Macromolecular Materials and Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 299 Issue 8

August 2014

Volume 299, Issue 8

Pages 901–1020

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Macromol. Mater. Eng. 8/2014 (page 901)

      Javier G. Fernandez and Donald E. Ingber

      Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201470022

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      Cover: A chess piece made of a chitosan-based composite (queen) behind a commercial chess piece (king). The study on the correlation between molecular arrangement and mechanical characteristics of chitinous materials leads to use of the second most abundant biopolymer on earth for manufacture of several large-scale 3D objects and composites. Further details can be found in the article by J. G. Fernandez and D. E. Ingber* on page 932.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Functional Polymer Nanocomposites with Graphene: A Review (pages 906–931)

      Vikas Mittal

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300394

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      Graphene has emerged as a functional reinforcing filler for generating polymer nanocomposites. The possibilities to tune interfacial interactions between graphene and polymers though graphene surface functionalization have resulted in the generation of large number of nanocomposite systems using a wide variety of polymers. The figure shows an example of one such nanocomposites of graphene oxide with polyethylene.

  5. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Manufacturing of Large-Scale Functional Objects Using Biodegradable Chitosan Bioplastic (pages 932–938)

      Javier G. Fernandez and Donald E. Ingber

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300426

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Large-scale functional components made of chitosan are fabricated. The mechanical properties of chitosan depend on the processing method, and their study result in new manufacturing methods to produce large objects of chitosan with mechanical properties similar to common synthetic polymers. These chitosan materials are completely recyclable, compostable, and their breakdown products support plant growth.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Unique Cold-Crystallization Behavior and Kinetics of Biodegradable Poly[(butylene succinate)-co adipate] Nanocomposites: A High Speed Differential Scanning Calorimetry Study (pages 939–952)

      Jayita Bandyopadhyay, Shaeel A. Al-Thabaiti, Suprakas Sinha Ray, Sulaiman Nassir Basahel and Mohamed Mokhtar

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300359

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      A high-speed differential scanning calorimeter is used to study the cold-crystallization behavior and kinetics of neat poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] and its clay-containing nanocomposites. The results show that the presence of well-dispersed intercalated silicate layers explains the observed unusual cold-crystallization behavior and the retarded non-isothermal cold-crystallization kinetics of the nanocomposites.

    2. Novel Composites from Eco-Friendly Soy Flour/SBS Triblock Copolymer (pages 953–958)

      Vijay Kumar Thakur, David Grewell, Mahendra Thunga and Michael R. Kessler

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300368

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      The solvent-less synthesis of novel low-cost polymer composites is reported, as procured using environmentally friendly soy flour and SBS triblock copolymer.TheSF/SBS triblock copolymer green composites exhibit a significant improvement in storage modulus over the investigated temperature range and various mechanical/thermal properties.

    3. Elaboration of Superhydrophobic Surfaces containing Nanofibers and Wrinkles with Controllable Water and Oil Adhesion (pages 959–965)

      Janwa El-Maiss, Thierry Darmanin, Elisabeth Taffin de Givenchy and Frederic Guittard

      Version of Record online: 13 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300409

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      Superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable water and oil adhesion are elaborated by electrodeposition (cyclic voltammetry) of an original conducting polymer containing a short fluorinated chain. These properties are due to the formation of nanofibers and wrinkles, and are correlated to electrochemical parameters including the number of scan and scan rate.

    4. In Situ Doped Polyaniline Nanotubes for Applications in Flexible Conductive Coatings (pages 966–976)

      Sarang P. Gumfekar, Wenjie Wang and Boxin Zhao

      Version of Record online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300354

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      Electrically conductive in situ doped polyaniline nanotubes are fabricated with varied doping levels. The relationships between the level of doping and polyaniline structural features, crystallinity, and conductivity are investigated to elucidate the roles of the dopant in the structure and the properties of the polyaniline nanotubes. The polyaniline nanotubes can be used with polyvinyl alcohol to form an electrically conductive film on flexible substrates.

    5. Structure-Properties Relationship of In Situ Synthesized Poly(Butylene Succinate)/Silica Nanocomposites: Application in Extrusion Blowing of Films (pages 977–989)

      Nicolas Jacquel, René Saint-Loup, Jean-Pierre Pascault, Alain Rousseau and Françoise Fenouillot

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300370

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      Addition of nanosilicas during the synthesis via a two-step melt polycondensation reaction of poly(butylene succinate) increases the viscosity of the resulting biobased biodegradable PBS/SiO2 nanocomposites due to polymer–silica interactions. Silica nanoparticles are regularly dispersed in the PBS/SiO2 nanocomposites which exhibit very good processability by film blowing and mechanical properties are greatly enhanced.

    6. Hydrogen-Bonding Based Reversible Polymer Networks Based on Kraft Lignin and Poly(2-(Dimethylamino)Ethyl Methacrylate) Series Polymers (pages 990–1002)

      Guangzheng Gao, Muzaffer A. Karaaslan and John F. Kadla

      Version of Record online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300364

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      Reversible hydrogen-bonding based polymer networks prepared from lignin/PDMAEMA-based polymers blends is reported. Polyblend aggregation via strong intermolecular interactions prevent lignin precipitation. At neutral pH lignin/PDMAEMA-PEO-PDMAEMA aggregates assemble with a lignin/PDMAEMA block core and a primarily PEO block corona. Decreasing pH reverses the assembly process where a lignin/PEO block core and protonated PDMAEMA block corona form.

    7. Adhesives from Waste Protein Biomass for Oriented Strand Board Composites: Development and Performance (pages 1003–1012)

      Tizazu H. Mekonnen, Paolo G. Mussone, Phillip Choi and David C. Bressler

      Version of Record online: 10 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300402

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      Hydrolyzed proteins recovered from waste proteinaceous materials are chemically modified with diphenylmethane diisocyanate for oriented strand board (OSB) adhesive applications. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies confirmed covalent crosslinking between the diisocyanate and hydrolyzed protein functional groups. Mechanical performance studies of OSB specimens formulated with up to 60% by weight of protein hydrolyzate-based adhesives met commercial application requirements.

    8. Electrical Permittivity and Electrical Conductivity of Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-Polyaniline (MWCNT-PANi) Core-Shell Nanofibers and MWCNT-PANi/polystyrene Composites (pages 1013–1020)

      Ali Sarvi and Uttandaraman Sundararaj

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/mame.201300406

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      High-aspect-ratio MWCNT-polyaniline core–shell nanofibers are synthesized via in situ polymerization and dispersed in polystyrene (PS) using solution mixing. These composites exhibited electrical percolation at a much lower concentration than MWCNT/PS composites. The dielectric measurements of PANi-MWCNT/PS composites showed one order of magnitude increase in real electrical permittivity compared to that of MWCNT/PS composites.

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