Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 299 Issue 5

May 2014

Volume 299, Issue 5

Pages 517–638

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      Cover Picture: Macromol. Mater. Eng. 5/2014 (page 517)

      Solmaz Hajizadeh, Bo Mattiasson and Harald Kirsebom

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201470013

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      Cover: Introducing adsorbents on pre-made macroporous hydrogel has been used to form a composite network for separation purposes. In this method, adsorbents are pumped through the gel and immobilized via covalent interactions on the pre-made gels. Efficient mass transfer and good flow-through properties can be expected from the monoliths, and immobilizing adsorbents on the surface of the network increases the total binding capacity towards both small and large target molecules. Further details can be found in the article by Solmaz Hajizadeh,* Bo Mattiasson, and Harald Kirsebom on page 631.

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  4. Review

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    1. Thermal Transitions and Structural Relaxations in Protein-Based Thermoplastics (pages 524–539)

      James M. Bier, Casparus J. R. Verbeek and Mark C. Lay

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300248

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      Protein-based thermoplastics resemble semi-crystalline polymers. Although denaturing of a protein's native structure is often called melting, this does not imply complete unfolding, as true melting would. Some secondary structures remain after denaturing, stay intact above the Tg and affect transitions in the amorphous phase.

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    1. Preparation and Characterization of Interconnected, Kraft Lignin-Based Carbon Fibrous Materials by Electrospinning (pages 540–551)

      Ian Dallmeyer, Li Ting Lin, Yingjie Li, Frank Ko and John F. Kadla

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300148

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      Inter-connected carbon sub-µm fibrous materials are prepared from Kraft lignin. Blending of lignin fractions with different thermal mobility's results in electrospun nonwovens with different morphologies. Electrospun fibers containing high thermal mobility lignin tend to soften and bond at their intersections leading to carbonized materials with enhanced mechanical properties and electrical conductivity.

    2. Renewable-Resource-Based Green Blends from Poly(furfuryl alcohol) Bioresin and Lignin (pages 552–559)

      Harekrishna Deka, Amar Mohanty and Manjusri Misra

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300221

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      It is demonstrated how value-added products can be produced from furfuryl alcohol and lignin to enhance the biomass conversion economy. Poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) is obtained from pentosan-rich biomass whereas lignin is a by-product of pulp and paper, and bioethanol industries.

    3. Mechanical Performance and Transparency of Nanocellulose Reinforced Polymer Nanocomposites (pages 560–568)

      Sami Boufi, Hamid Kaddami and Alain Dufresne

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300232

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      Cellulosic nanoparticles are prepared from alfa and date palm tree. Nanocomposites are processed from these materials using acrylic as the matrix. Higher aspect ratio of the nanoparticles results in higher reinforcing capability. However, surprisingly the transparency of the films decreases for a given nanofiller content when the diameter of the nanoparticle decreases.

    4. Effect of Non-Rubber Components of NR on the Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Localization in SBR/NR Blends (pages 569–582)

      Hai Hong Le, Meenali Parsekar, Sybill Ilisch, Sven Henning, Amit Das, Klaus-Werner Stöckelhuber, Mario Beiner, Chi Anh Ho, Rameshwar Adhikari, Sven Wießner, Gert Heinrich and Hans-Joachim Radusch

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300254

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      The phase-specific localization of CNTs in SBR/NR blends is different from that in SBR/IR blends. Most CNTs are found to be localized in the SBR matrix of SBR/IR blends due to the better affinity of CNTs to SBR than to IR. In contrast, the presence of phospholipids in NR causes a significantly high CNT loading localized in the NR phase of SBR/NR blends.

    5. Tunable and Durable Toughening of Polylactide Materials Via Reactive Extrusion (pages 583–595)

      Georgio Kfoury, Fatima Hassouna, Jean-Marie Raquez, Valérie Toniazzo, David Ruch and Philippe Dubois

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300265

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      In situ grafting of methacryl- and acryl-functionalized PEG co-monomers (MAPEG and AcrylPEG) onto PLA via reactive extrusion in the presence of peroxide is studied. As compared to conventional plasticization, the reactive grafting of plasticizers allows improving the impact resistance of the materials while conserving the plasticized blend flexibility.

    6. Concurrent Enhancement of Multiple Properties in Reactively Processed Nanocomposites of Polylactide/Poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] Blend and Organoclay (pages 596–608)

      Vincent Ojijo, Suprakas Sinha Ray and Rotimi Sadiku

      Version of Record online: 15 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300306

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      This work demonstrates the possibility of enhancing the thermal stability, flammability, toughness, and barrier properties of biodegradable polylactide in a one-stage process through reactive blending with biodegradable poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] in the presence of nanoclays.

    7. Influence of Processing Parameters During Small-Scale Batch Melt Mixing on the Dispersion of MWCNTs in a Poly(propylene) Matrix (pages 609–621)

      Beatriz Mayoral, Jose Lopes and Tony McNally

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300158

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      MWCNT dispersion and distribution in PP, electrical, and rheological percolation are governed by the process parameters employed during melt mixing in a small-scale batch mixer.

    8. Continuous Blending Approach in the Manufacture of Epoxidized Soybean-Plasticized Poly(lactic acid) Sheets and Films (pages 622–630)

      Shalini Vijayarajan, Susan E. M. Selke and Laurent M. Matuana

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300226

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      A single-step processing system is developed for a continuous and accurate incorporation of plasticizer into a molten PLA matrix during sheet/film manufacturing. The impact strength and the ductility of plasticized sheets produced using this system significantly increased with the epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) content, indicative of the toughening capacity of ESO as a plasticizer.

    9. Flow-Through-Mediated Surface Immobilization of Sub-Micrometre Particles in Monolithic Cryogels (pages 631–638)

      Solmaz Hajizadeh, Bo Mattiasson and Harald Kirsebom

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300358

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      Immobilizing of microparticles via a flow-through configuration on premade polymeric matrices is investigated in this study for increasing the binding capacity properties of the particles. This new approach will provide higher capacity of the adsorbents towards small and large molecules. The number of particles can be controlled by adjusting the functional groups on the polymeric network and time of circulation.

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