Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 15

August 3, 2009

Volume 30, Issue 15

Pages 1291–1361

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 12/2009

      Thorsten Schwalm, Jens Wiesecke, Stefan Immel and Matthias Rehahn

      Version of Record online: 28 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: Various stages of a Gilch polymerization are displayed, including starting materials, products, intermediates, transition states, and side products. The pictures on the right symbolize applications of the formed polymers, reprinted with permission by Fraunhofer IAP (OLED), Fraunhofer ISE (solar cell), and PolyIC (RFID tag). Further details can be found in the article by T. Schwalm, J. Wiesecke, S. Immel, and M. Rehahn* on page 1295.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
  3. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. The Gilch Synthesis of Poly(p-phenylene vinylenes): Mechanistic Knowledge in the Service of Advanced Materials (pages 1295–1322)

      Thorsten Schwalm, Jens Wiesecke, Stefan Immel and Matthias Rehahn

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900104

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      The Gilch route is a powerful methodology for the synthesis of PPVs, but has some severe drawbacks too: the polymers contain constitutional defects, and their molar masses are difficult to control. Recent mechanistic studies, summarized in this feature article, provide a much deeper understanding of the reaction cascadeinvolved, and might render available improved PPVs for organic electronics applications.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Design of Soluble Hyperbranched Polythiophenes with Tailor-Made Optoelectronic Properties (pages 1323–1327)

      Thomas V. Richter, Steffen Link, Ralf Hanselmann and Sabine Ludwigs

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900186

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      Hyperbranched polythiophenes are prepared via a simple one-pot synthesis approach of branched monomers. Only small variations in the building unit and architecture lead to large differences of absorption and PL properties. This versatile approach can be used for the design of tailor made, functional materials for optoelectronic applications.

    2. ‘Click’ Functionalization of Cryogels Conveniently Verified and Quantified Using High-Resolution MAS NMR Spectroscopy (pages 1328–1333)

      Wim Van Camp, Tugba Dispinar, Bart Dervaux, Filip E. Du Prez, José C. Martins and Bernd Fritzinger

      Version of Record online: 20 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900087

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      High-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS) NMR spectroscopy is shown to be a general applicable technique to monitor, characterize and quantify the chemical modification reactions of macroporous network structures (cryogels) by Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne ‘click’ cycloaddition reactions.

    3. Control of Induced Chirality in Optically Active Poly(N-propargylcarbamate) Films by Solvent Vapor (pages 1334–1338)

      Toshiyuki Fukushima and Kenji Tsuchihara

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900156

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      Chiral polyethyne derivatives with lyotropic liquid crystalline properties exhibited characteristic induced chirality in their films, which was detected by circular-dichroism spectroscopy. The induced chirality in the film was highly dependent on the casting solvent and concentration. As a versatile method, exposure to organic-solvent vapor at room temperature induced and inversed the characteristic chirality in the film.

    4. Synthesis of a Fluorescent Polymer Bearing Covalently Linked Thienylene Moieties and Rhodamine for Efficient Sensing (pages 1339–1344)

      Mei Zhu, Chunjie Zhou, Yingjie Zhao, Yongjun Li, Huibiao Liu and Yuliang Li

      Version of Record online: 26 MAY 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900210

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      A novel conjugated polymer of poly[p-(phenylene ethynylene)-alt-(thienyleneethynylene)] (PPETE) with a Rhodamine B receptor that bears linked thienylene rings (RB-PPETE) has been prepared and the polymer system has been used to detect metal ions. Hg2+ is able to induce the Rhodamine group to form a ring-opened state, which leads to a visual color change from a slight yellow to an orange solution. Utilizing the advantage of the amplified detection signal of conjugated polymers, RB-PPETE exhibited outstanding Hg2+-selective FRET off–on type fluoroionophoric properties among the representative metal ions in THF solution.

    5. Ultrahigh-Density Carbon Nanoring Arrays on Silicon Wafer through Templated Solution Deposition Method (pages 1345–1349)

      Xikui Liu and Manfred Stamm

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900111

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      Ultrahigh-density carbon nanoring arrays on silicon wafer are achieved by a novel templated solution deposition method. Initially the nanodot arrays fabricated from an ordered nanoporous thin film are used as a template to direct the surface dewetting of a phenolic precursor, followed by calcination and removal of the silica nanodot arrays, which results in large area carbon nanoring arrays with a diameter as small as 25 nm, and corresponds to an ultrahigh density of about one terabit per square inch.

    6. One-Step Preparation of Antimicrobial Polyrhodanine Nanotubes with Silver Nanoparticles (pages 1350–1355)

      Hyeyoung Kong, Jooyoung Song and Jyongsik Jang

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900106

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      Polyrhodanine nanotubes with silver nanoparticles were fabricated using a template-free, one-step chemical-oxidation polymerization with the aid of ethyl alcohol solvent. Antibacterial tests revealed that the synthesized silver/polyrhodanine nanotubes had an excellent antimicrobial potency against Gram-negative bacteria, E. coli and Gram-positive bacteria, S. aureus.

    7. Coordination-Polymeric Nanofibers and their Field-Emission Properties (pages 1356–1361)

      Sudip K. Batabyal, Abdul Malik Puthan Peedikakkal, Seeram Ramakrishna, Chorng Haur Sow and Jagadese J. Vittal

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900230

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      1D coordination polymers (CPs) can be processed like organic polymers on a large scale by electrospinning. CP nanofibers are obtained from the CP gels by mixing Ni(OAc)2 with the linear spacer ligands, 4,4′-bis(pyridyl)ethylene or 4,4′-bipyridine, in organic solvents. One-dimensional polymeric structures have been proposed for these gels and nanofibers based on their crystal structures. Furthermore, these nanofibers show interesting photo- and electroemissive properties.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 15/2009

      Toshiyuki Fukushima and Kenji Tsuchihara

      Version of Record online: 28 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: By exposure to solvent vapor, inducement of chiral organization suggested by a more split and amplified circular-dichroic pattern is found in films of chiral poly(acetylene) derivatives that had no chiral organization element. Inversion of the handedness of chiral organization is also achieved. Further details can be found in the article by T. Fukushima and K. Tsuchihara* on page 1334.

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