Macromolecular Rapid Communications

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 4

February 16, 2010

Volume 31, Issue 4

Pages 327–410

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 4/2010

      Jörg Barner, Rabie Al-Hellani, A. Dieter Schlüter and Jürgen P. Rabe

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Front Cover: Single chains of a neutral dendronized polymer with peripheral azide groups are co-deposited with charged plasmid dsDNA on a pre-coated graphite surface. A “move-connect-prove” sequence within a scanning force microscope shows that with UV-light single chains of the two different polymers can be covalently connected at arbitrary positions. Further details can be found in the article by J. Barner, R. Al-Hellani, A. D. Schlüter,* and J. P. Rabe*on page 362.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 4/2010 (pages 327–330)

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090008

  3. Feature Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Metal-Containing Polymers: Building Blocks for Functional (Nano)Materials (pages 331–350)

      Xiaosong Wang and Ronan McHale

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900558

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal containing polymers have emerged as a route for the synthesis of functional supramolecular (nano)materials. Such polymers possess a range of functions associated with the incorporated metal units and can be prepared in the form of insoluble crystalline porous solids, processible main chain polymers, gels and colloids. Developing synthetic and supramolecular chemistry for controlled preparation has been regarded as a major challenge to propel the field to the next level. This Feature Article provides a concise overview of recent progress in the field.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Self-Complementary Nucleoside-Thiophene Hybrid Systems: Synthesis and Supramolecular Organization (pages 351–355)

      Maria Luisa Navacchia, Laura Favaretto, Emanuele Treossi, Vincenzo Palermo and Giovanna Barbarella

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900660

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-complementary nucleoside-bithiophene conjugates linked to the sugar unit or to the nucleobase by means of different bridges are synthesized and polymerized. Pure polymers as well as their mixtures show spontaneous self-organization in crystalline structures in cast films on glass.

    2. Impact of Nanoscale Confinement on Crystal Orientation of Poly(ethylene oxide) (pages 356–361)

      Haopeng Wang, Jong K. Keum, Anne Hiltner and Eric Baer

      Version of Record online: 5 JAN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900653

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymers exhibit unusual crystallization behavior when confined at the nanoscale. In this paper, we describe an unexpected and abrupt transition in crystallization habit of confined poly(ethylene oxide) nanolayers, from large, in-plane lamellae to an on-edge lamellar orientation depending on the crystallization temperature.

    3. Synthesis with Single Macromolecules: Covalent Connection between a Neutral Dendronized Polymer and Polyelectrolyte Chains as well as Graphene Edges (pages 362–367)

      Jörg Barner, Rabie Al-Hellani, A. Dieter Schlüter and Jürgen P. Rabe

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900438

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a scanning force microscope, a move-connect-prove sequence is employed to covalently link single dendronized polymers functionalized with peripheral azide groups, to charged polymers including dsDNA, and also graphene edges. The basal plane of graphite modified with monolayers of charged flat lying surfactants is used, in order to immobilize the single polymers and yet limit friction during their manipulation across the surface with the SFM tip.

    4. Studying and Suppressing Olefin Isomerization Side Reactions During ADMET Polymerizations (pages 368–373)

      Patrice A. Fokou and Michael A. R. Meier

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By preparing renewable polyesters via ADMET polymerization and subsequent transesterification of the resulting polymers with methanol we can quantify the amount of olefin isomerization side reactions. In a second step, we show that the isomerization can be almost completely suppressed with benzoquinone, thus offering the possibility of preparing well-defined polymers with second generation ruthenium based metathesis catalysts.

    5. Poly(vinyl phosphonic acid): Hydrodynamic Properties and SEC-Calibration in Aqueous Solution (pages 374–379)

      Clara Strandberg, Christine Rosenauer and Gerhard Wegner

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900605

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Poly(vinyl phosphonic acid) as obtained by free radical polymerization of aqueous vinyl phosphonic acid was studied by light scattering and size exclusion chromatography in dilute aqueous solutions containing sufficient salt in order to screen long range electrostatic interactions. It is a water soluble polymer that shows hydrodynamic behavior identical to poly(acrylic acid) at a pH of 7.

