Polymer Nanostructures Made by Scanning Probe Lithography: Recent Progress in Material Applications

Authors

  • Zhuang Xie,

    1. 1. Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China
    2. Advanced Research Centre for Fashion and Textiles, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China
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  • Xuechang Zhou,

    1. 1. Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China
    2. Advanced Research Centre for Fashion and Textiles, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China
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  • Xiaoming Tao,

    1. 1. Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China
    2. Advanced Research Centre for Fashion and Textiles, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China
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  • Zijian Zheng

    Corresponding author
    1. 1. Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China
    2. Advanced Research Centre for Fashion and Textiles, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China
    • 1. Nanotechnology Center, Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China.
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Abstract

Scanning probe lithography (SPL) is a series of techniques that utilizes a scanning probe or an array of probes for surface patterning. Recent developments of new material systems and patterning approaches have made SPL a promising, low-cost, bench-top, and versatile tool for fabricating various polymer nanostructures, with extraordinary importance in physical sciences, life sciences and nanotechnology. This feature article highlights the recent progress in four material applications: polymer resists, polymeric carriers for patterning functional materials, electronically active polymers and polymer brushes for tailoring surface morphology and functionality. An overview of future possibilities, with regard to challenges and opportunities in this field, is given at the end of the paper.

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