Toward Mass Producible Ordered Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaic Devices

Authors

  • Taeyong Kim,

    1. The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
    Current affiliation:
    1. T. Kim and H. Yoon contributed equally to this work.
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  • Hyunsik Yoon,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, Seoul, 139-743, Korea
    Current affiliation:
    1. T. Kim and H. Yoon contributed equally to this work.
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  • Hyung-Jun Song,

    1. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center (ISRC), Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
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  • Niko Haberkorn,

    1. Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Mainz, Duesbergweg 10-14, 55099 Mainz, Germany
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  • Younghyun Cho,

    1. The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
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  • Seung Hyun Sung,

    1. The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
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  • Chang Hee Lee,

    1. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center (ISRC), Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
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  • Kookheon Char,

    Corresponding author
    1. The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
    • The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
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  • Patrick Theato

    Corresponding author
    1. The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, The WCU Program of Chemical Convergence for Energy and Environment, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-744, Korea
    2. Institute for Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 45, 20146 Hamburg
    • Institute for Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Bundesstrasse 45, 20146 Hamburg.
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Abstract

A strategy to fabricate nanostructured poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films for organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells by a direct transfer method from a reusable soft replica mold is presented. The flexible polyfluoropolyether (PFPE) replica mold allows low-pressure and low- temperature process condition for the successful transfer of nanostructured P3HT films onto PEDOT/PSS-coated ITO substrates. To reduce the fabrication cost of masters in large area, we employed well-ordered anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) as a template. Also, we provide a method to fabricate reversed nanostructures by exploiting the self-replication of replica molds. The concept of the transfer method in low temperature with a flexible and reusable replica mold obtained from an AAO template will be a firm foundation for a low-cost fabrication process of ordered OPVs.

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