Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 18

September 15, 2010

Volume 31, Issue 18

Pages 1575–1651

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2010

      Anja S. Goldmann, Christine Schödel, Andreas Walther, Jiayin Yuan, Katja Loos and Axel H. E. Müller

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090048

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: The image by Lyudmilla Zinkova depicts click-chemistry groups strongly anchored to nanoparticle surfaces via a biomimetic dopamine-like anchor, inspired by the universal adhesive properties of the mussel byssus, whereas click-chemistry units give rise to widespread and facile chemical functionalization. The background shows a Mytilus mussel anchored to rock. Further information can be found in the article by A. S. Goldmann, C. Schödel, A. Walther, J. Yuan, K. Loos, and A. H. E. Müller*on page 1608.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2010 (pages 1575–1577)

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090049

  3. Feature Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Jewelry Box of Morphologies with Mesoscopic Length Scales – ABC Star-shaped Terpolymers (pages 1579–1587)

      Yushu Matsushita, Kenichi Hayashida and Atsushi Takano

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Star-shaped terpolymers of the ABC type bearing incompatible polymer components show a variety of mesoscopically-ordered structures depending on relative chain length ratio or sample environment such as casting solvents and temperatures under which they are formed. Their morphological features are clarified and summarized in this article.

    2. Light-Responsive Block Copolymers (pages 1588–1607)

      Jean-Marc Schumers, Charles-André Fustin and Jean-François Gohy

      Article first published online: 20 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000108

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-responsive block copolymers are reviewed. The different photo-responsive moieties that have been incorporated so far in block copolymers as well as the proposed applications are discussed both in solution and in bulk.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Biomimetic Mussel Adhesive Inspired Clickable Anchors Applied to the Functionalization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles (pages 1608–1615)

      Anja S. Goldmann, Christine Schödel, Andreas Walther, Jiayin Yuan, Katja Loos and Axel H. E. Müller

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000193

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) with a biomimetic mussel adhesive inspired clickable anchor is presented. For this purpose, an alkyne-catechol derivative is utilized and functionalized with azido-Rhodamine and azido-end group functionalized poly(ethylene glycol).

    2. Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Prepared via Living/Controlled Radical Polymerization (RAFT) (pages 1616–1621)

      Andreas Kaiser, Sven Brandau, Michael Klimpel and Christopher Barner-Kowollik

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient solution-based strategy for the synthesis of the commercially important copolymer of acrylonitrile and butadiene is presented. The application of RAFT techniques in a solution polymerization process is leading to excellent control over molar mass and end group functionality of the generated nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR).

    3. Multicomponent Phase Change Microfibers Prepared by Temperature Control Multifluidic Electrospinning (pages 1622–1627)

      Nü Wang, Hongyan Chen, Ling Lin, Yong Zhao, Xinyu Cao, Yanlin Song and Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000185

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel kind of multicomponent phase change microfibers are prepared by temperature control multifluidic compound-jet electrospinning technique. The multicomponent microfibers not only show a special multichannel tubular microstructure but also could encapsulate several different materials into the channels independently.

    4. Effect of Coordination on the Glucose-Responsiveness of PEG-b-(PAA-co-PAAPBA) Micelles (pages 1628–1634)

      Beilei Wang, Rujiang Ma, Gan Liu, Xiaojun Liu, Yaohua Gao, Junyang Shen, Yingli An and Linqi Shi

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A facile way to enable micelles self-assembled from PEG-b-(PAA-co-PAAPBA) with varying modification degrees that possess glucose-responsiveness at varying pH values is discussed. 11B MAS NMR analysis shows that interactions between PAAPBA segments and PAA segments induce boron changes from the trigonal planar form to the tetrahedral form and cause the different glucose-responsiveness of PEG-b-(PAA-co-PAAPBA) micelles as the modification degree changes.

    5. A Study of Polymerization-Induced Phase Separation as a Route to Produce Porous Polymer–Metal Materials (pages 1635–1640)

      Stanislav Dubinsky, Alla Petukhova, Ilya Gourevich and Eugenia Kumacheva

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymerization-induced phase separation is a new one-step approach to produce porous polymer materials carrying inorganic nanoparticles on the surface of pores. The density of nanoparticles on the pore surface can be conveniently controlled by the rate of polymerization.

    6. Control over Internal Structure of Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanofibers by Electrospinning (pages 1641–1645)

      Keita Nakashima, Kazuma Tsuboi, Hidetoshi Matsumoto, Ryohei Ishige, Masatoshi Tokita, Junji Watanabe and Akihiko Tanioka

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The formation and orientation of the ordered structure in the liquid crystal polymer (LCP) could be controlled by the fiber diameter during electrospinning. For electrospun main-chain LCP, BB-5(3-Me), the SmA structure with two layer spacings was formed in the fiber, and was highly oriented in the fiber under optimal spinning condition.

    7. Tuning the Properties of Functional Pyrrolidinium Polymers by (Co)polymerization of Diallyldimethylammonium Ionic Liquids (pages 1646–1651)

      V. Jovanovski, R. Marcilla and David Mecerreyes

      Article first published online: 22 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201000215

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New polymeric ionic liquids that have pyrrolidinium moieties in the backbone are synthesized by polymerization of new diallyldimethylammonium ionic liquids having TFSI, BF4, PF6, or SCN anions. This polymerization route may lead to the synthesis of a new family of random copolymers that having a similar poly(DADMA+) backbone and a mixture of counter-anions determined by the comonomer selection. The physico-chemical properties of the polymers are determined by the counter-anion composition.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 18/2010

      Jean-Marc Schumers, Charles-André Fustin and Jean-François Gohy

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: The picture presents stimuli-responsive polymers, which are able to show responses to various environmental changes. Among those stimuli, light has attracted much attention since it can be localized in time and space, and it can also be triggered from outside the system. In the related feature article, light-responsive block copolymers are reviewed. Further details can be found in the article by J.-M. Schumers, C.-A. Fustin,* and J.-F. Gohy*on page 1588.

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