Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 12

June 17, 2009

Volume 30, Issue 12

Pages 959–1032

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 12/2009

      Joji Hasegawa, Kazuyoshi Kanamori, Kazuki Nakanishi, Teiichi Hanada and Shigeru Yamago

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990025

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      Front Cover: Well-defined macroporous polyacrylamide monoliths with mesopores in the skeletons are obtained by organotellurium-mediated living radical polymerization (TERP). Under the presence of a non-reactive polymer such as poly(ethylene oxide), spinodal-type phase separation is induced in the course of polymerization and the bicontinuous macroporous morphology is formed. Further details can be found in the article by J. Hasegawa, K. Kanamori,* K. Nakanishi, T. Hanada, and S. Yamago on page 986.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 12/2009 (pages 959–962)

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990026

  3. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Some Issues Related to Polyaniline Micro-/Nanostructures (pages 963–975)

      Meixiang Wan

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200800817

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      This feature article reviews polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures, focusing on a new development of a hard-template method, evolution of a template-free method, cooperation effect of micelle soft-template and molecular interactions as a new approach, multi-functionality of nanostructures based on a template-free method, electrical and transport properties of a single nanotube measured by a four-probe method, and sensors guided by reversible switching wettability.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Well-Organized CdS/C60 in Block Copolymer Micellar Cores (pages 976–980)

      Haeng-Deog Koh, Jung-Pil Lee and Jae-Suk Lee

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900036

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      C60 molecules were successfully incorporated into free pyridines of CdS-containing poly(2-vinylpyridine) cores of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) micelles by charge-transfer complexation between C60 molecules and free pyridines. CdS and C60 are shown to be harmoniously well-organized in a micellar core.

    2. Unusual Photopolymerization Behavior of Amino Acid-Derived Polydiacetylene Supramolecules (pages 981–985)

      Jaewon Yoon, Kamalrul Azlan Bin Azizan, Hyun Oh Yoo, Shuji Okada and Jong-Man Kim

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900016

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      Photopolymerization of a suspension derived from amino acid-derived amphiphilic diacetylene supramolecules results in the initial formation of species that absorb at 640 nm followed by the generation of polymers that have longer wavelength (686 nm) absorbances.

    3. Rigid Crosslinked Polyacrylamide Monoliths with Well-Defined Macropores Synthesized by Living Polymerization (pages 986–990)

      Joji Hasegawa, Kazuyoshi Kanamori, Kazuki Nakanishi, Teiichi Hanada and Shigeru Yamago

      Article first published online: 1 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900066

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      The rigid crosslinked polyacrylamide monoliths with well-defined macropores are successfully fabricated by living radical polymerization accompanied by spinodal decomposition. They are promising materials with highly hydrophilic polyacrylamide surfaces and have enough strength to withstand the surface tension arising in the repetitive swelling and drying which is inevitable in many applications.

    4. Electric Field-Aided Formation Combined with a Nanoimprinting Technique for Replicating a Plant Leaf (pages 991–996)

      Geun Hyung Kim, Ho Jun Jeon and Hyeon Yoon

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900076

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      To fabricate a patterned micro/nano-sized replica of the plant structure, a taro leaf, an AC electric field-aided technology combined with a micro/nanoimprinting technique (FA-NIT) was used. This method consists of two steps: applying an electric field to a polymer in its liquid state under the plant leaves, which have a micro/nano-surface structure, and the curing process of the liquid polymer under the applied electric field condition. The surface roughness fabricated by FA-NIT was about 45% higher than by the normal micro/nanoimprinting technique.

    5. Regioregulated Syntheses of Poly(aminopyridine)s by Pd-catalyzed Amination Reaction (pages 997–1001)

      Junpei Kuwabara, Hironori Mori, Takuya Teratani, Munetaka Akita and Takaki Kanbara

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900033

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      Regioregulated poly(aminopyridine)s were obtained by a Pd-catalyzed C[BOND]N coupling reaction. A large difference in reactivity was observed between 5-amino-2-bromopyridine and 2-amino-5-bromopyridine. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that electron densities of the Br-bound carbon atom and the pyridine-nitrogen atom determine the reactivity of the monomers.

    6. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of pH-Responsive Amphiphilic Poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-block-Poly(pentafluorostyrene) Block Copolymer in Aqueous Solution (pages 1002–1008)

      Beng H. Tan, Chakravarthy S. Gudipati, Hazrat Hussain, Chaobin He, Ye Liu and Thomas P. Davis

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200800799

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      Well-defined pH-responsive amphiphilic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(pentafluorostyrene) (PDMAEMA-b-PPFS) copolymers with two different PPFS block lengths were successfully synthesized by RAFT-mediated living radical polymerization. The copolymers formed spherical micelles in aqueous solution consisting of dense PPFS cores surrounded by dangling PDMAEMA chains as the micelle corona. The micelles possessed larger sizes at low pH resulting from protonated PDMAEMA segments on the corona. The size gradually decreased when pH was increased, due to deprotonation of the coronas resulting in lower osmotic pressures.

    7. Facile Access to Hydroxy-Functional Core–Shell Microspheres via Grafting of Ethylene Oxide by Anionic Ring-Opening Polymerization (pages 1009–1014)

      Raymond Joso, Stefan Reinicke, Andreas Walther, Holger Schmalz, Axel H. E. Müller and Leonie Barner

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900031

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      Ethylene oxide is grafted from crosslinked poly(divinyl benzene) microspheres by a one-pot ring-opening anionic polymerization using sec-BuLi as an activator along with the phosphazene base tert-BuP4. The microspheres are characterized by SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The hydroxy end groups of the grafted PEO are subsequently activated with N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC), reacted with rhodamine B and characterized by fluorescence microscopy.

    8. Synthesis, Characterization and Self-Assembly of Novel Amphiphilic Block Copolymers with a Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes Moiety Attached at the Junction of the Two Blocks (pages 1015–1020)

      Liang Zhang, Dairen Lu, Kang Tao and Ruke Bai

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900042

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      A novel amphiphilic block copolymer possessing a POSS moiety at the junction of PS and PEO and with a well-defined structure was successfully synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. The polymers can form vesicles in aqueous solution, as shown by characterization with TEM and SEM.

    9. Design and Synthesis of Fast-Degrading Poly(anhydride-esters) (pages 1021–1026)

      Ashley L. Carbone and Kathryn E. Uhrich

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900029

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      Relative for sustained released systems for biomaterials, polymers that have a rapid, yet controlled release of bioactive are desirable for wound care, personal/oral care, and food applications. Fast-degrading, salicylate-based poly(anhydride-esters) have been designed and synthesized, and their in vitro hydrolytic degradation demonstrates these polymers can completely release the bioactive within 48 h, a critical time period for wound care applications.

    10. Fabrication of Aligned Polyaniline Nanofiber Array via a Facile Wet Chemical Process (pages 1027–1032)

      Qunhui Sun, Wu Bi, Thomas F. Fuller, Yong Ding and Yulin Deng

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900064

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      A self-assembled monolayer of 4-aminothiophenol on a gold surface was demonstrated for the first time to be effective in guiding the growth of aligned polyaniline nanofibers for fabricating a patterned array.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 12/2009

      Geun Hyung Kim, Ho Jun Jeon and Hyeon Yoon

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: The image shows a newly suggested technique, which was supplemented with an AC electric field combined with a micro-/nanoimprinting process, to fabricate a patterned micro-/nanoscale-sized replica of the plant structure of a taro leaf. Further details can be found in the article by G. H. Kim,* H. J. Jeon, and H. Yoon* on page 991.

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