Consumer brand confusion: A conceptual framework

Authors

  • Ellen R. Foxman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Bentley College, Waltham MA 02154–4705
    • Bentley College, Waltham MA 02154–4705
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    • Ellen R. Foxman is Assistant Professor of Marketing at Bentley College, Waltham MA 02154–4705. Phil W. Berger is a Doctoral Student in Business Administration, and Joseph A. Cote is Associate Professor of Marketing, both at Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–4730

  • Phil W. Berger,

    1. Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–4730
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Ellen R. Foxman is Assistant Professor of Marketing at Bentley College, Waltham MA 02154–4705. Phil W. Berger is a Doctoral Student in Business Administration, and Joseph A. Cote is Associate Professor of Marketing, both at Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–4730

  • Joseph A. Cote

    1. Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–4730
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Ellen R. Foxman is Assistant Professor of Marketing at Bentley College, Waltham MA 02154–4705. Phil W. Berger is a Doctoral Student in Business Administration, and Joseph A. Cote is Associate Professor of Marketing, both at Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–4730


Abstract

A definition and theoretical framework for consumer brand confusion are developed. Brand confusion is distinguished from related terms, such as uncertainty, miscomprehension, infringement, and deception. The factors affecting the likelihood of brand confusion are extended beyond stimulus similarity to include individual and situational factors, and propositions regarding the effects of individual and situational factors are developed. The value of a better understanding of consumer brand confusion to managers and policy makers is discussed.

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