Shopping Orientation and Mindsets: How Motivation Influences Consumer Information Processing During Shopping

Authors


Correspondence regarding this article should be sent to: Oliver B. Büttner, Applied Social Psychology and Consumer Research, University of Vienna, Universitaetsstrasse 7, 1010 Vienna, Austria (oliver.buettner@univie.ac.at).

ABSTRACT

This research examines the cognitive procedures that underlie experiential versus task-focused shopping orientations. The authors propose that consumers with a task-focused shopping orientation and consumers with an experiential shopping orientation apply different cognitive procedures during shopping. Studies 1, 2, and 3 show that consumers with a task-focused shopping orientation are more likely to activate the cognitive procedures of an implemental mindset, whereas consumers with an experiential shopping orientation are more likely to activate the cognitive procedures of a deliberative mindset. Study 4 demonstrates a fit effect between activated cognitive procedures and shopping orientation. Activating a mindset that matches the shopping orientation increases the monetary value that consumers assign to a product. The studies extend previous research by linking shopping orientations to mindsets and by providing evidence for mindset fit. The findings suggest that marketers and retailers will benefit from addressing experiential and task-focused shoppers via the mindsets that underlie their shopping orientation.

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