Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 22

November 19, 2009

Volume 30, Issue 22

Pages 1867–1949

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 22/2009

      Nathalie Lefèvre, Charles-André Fustin and Jean-François Gohy

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990056

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      Front Cover: Polymeric micelles containing noncovalent complexes based on electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds are reviewed. A typical example where complexes between green and red blocks are insoluble and further aggregate into a micellar core is shown. This core is stabilized by the uncomplexed soluble blue blocks. Further details can be found in the article by N. Lefèvre, C.-A. Fustin, and J.-F. Gohy*on page 1871.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 22/2009 (pages 1867–1870)

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990057

  3. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Polymeric Micelles Induced by Interpolymer Complexation (pages 1871–1888)

      Nathalie Lefèvre, Charles-André Fustin and Jean-François Gohy

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900355

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      Polymeric micelles that contain non-covalent complexes based on electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds are reviewed. Different combinations of polymers can be used, e.g., A+B, AC+B, AC+BC, AC+BD, and ACD+B, in which A and B represent the interacting blocks. In the vast majority of the cases, the A+B complexes are insoluble in the solvent used and further aggregate into insoluble domains stabilized by the uncomplexed soluble blocks.

  4. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Phenylenevinylene Block Copolymers via Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization (pages 1889–1892)

      Chin-Yang Yu, James W. Kingsley, David G. Lidzey and Michael L. Turner

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900345

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      Sequential ring opening metathesis polymerization of strained cyclophanediene monomers gives fully conjugated BCPs containing 1,4- and 1,3-phenylenevinylene repeating units. This approach gives well-defined polymers with good control of the polymer molecular weight and the volume fraction of the copolymers. Thin films of these polymers show extensive phase separation and efficient energy transfer between the different constituent blocks.

  5. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 22/2009

      David M. Walba, Hong Yang, Patrick Keller, Chenhui Zhu, Renfan Shao, David A. Coleman, Christopher D. Jones and Noel A. Clark

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990058

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      Frontispiece: A new main-chain liquid-crystalline polymer exhibiting a de Vries chiral smectic A mesophase is synthesized by Hoveyda–Grubbs acyclic diene metathesis polymerization. Well-aligned fibers are obtained. Further details can be found in the article by D. M. Walba,* H. Yang, P. Keller,* C. Zhu, R. Shao, D. A. Coleman, C. D. Jones, and N. A. Clark on page 1894.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. A Main-Chain de Vries Smectic Liquid Crystal Polymer Prepared by Hoveyda–Grubbs Catalyst Initiated Acyclic Diene Metathesis Polymerization (pages 1894–1899)

      David M. Walba, Hong Yang, Patrick Keller, Chenhui Zhu, Renfan Shao, David A. Coleman, Christopher D. Jones and Noel A. Clark

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900249

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      A main-chain de Vries smectic liquid crystal polymer is obtained by a applying Hoveyda–Grubbs 2nd generation catalyst in acyclic diene metathesis polymerization of a monomer containing on one end a terminal dimethylvinylsilyl group and at the other end a terminal C=C. Several physical characterization methods including X-ray diffraction, optical observation, and microtome techniques are used to investigate the internal structural organization in this liquid crystalline fiber.

    2. Cyclopolymerization of Nonconjugated Dienes with a Tridentate Phenoxyamine Hafnium Complex Supported by an sp3-C Donor: Isotactic Enchainment and Diastereoselective cis-Ring Closure (pages 1900–1906)

      Joseph B. Edson and Geoffrey W. Coates

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900422

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      Cyclopolymerization of 1,5-hexadiene and 1,6-heptadiene with high isospecificity and moderate to high cis-diastereoselectivity is accomplished with a chiral hafnium catalyst.

    3. Large Stokes-Shift Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Enhanced Emission Over Free Dye for Single Excitation Multiplexing (pages 1907–1910)

      Erik Herz, Andrew Burns, Daniel Bonner and Ulrich Wiesner

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900389

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      The formation of fluorescent coreshell silica nanoparticles with diameters <10nm incorporating a series of graded, large stokes-shift dyes that allow multiplexing with a single excitation source is reported. Significant per-dye brightness enhancements are achieved through encapsulation, and are easily observed under laser illumination.

