Poly(2-oxazoline)s as Smart Bioinspired Polymers

Authors

  • Helmut Schlaad,

    Corresponding author
    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    • Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany. Fax: +49 331 567 9502
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  • Christina Diehl,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
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  • Anja Gress,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    2. Current address: BASF SE, Ludwigshafen, Germany
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  • Matthias Meyer,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    2. Current address: German Institute of Rubber Technology, Hannover, Germany
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  • A. Levent Demirel,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    2. Current address: Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • Yusuf Nur,

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
    2. Current address: Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey
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  • Annabelle Bertin

    1. Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Colloid Department, Research Campus Golm, 14424 Potsdam, Germany
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Abstract

Poly(2-alkyl-2-oxazoline)s can be regarded as pseudo-peptides or bioinspired polymers, which are available through living/controlled cationic polymerization and polymer (“click”) modification procedures. Materials and solution properties may be adjusted via the nature of the side chain (hydrophilic-hydrophobic, chiral, bio-functional, etc.), opening the way to stimulus-responsive materials and complex colloidal structures in aqueous environments. Herein, we give an overview over the macromolecular engineering of polyoxazolines, including the synthesis of biohybrids, and the “smart”/bioinspired aggregation behavior in solution.

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