Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 3

February 2, 2010

Volume 31, Issue 3

Pages 243–322

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2010

      Christine Mangold, Frederik Wurm, Boris Obermeier and Holger Frey

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090004

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      Front Cover: The picture presents the synthetic route to novel polyfunctional PEG-based polymers bearing a single terminal amino group and multiple hydroxyl groups. The lower pictures illustrate the tunable materials properties ranging from highly crystalline to amorphous depending on the amount of comonomer content. Further details can be found in the article by C. Mangold, F. Wurm, B. Obermeier, and H. Frey*on page 258.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2010 (pages 243–246)

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090005

  3. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Recent Developments Concerning the Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers (pages 247–257)

      Brian P. Grady

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900514

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      One key technological issue to enable the use of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites is to be able to predict and control nanotube dispersion. This feature article casts a critical eye on the science of dispersion, and also tries to predict where the field is headed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Hetero-Multifunctional Poly(ethylene glycol) Copolymers with Multiple Hydroxyl Groups and a Single Terminal Functionality (pages 258–264)

      Christine Mangold, Frederik Wurm, Boris Obermeier and Holger Frey

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900472

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      Multifunctional poly[(ethylene glycol)-co-glycerol] polyethers with multiple hydroxyl groups and orthogonal terminal moiety have been prepared. A series of polymers with varying comonomer ratio was obtained by copolymerization of EO and EEGE, followed by the removal of the orthogonal protecting groups. The materials are promising for bioconjugation and PEGylation.

    2. Liquid Crystalline Period Variations in Self-Assembled Block Copolypeptides–Surfactant Ionic Complexes (pages 265–269)

      Chaoxu Li, Jingguo Li, Xiuqiang Zhang, Afang Zhang and Raffaele Mezzenga

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900633

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      Variations in the liquid crystalline periodicity of block copolypeptide–surfactant ionic complexes can be tuned using random and block copolypeptides with amino acid sequence conferring an ampholytic behavior to the polymers. This method does not suffer from the presence of well-defined secondary structures along the polypeptide chains.

    3. Fabrication of Patterned Polydiacetylene Composite Films Using a Replica-Molding (REM) Technique (pages 270–274)

      Oktay Yarimaga, Sumi Lee, Jong-Man Kim and Yang-Kyu Choi

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900662

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      3D solid and image patterns of a polydiacetylene composite on a free-standing film are fabricated using a REM method with consequent self-aligned back-side UV-light irradiation. Thermal stress induces a blue-to-red color transition of the polymerized regions with generation of functional fluorescence patterns.

    4. Iron-Mediated ICAR ATRP of Styrene and Methyl Methacrylate in the Absence of Thermal Radical Initiator (pages 275–280)

      Lifen Zhang, Jie Miao, Zhenping Cheng and Xiulin Zhu

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900575

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      The ICAR ATRP of styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) without any added thermal radical initiator are conducted for the first time using oxidatively stable FeCl3·6H2O as the catalyst and cheap, commercially available tris(3,6-dioxaheptyl) amine (TDA-1) as the ligand in the absence/presence of a limited amount of air. It is found that the polymerization of St can be conducted well even if the amount of iron(III) is as low as 50ppm.

    5. Polymer Brushes via Controlled, Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) from Graphene Oxide (pages 281–288)

      Sun Hwa Lee, Daniel R. Dreyer, Jinho An, Aruna Velamakanni, Richard D. Piner, Sungjin Park, Yanwu Zhu, Sang Ouk Kim, Christopher W. Bielawski and Rodney S. Ruoff

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900641

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      The covalent attachment of ATRP initiators to graphene oxide followed by a surface-initiated polymerization affords derivatives with surface-attached polymer brushes. The product is found to have dramatically increased solubility without altering the structural properties inherent to graphene oxide.

    6. Controlling the Photoluminescence from a Laser Dye through the Oxidation Level of Polypyrrole (pages 289–294)

      Marcos J. L. Santos, Emerson M. Girotto and Alexandre G. Brolo

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900489

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      The photoluminescence of oxazine 720 embedded into a polypyrrole matrix is shown to be controlled by the oxidation level of the polymer. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism is proposed to be responsible for the controlled PL. FRET calculations were used to estimate the dependence of the apparent donor–acceptor distance with the applied potential.

    7. Viscoelastic Behavior and Force Nature of Thermo-Reversible Epoxy Dry Adhesives (pages 295–299)

      Ruomiao Wang, Xingcheng Xiao and Tao Xie

      Version of Record online: 10 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900594

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      Epoxy based thermo-reversible dry adhesives having intrinsic adhesion two orders of magnitude higher than that of silicon rubbers typically used to fabricate gecko-inspired dry adhesives are reported. The origin of the strong adhesion is revealed based on the diverse non-covalent molecular interactions (notably hydrogen bonding) with various substrates. This study suggests that maximum adhesion for gecko-inspired dry adhesives may be achieved by a combined chemical and topological approach.

    8. Tailoring Polymeric Hydrogels through Cyclodextrin Host–Guest Complexation (pages 300–304)

      Xuhong Guo, Jie Wang, Li Li, Duc-Truc Pham, Philip Clements, Stephen F. Lincoln, Bruce L. May, Qingchuan Chen, Li Zheng and Robert K. Prud'homme

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900560

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      Steric effects and competitive intra- and intermolecular host–guest complexation between β-cyclodextrin and adamantyl substituted poly(acrylate)s in water: A 1H NMR, rheological and preparative study.

    9. 1,1-Diphenyl Ethylene-Mediated Radical Polymerisation: A General Non-Metal-Based Technique For The Synthesis Of Precise Core Cross-Linked Star Polymers (pages 305–309)

      Jing Fung Tan, Anton Blencowe, Tor Kit Goh and Greg G. Qiao

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900576

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      DPE-terminated homopolymers were linked together using a cross-linker to afford a variety of low polydispersity CCS polymers. The figure shows the schematic of core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer synthesis via DPE-mediated polymerisation.

    10. Observations on Solution Crystallization of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in the Presence of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (pages 310–316)

      Marilyn L. Minus, Han Gi Chae and Satish Kumar

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900539

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      In this work observations on single crystals grown in PVA/SWNT dispersions, which point to epitaxial PVA-SWNT interactions are described. Dilute PVA/SWNT dispersions result in leaf-like as well as hexagonal crystals. Diffraction results show that spacings in these crystals are similar to the 2D hexagonal crystal packing of SWNT, suggesting a PVA-SWNT epitaxial interaction.

    11. Cross-Linked Multilayers of Poly(vinyl amine) as a Single Component and Their Interaction with Proteins (pages 317–322)

      Ecaterina S. Dragan and Florin Bucatariu

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900630

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      Multilayer thin films with a high adsorption capacity for proteins consisting solely of poly(vinylamine) (PVAm) as a single component were generated by a selective cross-linking of the (PVAm) layers in [PVAm/poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)]n multilayers, deposited onto silica microparticles or silicon wafers by LbL technique, followed by the selective removal of PAA.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 3/2010

      Oktay Yarimaga, Sumi Lee, Jong-Man Kim and Yang-Kyu Choi

      Version of Record online: 29 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: Replica molding and self-aligned polymerization afford rapid fabrication of morphological and color image patterns on free-standing composite polydiacetylene (PDA) films. Thermochromic and thermo-fluorescence 3D patterns are very promising for PDA-based imaging applications. Further details can be found in the article by O. Yarimaga, S. Lee, J.-M. Kim,* and Y.-K. Choi*on page 270.

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