    4. Annular Multi-Shelled Spherulites in Interiors of Bulk-Form Poly(nonamethylene terephthalate) (pages 1911–1916)

      Yu-Fan Chen and Eamor M. Woo

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900292

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      Ring textures were found to exist on the fractured surfaces or microtomed films from bulk PNT samples. From the analysis on microtomed films taken from the inner portion of bulk-form PNT, the growth of spherulites in three dimensions is proposed to be layer-by-layer, forming a multi-shell structure in sphere. The three-dimensional shell thus exhibits cross-section surfaces appearing like concentric ring bands, which are the patterns in thin-film growth.

    5. Formation of Two Kinds of Hexagonally Arranged Structures in ABC Triblock Copolymer Thin Films Induced by a Strongly Selective Solvent Vapor (pages 1917–1921)

      Chunxia Luo, Weihuan Huang and Yanchun Han

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900427

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      ABC triblock copolymer films of polystyrene-block-poly(butadiene)-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) undergo an order–order transition (OOT) in the sequence of hexagonally arranged core–shell cylinders to double-hexagonally arranged dots upon exposure to a solvent vapor that is strongly selective for the two end blocks. The morphology is also found to be dependent on film thickness.

    6. A Facile Strategy for Preparation of α-Heterobifunctional Polystyrenes with Well-Defined Molecular Weight (pages 1922–1927)

      Yun Wang, Lu Lu, Hu Wang, Dairen Lu, Kang Tao and Ruke Bai

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900454

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      ε-Caprolactone end-capped polystyrenes are synthesized using α-bromo-ε-caprolactone as an initiator by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene and then α-heterobifunctional polystyrenes are obtained by the ring-opening reaction of the caprolactone end group with amines, alcohol, and water.

    7. Synthesis of a Photoresponsive Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Containing Azobenzene (pages 1928–1935)

      Chensha Li, Chi-Wei Lo, Difeng Zhu, Chenhui Li, Ye Liu and Hongrui Jiang

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900421

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      Photoinduced bending of a liquid crystal elastomer thin film that contains azobenzene chromophores is reported. The initially flat film bends toward the irradiation direction of the incident 366nm UV light. The simple synthesis of the azobenzene-containing monomer and crosslinker presented may prove versatile for future related systems.

    8. Polymer-Infiltrated Aligned Carbon Nanotube Fibers by in situ Polymerization (pages 1936–1939)

      Shanju Zhang, Lingbo Zhu, Ching-Ping Wong and Satish Kumar

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900370

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      Carbon nanotube fiber based polymer composites were prepared by in situ polymerization. Amorphous polymer at the nanotube interface exhibited local ordering and the resultant composite fibers showed excellent mechanical properties.

    9. Construction of Large-Scale Highly Ordered Macroporous Monoliths of π-Conjugated Polymers (pages 1940–1944)

      Zicheng Zuo, Yanbing Guo, Yuliang Li, Jing Lv, Huibiao Liu, Jialiang Xu and Yongjun Li

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900411

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      Macroporous π-conjugated polymer monoliths are successfully prepared through an approach that uses micrometer-sized naphthalene crystals as templates. PPV and PPE assemble inside the template naphthalene crystals, which have a continuous lamellar shape and homogeneous diameters. The prepared polymer monoliths have straight and lamellar macroporous structures. The diameter and wall thickness of the pores can be controlled by tuning the freezing temperature.

    10. A Magnetically Tunable Colloidal Crystal Film for Reflective Display (pages 1945–1949)

      Cun Zhu, Liangshui Chen, Hua Xu and Zhongze Gu

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900392

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      A magnetic field responsive and tunable colloidal crystal film has been developed by depositing monodisperse Fe3O4/PS composite magnetic nanospheres on the surface of agarose-gel coated substrate. The resultant film has good optical properties, large tuning range and controllable color and pattern, which will provide potential application in novel sensors, displays and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communication
    6. Frontispiece
    7. Communications
    8. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 22/2009

      Chensha Li, Chi-Wei Lo, Difeng Zhu, Chenhui Li, Ye Liu and Hongrui Jiang

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200990059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: A photoresponsive liquid-crystalline elastomeric polymer film shows reversible deformation under alternating UV and natural light. The film serves as an optical high-pass/low-pass switch of a laser beam: when the UV light is on, it bends up and blocks the laser beam; when the UV light is off, the film flattens out, allowing the beam to pass. Further details can be found in the article by C. Li, C.-W. Lo, D. Zhu, C. Li, Y. Liu, and H. Jiang*on page 1928.

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