    6. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Supramolecular Composites (pages 380–384)

      Anindarupa Chunder, Jianhua Liu and Lei Zhai

      Version of Record online: 1 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900626

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Poly(3-hexylthiohene) (P3HT) forms supramolecular nanowire structures on a P3HT-dispersed and unfunctionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayer. P3HT-dispersed RGO can induce the crystallization of P3HT from its solution. The composite structures have been characterized by TEM and AFM, and Raman spectroscopy indicates the interaction between P3HT and RGO. Such an approach leads to interesting composite materials for electrical applications.

    7. A Novel High Throughput Method to Investigate Polymer Dissolution (pages 385–390)

      Ying Zhang, Surya K. Mallapragada and Balaji Narasimhan

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900578

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The dissolution behavior of polystyrene (PS) in biodiesel was studied by developing a novel high throughput approach based on Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy. A multiwell device for high throughput dissolution testing was fabricated using a photolithographic rapid prototyping method. This approach combined multiwell substrates and FTIR microscopy and was applied to study the dissolution kinetics of PS in biodiesel. This high throughput approach with FTIR microscopy is promising for a number of applications involving transport phenomena in polymer.

    8. New Low Bandgap Dithienylbenzothiadiazole Vinylene Based Copolymers: Synthesis and Photovoltaic Properties (pages 391–398)

      Bo Liu, Ahmed Najari, Chunyue Pan, Mario Leclerc, Dequan Xiao and Yingping Zou

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A series of new dithienylbenzothiadiazole vinylene based copolymers have been synthesized by Heck cross-coupling polymerization, namely poly(1,4-dioctoxyl-2,5-divinylbenzene-co-4,7-dithiophene-2′-yl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole] (PPV-DTBT) and poly(3,8-divinyl-N-octyl-diphenylamine-co-4,7-dithiophene-2′-yl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole) (PDPAV-DTBT). They show broad absorption bands, good air stability, low bandgap, and good photovoltaic properties.

    9. Formation of Vesicular Morphologies via Polymerization Induced Self-Assembly and Re-Organization (pages 399–404)

      Wen-Ming Wan, Xiao-Li Sun and Cai-Yuan Pan

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900640

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various vesicular morphologies including spherical vesicles, nanotubes, and compound vesicles with different shapes can be formed using RAFT polymerization by polymerization-induced self-assembly and re-organization. The formation of the block copolymers, self-assembly, and morphology re-organization are accomplished in a one-pot polymerization at a concentration higher than 0.5 g · mL−1. Thus the preparation of nanostructured materials on a large scale is possible.

    10. A Novel Approach for Mixing ZnO Nanoparticles into Poly(ethyl methacrylate) (pages 405–410)

      Mukesh Agrawal, Nikolaos E. Zafeiropoulos, Smrati Gupta, Ekaterina Svetushkina, Jürgen Pionteck, Andrij Pich and Manfred Stamm

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900584

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A facile, novel, and versatile approach for the mixing of inorganic filler nanoparticles into a host polymer matrix is demonstrated. The employed approach is found to offer a significant increase in thermal and mechanical properties of the host polymer matrix at the inorganic filler level of as little as 0.24wt.-%.

  5. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Feature Article
    5. Communications
    6. Back Cover
    1. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 4/2010

      Haopeng Wang, Jong K. Keum, Anne Hiltner and Eric Baer

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/marc.201090009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Back Cover: A layer-multiplying coextrusion process (top) is used to fabricate films with thousands of alternating polymer nanolayers. By crystallizing the confined poly(ethylene oxide) nanolayers at various temperatures, a new crystalline morphology and an abrupt transition in the crystallization habit from an on-edge lamellar orientation to large, in-plane lamellae are found. Further details can be found in the article by H. Wang, J. K. Keum, A. Hiltner,* and E. Baer on page 356.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION