned through high-frequency pulses of extremely miniaturized electrical discharge generated on it. Fine micromachining with a controlled depth of 7.5 μm and an average surface roughness of 70 nm is demonstrated. The process is found to cause no major alteration in material composition. Fabrication of polypyrrole electrodes/actuators on medical catheters is also demonstrated.

    7. Metal Triflates as Catalytic Curing Agents in Self-Healing Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials (pages 208–218)

      Tim S. Coope, Duncan F. Wass, Richard S. Trask and Ian P. Bond

      Version of Record online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300026

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      An in-house developed Lewis acid-catalysed self-healing system, comprised of solid-phase metal triflate catalysts and diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin, is employed to achieve full fracture toughness recovery of the fibre reinforced polymer composite material. Mechanical testing of the healed material clearly shows a ductile failure, a failure mechanism not typically associated with inherently brittle materials such as epoxy.

    8. Melt Spinning of Biodegradable Nanofibrillary Structures from Poly(lactic acid) and Poly(vinyl alcohol) Blends (pages 219–227)

      Nguyen Hoai An Tran, Harald Brünig, Claudia Hinüber and Gert Heinrich

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300125

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      Conventional melt spinning of thermoplastic polymer fibers is used to melt blend two polymers (PLA and PVA) in a twin screw extruder and further spun as textile filaments with a diameter of 164 μm. The filament yarns are then woven to produce 3D textile structures and subjected to extraction in water to remove the PVA matrix. After removal of the PVA component, a 3D PLA nanofibrillar network (with nanofibrils measuring ca. 60 nm in diameter) is obtained.

    9. A Latex-Based Route to Disperse Carbon Nanotubes in Poly(2,6-Dimethyl-1,4-Phenylene Ether)/Polystyrene Blends (pages 228–236)

      Nadia Grossiord, Bart A. J. Noordover, Hans E. Miltner, Theo Hoeks, Virginie Alexandre, Joachim Loos, Bruno van Mele, Jan Meuldijk and Cor E. Koning

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300105

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      Electrically conductive nanocomposites consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) well dispersed in a poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether)/polystyrene (PPE/PS) polymer blend are prepared in two different ways, based on the so-called latex technology. In the first route, PPE/PS blend latexes are directly used, whereas in the second route, CNT/PS masterbatches are prepared by latex technology and compounded with PS/PPE blend pellets by extrusion.

  6. Full Paper

    1. Top of page
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    1. Biomimetic Micro-Patterning of Epoxy Coatings for Enhanced Surface Hydrophobicity and Low Friction (pages 237–247)

      Brendan McDonald, Hamed Shahsavan and Boxin Zhao

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300112

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      Biologically inspired micro-structures are fabricated on conventional epoxy coatings with a two-stage pattern transfer process allowing for a large scale application of biomimetic features. The biomimetic micro-pillars make epoxy coatings hydrophobic while also decreasing friction. This robust and tunable surface modification opens up the traditional field of protective coatings to new and innovative opportunities.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
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    1. Enzyme Modification of Grain By-products and Their Biocomposites: Characterization, Mechanical and Thermal Properties (pages 248–256)

      Abdullah Al Mamun and Andrzej Korneliusz Bledzki

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300140

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      Grain by-products are waste products that accumulate during grain processing. They are inexpensive, sustainable and abundant in nature. A green enzymatic method is used for the surface modification of grain by-products. PLA composites are produced with the resulting modified grain by-products. All green bio-composites offer a smart method for waste management and could be used in many industrial applications as an alternative to conventional synthetic polymer-fibre composites.

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