Understanding complaining responses through consumers' self-consciousness disposition

Authors


Abstract

The objective of this article is to determine whether a dissatisfied consumer would select a specific complaining behavior response based on his or her self-consciousness disposition. The study used written scenarios where subjects waiting in line at a movie theater had to face additional waiting time as a consequence of an event associated with an intruder or with the service provider, and occurring either immediately in front of them or further away. Results indicated that, when faced with an additional delay related to an event occurring near them as opposed to further away from them, high private subjects, in contrast with low private subjects, had a significantly more negative perception of service quality and a strong tendency to display more negative word-of-mouth behavior. When faced with an additional delay related to an event occurring near them as opposed to further away from them, high public subjects, in contrast with low public subjects, had a significantly more negative perception of service quality and favored significantly more negative word-of-mouth behavior to express their dissatisfaction. Under a direct intrusion scenario, when compared with low public subjects, high public subjects favored significantly more negative word-of-mouth behavior and evaluated service quality in a significantly more negative way than when the loss of time was related to actions of the service provider. © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary