Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 17

Special Issue: Polymers in Biomedicine and Electronics

September 1, 2010

Volume 31, Issue 17

Pages 1483–1567

Issue edited by: M. R. Buchmeiser, M. Rehahn, R. Haag, A. Lendlein

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2010

      Michiaki Kumagai, Tridib Kumar Sarma, Horacio Cabral, Sachiko Kaida, Masaki Sekino, Nicholas Herlambang, Kensuke Osada, Mitsunobu R. Kano, Nobuhiro Nishiyama and Kazunori Kataoka

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090045

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      Front Cover: The image represents Polymers in Biomedicine and Electronics—a collage by Kataoka and co-workers and Meerholz and co-workers. The top-left half shows high-density poly(ethylene glycol)-coated iron oxide/gold core/shell nanoparticles that can accumulate in tumors, facilitating negative enhancement of the tumor site in T2-weighted MR images. Novel hole-transporting polymers with tetraarylbenzidines or tetraarylphenylenediamines as charge-transporting units with a non-conjugating fluorine bridge are presented in the bottom-right image. Crosslinkable derivatives are promising candidates for solution-processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and will be incorporated into highly efficient green-light-emitting phosphorescent OLEDs for improved charge injection. Further details can be found in the articles by M. Kumagai, T. K. Sarma, H. Cabral, S. Kaida, M. Sekino, N. Herlambang, K. Osada, M. R. Kano, N. Nishiyama, and K. Kataoka*on page 1521 and by J. Schelter, G. F. Mielke, A. Köhnen, J. Wies, S. Köber, O. Nuyken,* and K. Meerholz*on page 1560.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Polymers in Biomedicine and Electronics (pages 1487–1491)

      Andreas Lendlein, Matthias Rehahn, Michael R. Buchmeiser and Rainer Haag

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000426

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Synthesis, Characterization and Preliminary Biological Evaluation of P(HPMA)-b-P(LLA) Copolymers: A New Type of Functional Biocompatible Block Copolymer (pages 1492–1500)

      Matthias Barz, Florian K. Wolf, Fabiana Canal, Kaloian Koynov, Maria J. Vicent, Holger Frey and Rudolf Zentel

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000090

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      In this paper the synthesis of novel biocompatible amphiphilic block copolymers is described. The synthesis of poly-(HPMA)-b-poly(LLA) polymers relies on a combination of ring-opening polymerization of L-lactide, conversion into a CTA for the afterwards performed RAFT polymerization. The block copolymer aggregates have been applied to fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and first cell studies in human cervix adenocarcinoma cells.

    2. Tailored Albumin-based Copolymers for Receptor-Mediated Delivery of Perylenediimide Guest Molecules (pages 1501–1508)

      Klaus Eisele, Radu Gropeanu, Ashlan Musante, Gunnar Glasser, Chen Li, Klaus Muellen and Tanja Weil

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000176

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      A novel and multifunctional copolymer based on a human serum albumin backbone bearing several folic acid as well as PEO groups has been successfully synthesized. The novel albumin-based copolymer serves as an efficient, multifunctional and biocompatible carrier system presumably facilitating the directed delivery of lipophilic drug molecules into cancer cells.

    3. Degradation of Hyper-Branched Poly(ethylenimine)-graft-poly(caprolactone)-block-monomethoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol) as a Potential Gene Delivery Vector (pages 1509–1515)

      Yu Liu, Terry Steele and Thomas Kissel

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000337

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      The degradation behavior of a series of water-soluble positively charged hyper-branched poly(ethylenimine)-graft-polycaprolactone-block-monomethoxyl-poly- (ethylene glycol) copolymers, abbreviated as hy-PEI-PCl-mPEG, is investigated under in vitro conditions. The influences of copolymer compositions, and pH and ionic strength of buffer are considered. The degradation is controllable and reasonable for gene transfer in vivo.

    4. Supramolecular Aggregates of Water Soluble Dendritic Polyglycerol Architectures for the Solubilization of Hydrophobic Compounds (pages 1516–1520)

      Indah N. Kurniasih, Hua Liang, Jürgen P. Rabe and Rainer Haag

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000112

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      Dendritic core–shell architectures which are based on hyperbranched polyglycerol for the solubilization of hydrophobic drugs have been synthesized and characterized. The core of hyperbranched polyglycerol has been modified with hydrophobic biphenyl groups or perfluorinated alkyl chains to increase the core hydrophobicity of the macromolecules. These amphiphilic core–shell type architectures were then used to solubilize pyrene, nile red, and a perfluoro tagged diazo dye, as well as the drug nimodipine in water.

    5. Enhanced in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumors by PEGylated Iron-Oxide–Gold Core–Shell Nanoparticles with Prolonged Blood Circulation Properties (pages 1521–1528)

      Michiaki Kumagai, Tridib Kumar Sarma, Horacio Cabral, Sachiko Kaida, Masaki Sekino, Nicholas Herlambang, Kensuke Osada, Mitsunobu R. Kano, Nobuhiro Nishiyama and Kazunori Kataoka

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000341

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-density poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated iron-oxide–gold core–shell nanoparticles (AuIONs) were developed as T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for cancer imaging. The relatively small hydrodynamic diameter along with a high PEG density facilitated extended circulation of PEG-AuIONs which allowed for accumulation into pancreatic cancer models through the EPR effect and indicate that PEG-AuIONs are a promising MRI contrast agent for diagnosis of malignant tumors, including pancreatic cancer.

    6. Modular StarPEG-Heparin Gels with Bifunctional Peptide Linkers (pages 1529–1533)

      Mikhail V. Tsurkan, Karolina Chwalek, Kandice R. Levental, Uwe Freudenberg and Carsten Werner

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bifunctional peptide linkers containing matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive and cell adhesive modules were prepared and applied to form cell-responsive starPEG-heparin hydrogels. Migration experiments with human endothelial cells demonstrate the options of the developed hydrogel system for the stimulation of angiogenesis in regenerative therapies.

    7. Knowledge-Based Tailoring of Gelatin-Based Materials by Functionalization with Tyrosine-Derived Groups (pages 1534–1539)

      Axel Thomas Neffe, Alessandro Zaupa, Benjamin Franklin Pierce, Dieter Hofmann and Andreas Lendlein

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000274

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      The functionalization of gelatin with tyrosine derivatives specifically at the lysine residues leads to the reduction of Young's modulus and degree of swelling. The net-points of the physical networks are aromatic clusters rather than triple helical regions, as shown by WAXS and molecular modeling, and therefore depend on the degree of functionalization and not the thermomechanical treatment of the materials.

    8. Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Synthesis of CaCO3 Nanoparticle-Reinforced Polymeric Monoliths for Tissue Engineering (pages 1540–1545)

      Franziska Weichelt, Bernhard Frerich, Solvig Lenz, Stefanie Tiede and Michael R. Buchmeiser

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous monolithic materials with macropores in the 30–120 μm regime have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis polymerization from norborn-2-ene and a 7-oxanorborn-2-ene-based cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents and of surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles using the 3rd-generation Grubbs- initiator RuCl2(Py)2(IMesH2)(CHPh). A homogeneous distribution of the inorganic nanoparticles throughout the polymeric monolith was achieved. The CaCO3 nanoparticle-filled monoliths were subjected to cell cultivation experiments using adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ATSCs).

    9. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Studies of Poly(ε-caprolactone) Networks with Grafted Poly(ethylene glycol) Chains to Investigate Structural Changes during Dual- and Triple-Shape Effect (pages 1546–1553)

      Wolfgang Wagermaier, Thomas Zander, Dieter Hofmann, Karl Kratz, U. Narendra Kumar and Andreas Lendlein

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Triple-shape polymers constitute an intriguing class of active materials that offer key potential for various applications. A defined polymer morphology and thermomechanical programming are crucial to enable a shape-memory effect. This article highlights in situ X-ray scattering studies on multiphase polymer networks to elucidate principal structural features that enable a dual- and triple-shape effect.

    10. Diketopyrrolopyrroles as Acceptor Materials in Organic Photovoltaics (pages 1554–1559)

      Bram P. Karsten, Johan C. Bijleveld and René A. J. Janssen

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diketopyrrolopyrroles (DPPs) are explored in the search of new electron acceptor materials for organic solar cells. DPPs have already been successfully used as donor materials, but also have low reduction potentials and significant electron mobilities. A series of small DPP molecules is presented and the compounds are tested as electron acceptors, in combination with polythiophene as a donor, in organic solar cells. The best device shows an efficiency of 0.31%.

    11. Novel Non-Conjugated Main-Chain Hole-Transporting Polymers for Organic Electronics Application (pages 1560–1567)

      Jürgen Schelter, Georg Felix Mielke, Anne Köhnen, Jenna Wies, Sebastian Köber, Oskar Nuyken and Klaus Meerholz

      Version of Record online: 9 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000125

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The synthesis of novel hole-transporting polymers with tetraarylbenzidines or tetraarylphenylenediamines as charge-transporting units with a non-conjugating fluorene bridge is shown. The cross-linkable derivatives are promising candidates for solution-processed multilayer OLEDs and will be incorporated into highly-efficient green-emitting phosphorescent OLEDs for improved charge injection.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 17/2010

      Matthias Barz, Florian K. Wolf, Fabiana Canal, Kaloian Koynov, Maria J. Vicent, Holger Frey and Rudolf Zentel

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: The image presents the synthesis and characterization of aggregates and intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled P(HPMA)-b-P(LLA) block copolymers. The reactive precursor polymer P(PFMA)-b-P(LLA) enables the incorporation of various functionalities, while the biodegradable PLLA block can be used to encapsulate bioactive agents. More details can be found in the article by M. Barz, F. K. Wolf, F. Canal, K. Koynov, M. J. Vicent, H. Frey, and R. Zentel*on page 1492.

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